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Is College Worth It?  
User currently offlinegoblin211 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1233 times:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpZtX...ture=pyv&ad=6739540474&kw=colleges
I DO plan on going to college but I went to collegehumor on youtube and this was a featured video. I clicked on it just to see what they had to say. I have my doubts on this.
a. they only talk about private colleges. they don't talk about any other types of colleges that aren't so useless and expensive.
b. they don't mention anything about the benefit of scholarships.
c. I believe that experience is what makes or breaks a college degree. sure, any college degree is useless if you don't have any experience in it.
For example, a BS in Business. My friend wants to get one from USF but I believe that he'll just be another Joe Shmoe unless he did some kind of an internship at a particular company or or has connections from already successful people in business. My friend doesn't have any of these things yet but he's got time he's just a senior in high school.

I guess my questions are the following.
1. What is your opinion of the video? (i.e. BS? Somewhat accurate? Very Accurate?)
2. I know I'm going to college despite the video but would you still recommend it after having seen the video?
3. What degree did you get?/going to get?
4. What did you do if you didn't go to college?
5. Do you use your degree?
6. Is it a good idea to go for an average business degree, what could you do with such a basic degree, assuming no special experience is done?
I'd really appreciate it if you would at least touch on the above questions. Thanks. They get into a lot of political stuff too. I'm not one to judge on politics since I'm just a senior but I think there's some inaccurate info regarding silver. I thought gold was better since it's so high right now? Silver isn't anywhere close. If the dollar were to collapse, I can't imagine the few who own silver would be the only people surviving a second great depression. Imagine a world where major celebs are broke because they didn't invest in SILVER? Kind of suspicious if you ask me.


From the airport with love
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8045 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1201 times:

The video hits a lot of important points, especially when it comes to the textbooks.

And, after paying a stack of money out to a plumber the other day (with more to come) there is little doubt that a lot of kids would be better off focusing on the trades than a general education college degree.

Some fields "should" provide for a successful entry into your chosen field. Engineering and accounting are two. It used to be that some medical related professions were fine with a BS degree. Now they push the professional knowledge classes to the Masters level, which adds nothing to the quality of care patients receive or the long term success of the provider. Physical Therapists head that list, IMHO, with Occupational Therapists following. I understand that RN and PA programs are still Bachelor level programs and the PA program is a pretty smart choice for bright students wanting to get into medicine without the overcharging for an advanced degree.

The key question you need to ask yourself is what do your want to do with your life? Decide that and then decide where and what you want to study.

Good luck!


User currently offlinefuturepilot16 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2035 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1188 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
I DO plan on going to college but I went to collegehumor on youtube and this was a featured video. I clicked on it just to see what they had to say. I have my doubts on this.

This is why you should avoid conspiracy videos, it gets you to actually consider something absurd for a moment!

Lately i've been asking myself the same question too, but the fact of the matter is, a lot of Jobs these days require advanced degrees. I'm in my final year and I have in fact learned some valuable life lessons from college.

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 1):
And, after paying a stack of money out to a plumber the other day (with more to come) there is little doubt that a lot of kids would be better off focusing on the trades than a general education college degree.

That's true, but College or no college, in order to learn a trade, you still gotta pay. It's just that some of these trade schools actually cost less money. Either that or you can learn to fix cars or air conditioning units from a family member or a friend



"The brave don't live forever, but the cautious don't live at all."
User currently offlinesan747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4939 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1181 times:

Absolutely for certain career fields. It's not as easy for all to go as it used to be, but if you're dedicated and motivated and have a goal in mind, college can be very beneficial- in more ways than just having a degree in your hand after a few years.


Scotty doesn't know...
User currently offlineairportugal310 From Tonga, joined Apr 2004, 3454 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1179 times:

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 2):
Lately i've been asking myself the same question too, but the fact of the matter is, a lot of Jobs these days require advanced degrees. I'm in my final year and I have in fact learned some valuable life lessons from college.

