Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
The Perils Of Outsourcing Surgery  
User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13554 posts, RR: 62
Posted (3 years 3 months 7 hours ago) and read 1815 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Terrible, terrible story - my friend's step-niece passed away as a result of her decision to cross the border into Tijuana for lap-band surgery that went bad:

http://www.10news.com/video/28055334/index.html

It shocks me that people would consider traveling abroad for surgery to save money. Another example - and thankfully, not a fatal one - a co-worker flew to India (HE NON-REVVED BOTH WAYS!) to have lap-band surgery performed, and nearly died from complications.

I'm sure there are many fine doctors overseas, but the decision to travel abroad to nations that have what are perceived as less-advanced medical care for complicated surgery amazes me.

Or am I wrong? Is outsourcing surgery to save a buck just part of the new global marketplace?


"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11586 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 6 hours ago) and read 1783 times:

It's what makes this country great! We can travel thousands of miles because we have no public coverage we all pay into, so we have to shell out thousands of dollars to get basic care but thousands more to get any meaningful care. Isn't it great to live in the free market?


Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 6 hours ago) and read 1779 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
It shocks me that people would consider traveling abroad for surgery to save money.

Often the reason for going abroad is not to save money, but because that is the only way the person can afford the surgery.

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
but the decision to travel abroad to nations that have what are perceived as less-advanced medical care for complicated surgery amazes me.

I'm not sure that I would catagorize Mexico or India as 'less-advanced' for surgical care. For the level of basic care of the general population, sure.

As with any surgery, one has to be careful and research the practioner and the clinic / hospitals involved.

The particular surgery you mentioned - lap-band - has many shady, fly by night, assembly line 'surgery centers' in the US. Plenty of horror stories about deaths and complications from what are supposedly unskilled or inatentative practioners and dirty facilities in the US.


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13554 posts, RR: 62
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 months 3 hours ago) and read 1735 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
It shocks me that people would consider traveling abroad for surgery to save money.

Often the reason for going abroad is not to save money, but because that is the only way the person can afford the surgery.
Quoting seb146 (Reply 1):
We can travel thousands of miles because we have no public coverage we all pay into, so we have to shell out thousands of dollars to get basic care but thousands more to get any meaningful care.

You'll note that the surgeries I'm referring to are elective in nature. Not sure how you can tie problems with the current U.S. healthcare system to this, but hey, nice try.   

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
but the decision to travel abroad to nations that have what are perceived as less-advanced medical care for complicated surgery amazes me.

I'm not sure that I would catagorize Mexico or India as 'less-advanced' for surgical care. For the level of basic care of the general population, sure.

I never said I'd categorize them as that, but rather that they are typically perceived as being 'less-advanced' than their U.S. counterparts.

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
The particular surgery you mentioned - lap-band - has many shady, fly by night, assembly line 'surgery centers' in the US. Plenty of horror stories about deaths and complications from what are supposedly unskilled or inatentative practioners and dirty facilities in the US.

I don't doubt it, although my quick-'n-dirty analysis of death rates for lap-band procedures performed in the U.S. is 3 in 10,000, less than many other major surgical procedures. It'd be interesting to know what the rate of death for this procedure is when performed outside the U.S.

Interestingly, from what I've read approximately 90% of lap-band patients can expect some sort of complication following their surgery. With statistics like that, it's a wonder anyone has this crap done in the first place!



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25148 posts, RR: 46
Reply 4, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1688 times:

Medical tourism has become a huge business globally, and one that is not just for individuals seeking deals, but also now used by governments formally sending their patients for procedures in other nations.

At the end of the day, I suppose with the ease of travel and globalization, travel tourism is a logical avenue for many to deal with issues including as lack of access, expertise or affordability.

Anyhow, for every bad story there certainly are hundreds of positive ones. Here in SoCal I've probably run across hundreds of folks over the years that crossed over to Mexico for everything from dentistry, plastic surgery, or follow up for some ailment or another, and honestly have never heard anything but positive concensus.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1635 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
Or am I wrong??

For the most part I'd say yes. I guess this one just hit too close to home. Thousands of these surgeries take place daily without a hitch. I dunno about elsewhere but Mexico has excellent private hospitals, and a respected medical education system. Also, foreign countries don't have to deal with the pesky FDA regs. I know many doctors in the US that say the profession has gone down hill because being a doctor now requires more paperwork and legal mumbo jumbo even to just pull a tooth than ever before. You don't really get these problems elsewhere. And these countries do have an FDA equivalent its just not nearly as anal and cumbersome.

[Edited 2011-06-01 06:44:56]

User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8838 posts, RR: 24
Reply 6, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1613 times:

Quoting seb146 (Reply 1):
It's what makes this country great! We can travel thousands of miles because we have no public coverage we all pay into, so we have to shell out thousands of dollars to get basic care but thousands more to get any meaningful care. Isn't it great to live in the free market?

Umm, I have been to some of the Indian hospitals which mainly cater to foreigners, and the vast majority of foreign patients there are British, French, and even Canadian. They come from places with state-run health care because they don't want to wait a year or more for something they feel they need right away. The surgeries I saw most often were hip and knee replacement and back surgery.

I don't recall ever meeting Americans there, although I'm sure there are some. But the bulk of their business comes from state-rationed health care countries.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineluv2fly From United States of America, joined May 2003, 12099 posts, RR: 49
Reply 7, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1611 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Costa Rica is known for its cosmetic surgery, though to be honest I would never consider a serious operation like stomach stapling and such to get out of country for.


You can cut the irony with a knife
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15735 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1566 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
I'm sure there are many fine doctors overseas, but the decision to travel abroad to nations that have what are perceived as less-advanced medical care for complicated surgery amazes me.

Does anyone have any actual data on the complication and mortality rates of other countries versus the US, or are we just going to make sweeping judgments based on two cases?



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 9, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1552 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

First of all, give my condolences to your friend. It must be terrible to lose someone so young, and the element of guilt must also be present. I am truly sorry.
Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
I'm not sure that I would catagorize Mexico or India as 'less-advanced' for surgical care. For the level of basic care of the general population, sure.

As with any surgery, one has to be careful and research the practioner and the clinic / hospitals involved.

Mexico´s private Medical System is among the best in the world. In some cases better than the US because we don´t have to wait 10 years for certain drugs to be approved. If they are approved in Europe, for example, they will be used here. This is specially true with many anti-pshycotics, for example, and surgeries. LASIK was being done here at least 5 years before it was done in the US. Thank the FDA.

The Public System, specially the Specialty Centers are also top notch. Both in treatment and in research. The problem, is that past governments have not been able to keep up with population growth but that is changing. Medical schools, too, private and public, are also among the most prestigious.

Now, lap band surgery in Tijuana.....mmmmmhh, it frankly sounds like a bad science fiction story. However, it bothers me that you are attributing her death to her decision to do it outside the US:

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
as a result of her decision to cross the border into Tijuana for lap-band surgery that went bad:

So you are saying that she died becauase she was operated outside the US? While the reality is that:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
The particular surgery you mentioned - lap-band - has many shady, fly by night, assembly line 'surgery centers' in the US. Plenty of horror stories about deaths and complications from what are supposedly unskilled or inatentative practioners and dirty facilities in the US.

Exactly, I´ve met a couple of Endocrinologists for my diabetes that without any tests told me to go the bariatric surgery route. Until I met one, who actuallly took an interest and while I have still not reached my weight goal, witha nutriologist supervised diet, exercise and a support group I´ve lost over 30 lbs. I´ve still got 30 more lbs to go, but I´m getting there.

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 4):
Anyhow, for every bad story there certainly are hundreds of positive ones. Here in SoCal I've probably run across hundreds of folks over the years that crossed over to Mexico for everything from dentistry, plastic surgery, or follow up for some ailment or another, and honestly have never heard anything but positive concensus.

You maybe right, and I do not know much about Tijuana, but it would not be my first choice to go look for COMPLICATED medical procedures. The best places in Mexico for that are Monterrey and Mexico City. A whole and successful, I might add, medical tourism industry has grown in Monterrey in the past 6 years.

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 5):
For the most part I'd say yes. I guess this one just hit too close to home. Thousands of these surgeries take place daily without a hitch. I dunno about elsewhere but Mexico has excellent private hospitals, and a respected medical education system.

     



MGGS
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8225 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1494 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):

Or am I wrong? Is outsourcing surgery to save a buck just part of the new global marketplace?

A lot of people travel out of country for procedures or prescriptions simply because we have the most expensive medical care system in the world.

As for the quality of care overseas, it depends on the doctors you are treated by, their training and the level of experience they have.

And sometimes it depends of availability in the US. For some years you had to go to the UK for a total hip as it was invented there and it took time for it to be FDA approved. Finally made it to the US after US Docs went to the UK to learn how to do it. Around 71-72 IIRC.

Inventions are still going on around the world so there will be treatments available internationally that are not available in the US, or only available from Doctors with less experience.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19568 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1456 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 6):

Umm, I have been to some of the Indian hospitals which mainly cater to foreigners, and the vast majority of foreign patients there are British, French, and even Canadian. They come from places with state-run health care because they don't want to wait a year or more for something they feel they need right away. The surgeries I saw most often were hip and knee replacement and back surgery.

I don't recall ever meeting Americans there, although I'm sure there are some. But the bulk of their business comes from state-rationed health care countries.

As usual, you see it through your GOP-colored glasses.

Fact is that in most Western socialized systems, patients get the care they need and they get it quickly. That's what the FACTS (I know you don't care about such cumbersome things) show. The patients you see there are patients who need non-essential operations or who don't need operations but have decided that they will take the matter into their own hands.

Many of the orthopedic procedures done in India and Mexico for foreigners are not medically indicated, but the patient decides they want it, are told they don't need it and thus won't get it, and so they fly down there for it. The hospitals down there are more than happy to take their money, so they do.

You won't see many American patients in India because it takes a very long flight to get there, when Mexico is much closer.

As for the OP, bariatric surgery is very risky and has a high complication rate. You are doing a major abdominal procedure on an obese patient, so there are many risk factors to start. When combined with the resulting rapid weight loss (which can cause all sorts of medical problems), bariatric procedures are no small risk.


User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 8872 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1440 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 11):
As usual, you see it through your GOP-colored glasses.

Fact is that in most Western socialized systems, patients get the care they need and they get it quickly. That's what the FACTS (I know you don't care about such cumbersome things) show. The patients you see there are patients who need non-essential operations or who don't need operations but have decided that they will take the matter into their own hands.

Many of the orthopedic procedures done in India and Mexico for foreigners are not medically indicated, but the patient decides they want it, are told they don't need it and thus won't get it, and so they fly down there for it. The hospitals down there are more than happy to take their money, so they do.

You won't see many American patients in India because it takes a very long flight to get there, when Mexico is much closer.

As for the OP, bariatric surgery is very risky and has a high complication rate. You are doing a major abdominal procedure on an obese patient, so there are many risk factors to start. When combined with the resulting rapid weight loss (which can cause all sorts of medical problems), bariatric procedures are no small risk.DocLightning -- Certified Mad Doctor

Ok Doc, tell it like it is, I cannot agree more, and you are the Doctor. Now about that last thread we discussed  



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8838 posts, RR: 24
Reply 13, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1438 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 11):

As usual, you see it through your GOP-colored glasses.

Fact is that in most Western socialized systems, patients get the care they need and they get it quickly. That's what the FACTS (I know you don't care about such cumbersome things) show. The patients you see there are patients who need non-essential operations or who don't need operations but have decided that they will take the matter into their own hands.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/249938.stm

Quote:
Patients are suffering and some have died as a result of rationing in the NHS, doctors have claimed.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/20...-healthcare-chiefs-ration-services

Quote:
Growing numbers of patients are being denied treatment for conditions such as loss of sight, arthritis and infertility as the NHS increasingly rations healthcare in order to save money, research by the Guardian shows.

Services for patients with mental health problems and addictions and those who need physiotherapy after accidents are being scaled back, while operations to fix hernias or remove cataracts or varicose veins are either being refused or delayed.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ay-for-painkilling-injections.html

Quote:
Tens of thousands with chronic back pain will be forced to live in agony after a decision to slash the number of painkilling injections issued on the NHS, doctors have warned.
http://www.politicsdaily.com/2009/08...ls-why-the-british-have-bad-teeth/

Quote:
the British dental system provides a compelling counter-example of what happens when universal health care gets it wrong.

That's just from the first page of google results.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19568 posts, RR: 58
Reply 14, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1431 times:

Yes, the UK has a known problem. They have for a while. Now be a good boy and check out the rest of Western Europe.

And then compare how many of those patients get their needed services with how well ours do.


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8838 posts, RR: 24
Reply 15, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1414 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
Yes, the UK has a known problem. They have for a while. Now be a good boy and check out the rest of Western Europe.

The UK speaks English. Unless you want me posting in French and Swedish, I'll use the UK.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):

And then compare how many of those patients get their needed services with how well ours do.
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=179598

(Quoting a Spectator article, post #3)

Quote:
But the curious thing is that the new, improved, simple state system of Britain does not work as well as the American muddle. You have a better chance of living to see another day in the American mishmash non-system with its sweet pills of charity, its dose of municipal care and large injection of rampant capitalist supply (even despite the blanket of over-regulation) than in the British system where the state does everything. It is not that America is good at running healthcare. It is just that British state-run healthcare is so amazingly, achingly, miserably and mortally incompetent.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinemirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 16, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1410 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting EA CO AS (Thread starter):
but the decision to travel abroad to nations that have what are perceived as less-advanced medical care for complicated surgery amazes me.

While there are many parameters to consider, just one thought came to mind.....

When we visit, we're told 'don't drink the water.' So why would we look at the cost of surgery?


That said, I also find that the majority of patients going out of country are doing so for elective surgeries. In my field, I have not seen many long term successes.



Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8133 posts, RR: 26
Reply 17, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1399 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 15):
The UK speaks English. Unless you want me posting in French and Swedish, I'll use the UK.

Laziness Charles...a quick google search will also point you toward peer-reviewed research by the NIH and researchers from some of our finest university hospitals regarding outcomes and complication rates in the US compared to other industrialized nations. Other language proficiency is not required.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineHSVXJ From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 228 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1375 times:

Having had bariatric surgery myself (not the lap band) I have heard this from others quite a bit. A lot of people resort to going to Mexico for lap-band surgery because of problems getting it in the U.S. I agree that so many of these doctors (both in and out of the states) run surgery mills just to collect the money and not give a shit about aftercare in any way.

People who get the lapband installed in a foreign country have no idea what they're getting into or else they wouldn't do it, and it has nothing to do with the quality of foreign medical care. One of the reasons that I didn't choose the lap band (besides the fact that it has the worst success rate of any of the 4 major bariatric surgeries) is that it also requires the most medical aftercare. First of all, you have a huge laytex and plastic foreign object in your abdomen that HAS to come out again in ten years or so. Second, they have a relatively high incidence of slippage or other complications. Third, adjustable bands have to be tightened or loosened every so often using a stomach port and a saline injection in order to achieve the right amount of restriction. This point is different for many people and sometimes requires trial and error (and many horrible, painful injections) to get there. Fourth, most bariatric doctors in the US will not touch someone who has been lap banded outside of the US for reasons which may or may not be valid. Have a slippage? Unless you can afford another trip to wherever, you're screwed. Need a fill? Not gonna happen. Obviously, people who go this route have no business even getting the surgery as they apparently don't understand its consequences. They're not looking at the big picture.

Here in the Philippines, medical tourism isn't that big yet, but I expect it to get larger in the coming years. I have had one surgery here (my knees) and besides small differences, like walking into the OR on my own and paying cash upfront, it was no different, and in a lot of ways better, than the many surgeries I've had in the states.

Chris



Nature forms us for ourselves, not for others; to be, not to seem.
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21569 posts, RR: 55
Reply 19, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1362 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 15):
The UK speaks English. Unless you want me posting in French and Swedish, I'll use the UK.

If you have to post in French or Swedish in order to do a valid comparison, do so. I'm pretty sure a member from one of those countries would be able to provide a translation.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8488 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1352 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 2):
Often the reason for going abroad is not to save money, but because that is the only way the person can afford the surgery.

Absolutely. Many Americans do not have access to care at all. Say, an uninsured person with $100,000 in the bank. Do you really want to spend $50k of your $100k on surgery, when you can do it in Thailand or India for $3000, by well trained doctors?

These people have no choice. It's live or die basically. The financial risks of going into care here are considerable.

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 10):
As for the quality of care overseas, it depends on the doctors you are treated by, their training and the level of experience they have.

Yes. Kind of like aircraft mechanics. It all depends which operation (which people) are handling your task, not the country you are in.


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1817 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1338 times:

Quoting Mir (Reply 19):
If you have to post in French or Swedish in order to do a valid comparison, do so. I'm pretty sure a member from one of those countries would be able to provide a translation.

First hit for "tourisme médical inde" shows this Le Figaro article:

http://www.lefigaro.fr/international...-medical-se-porte-bien-en-inde.php

That states:

Quote:
Le profil de ces étrangers venus faire leurs «emplettes» médicales est très varié. Américains, Européens, Africains, Asiatiques, les patients affluent de tous les continents. Les opérations les plus pratiquées relèvent du domaine de la chirurgie orthopédique, cardio-vasculaire ou plastique. La nationalité de ces étrangers varie en fonction de ces différentes spécialités.

Alors que les patients venus des États du Golfe ou des pays voisins de l'Inde sont majoritaires dans le service de cardiologie, le docteur Samir Kumta, chirurgien plasticien au Lilavati Hospital, constate, lui, le nombre toujours plus important des patients européens et américains: «Je fais très peu de chirurgie réparatrice sur les patients étrangers alors qu'il s'agit de mon activité première avec des patients indiens. Les étrangers viennent surtout pour des interventions de chirurgie esthétique qui, elles, ne sont pas remboursées dans leurs pays et coûtent beaucoup moins cher en Inde», explique-t-il. Une rhinoplastie coûte ainsi moins de 2000 dollars en Inde, alors qu'elle peut dépasser 10.000 dollars aux États-Unis.

So roughly:

The profile of these foreigners is very varied. Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, patients come from all continents. The most common procedures are orthopedic, cardiovascular and plastic surgery. The nationality of the patient varies depending on the different specialities.

While patients coming from Gulf states or countries neighboring India are a majority in the cardiology department, Dr. Samir Kumta, plastic surgeon, ackowledges an increasing number of American and European patients. "I do very little reparative surgery on foreign patients, even though it's what I mostly do with local patients. Foreigners come mostly for plastic surgery which are not covered in their countries and cost far less in India". A rhinoplasty costs less than 2000$ in India while it can cost in excess of 10.000$ in the US.

Or this one:

http://www.journaldunet.com/economie...nces/tourisme-medical/4-inde.shtml

Quote:
En Inde, le tourisme médical explose. En 2005, 120.000 patients sont venus profiter des soins indiens, et le phénomène ne cesse de s'accroître. Le gouvernement encourage même son développement. L'économie nationale peut tirer un grand bénéfice de la vitalité de ce secteur : de 270 millions d'euros en 2003, il pourrait générer 1 milliards d'euros d'ici 2012. Les patients, principalement britanniques et américains, sont attirés par les prix -une opération du cœur y est facturée moins de 3.000 euros contre 32.000 euros aux Etats-Unis-, la pratique de l'anglais et la compétence des médecins, bien souvent formés dans les universités européennes ou américaines.

(...)The patients, mostly British and Americans, are attracted by the low prices - a heart surgery costs less than 3.000 euro against 32.000 euro in the US-(...).

Now, a Spanish source, a medical blog by a doctor.

http://medicablogs.diariomedico.com/...-turismo-medico-un-sector-en-auge/

Which, after a fair in Barcelona where there were a lot of providers but very few customers comes on to list the most likely medical tourism in Europe:

Quote:
Pero como se comentó, este sueño de opulencia, la “fiebre del oro” médica, se ha extendido. Cada región busca sus “pacientes ricos”, confiando en su calidad y sus recursos. Hay países que los tienen (los colindantes a Alemania, que captan tratamientos dentales, por ejemplo, o el Magreb, que captaba cirugías estéticas francesas), y otros que los buscan (con más o menos suerte y acierto). El turista médico deseado tipo en Europa viene de Rusia o de los países árabes, con alto potencial económico y necesidades muy concretas de idioma o costumbres. Pero esos pacientes son escasos y dispersos, y acaban en Alemania.

(...)this dream of opulence, of a medical "golden era" is now commonplace. Every region is looking for their rich patients, trusting their quality and resources. There are countries who have them (those neighboring Germany, who get mostly dental patients and those of the Maghreb who does a lot of aesthetic work for French patients) and others who just look for them. The best wished for medical tourist in Europe comes from Russia or Arab countries, with high economic potential and very specific needs, but those are patients are few and sparse, and end up in Germany.


User currently offlineaa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3347 posts, RR: 8
Reply 22, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1254 times:

When I was in India, a friend got some dental implants put in. The cost of the implants (maybe three or four) and some other dental procedures was about the cost of one implant in the United States. That being said, the guy didn't use any sedatives during surgery.

He thought the quality was good. That being said, my biggest concern about getting a procedure would be post-op complications. Of course, I'm sure they'd give you a copy of the medical records, but I'd prefer to be able to quickly reach the surgeon that performed the surgery.

I also have to say I'd be less likely to go to India for surgery after being in a highly rated private hospital in a big city. I had fine outcomes, but I just had a feeling of unease. I'd have to do a lot of research before I got a surgery there or in any other developing country. To be perfectly honest, I just wouldn't trust the oversight mechanisms in a lot of these places.

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 10):
A lot of people travel out of country for procedures or prescriptions simply because we have the most expensive medical care system in the world.

My guess is that a lot of these procedures are elective. Most of the ads I've seen are for things like nose jobs and breast implants.


User currently offlineRabenschlag From Germany, joined Oct 2000, 1007 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1251 times:

You get what you pay for - and you earn what you are worth. Isn't that our mantra? So stop complaining or change the mantra.

User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13078 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1235 times:

Of course, for years people have come to the USA from other countries for medical surgeries and treatments if you can afford our prices or have charity assistance, you will get some of the best quality care in the world.

Some may go from the USA or elsewhere to Mexico, Cuba, Brazil and other countries as they may not have access to the best care, it is too expensive, not covered by their insurance or government plan or too long of a delay. Another factor as to USA citizens and residents looking for medical services outside the USA is that sometimes our doctors will not do a procedure due to the risks that individual may present or they will not do certain low result or high risk procedures not yet approved here or out of fear by doctors and hospitals as to lawsuits if things go wrong.


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1817 posts, RR: 1
Reply 25, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1199 times:

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 24):
Another factor as to USA citizens and residents looking for medical services outside the USA is that sometimes our doctors will not do a procedure due to the risks that individual may present or they will not do certain low result or high risk procedures not yet approved here or out of fear by doctors and hospitals as to lawsuits if things go wrong.

That's a factor as well here.

Many of the stories about "country X rationed my healthcare and won't pay for surgery Y so I have to go to country Z" it's not because of cost constraints but because the procedure is not safe to perform on that particular case, it's not yet proven enough or will do little to alleviate the situation and probably add more complications to an already difficult situation.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
The Perils Of Letting Someone Borrow Your House posted Tue Jul 10 2007 18:32:04 by Oly720man
Perils Of The Political Poster posted Sun Jan 31 2010 12:07:45 by GDB
The Rapture Cometh-Get Ready For The End Of Times! posted Thu May 19 2011 10:52:38 by tugger
Glass Front Soda Machines - The Way Of The Future? posted Tue Jan 4 2011 17:15:50 by 1337Delta764
The Blizzard Of 2010 posted Sun Dec 26 2010 19:46:09 by dragon-wings
Surviving The End Of The World In 2012, In France posted Fri Dec 24 2010 08:15:44 by oly720man
In The Event Of A Nuclear Attack---- posted Thu Dec 16 2010 11:42:47 by ImperialEagle
Countdown For The Return Of Conan Coco Obrien posted Mon Nov 8 2010 18:53:28 by varigb707
What Is The Meaning Of Your Screen Name? posted Sat Oct 30 2010 17:53:19 by UAL747
The Best Of America You Remember posted Thu Oct 28 2010 10:12:03 by Ken777