Same here (out of school for 3 years now), but I've reached the point where experience is counting for more than the degree.*

*I started on my chosen career path long before I graduated, so I have that going for me which is nice



hit it and quit it
User currently offlineHomsar From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 1109 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1130 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
1. What is your opinion of the video? (i.e. BS? Somewhat accurate? Very Accurate?)

The first three minutes were unwatchable. Not that I had any issues with what the video was saying, but I don't like the animation and graphics and giant numbers flashing across the screen designed to cater to people with a shorter attention span than a goldfish.

I'm probably not going to watch the rest of the video, because I don't feel like spending an hour on it.

[quote[2. I know I'm going to college despite the video but would you still recommend it after having seen the video?[/quote]

As I said, I only saw the first couple of minutes.

Quote:
3. What degree did you get?/going to get?

BBA - Accounting.

Quote:
5. Do you use your degree?

Not in my regular work. However, the degree did help me to understand how to read and interpret financial statements, and to know when things make sense and when they are BS (not referring to the degree).

Quote:
6. Is it a good idea to go for an average business degree, what could you do with such a basic degree, assuming no special experience is done?

Don't know what an "average business degree" is, at least, at the school I went to, you had to pick a field.

Anyway, the issue isn't so much "what can you do with a degree" as what do you want to do with your life? What kind of career do you want to get. There are some careers out there that require specific training that is best attained through college (medical, engineering, accounting, law, etc.). There are other careers out there that have degrees associated with them, but you could also get into those fields through other ways.

Then there are careers that don't really have a college program that will lead you to them, or if they do, such programs are few and far between. My field, for example, is transportation scheduling. I've never heard of a degree in scheduling (I guess the closest might be something like Transportation & Logistics), never studied this in college and never met any coworker or colleague who did either, but through a combination of common sense, an internship, and on-the-job training, I've done pretty well in the field.

Some people know very early on what they want to do for a living. Others don't have a clue as they're registering for college. Some never figure it out, and don't have a clue even as they approach retirement.

Without knowing which of those describes you, it's hard to specifically say what course of action you should take.

Definitely go to college and get a degree. Study something interesting and/or useful (if you're lucky, it will be both). If you know what you want to do for a career (or if you think you know), look into what requirements you'll need. If you can actually find a job posting (not sure if those exist or not anymore), see what the requirements are and what you'll need to do to meet them. You might be surprised, just as I was when the first job I got actually listed "accounting" as one of the types of degrees they were looking for in that position (and, no, I'm not trying to push an accounting degree on you).

If you don't know what you want to do, just go in and take some of the basic courses. You might find a course that really appeals to you, and decide that's where you want to focus your studies (that's actually how I wound up going with accounting). You generally don't have to declare a major until your third year, so there's room to change your mind as you get the required courses out of the way.

Now, as for graduate school? Total waste of money. I left halfway through to go into the workforce, and never really looked back. If I'd stuck around and finished my master's, I'd either be unemployed or unhappily employed at a job I don't like. Of course, I should say that I left because of a job opportunity. I don't want you to think that the job opportunity was a result of my leaving grad school.

A couple of points I'll touch on based on the first three minutes of the video that I did see (I know it's not all cartoony graphics, but that's just the portion I saw).

1) Despite whatever indoctrination may or may not be going on (in my case, the pressure came from within the family, not from the school), you don't need to go to a fancy ivy league school to be successful. I went to a run-of-the-mill state university (and not even the state's premiere university, either), paid about $5000-6000 a year in tuition, and graduated with some student loan debt (but not a crushing amount). If I had gone to a more expensive school, the only thing different would be the level of my debt right now. (In the field I work in, nobody gives a damn where you went to school.)

I'm sure there are some fields and some companies where your school does matter. I don't work in those fields/for those companies, and wouldn't want to.

2) Yes, textbooks are ridiculously expensive. Yes, the whole thing is a ripoff. My school wasn't quite as sinister as the video implied, but they were still ridiculous. After the first year, I started looking around for different options, which included checking textbooks out from the school library (it worked for one of my summer session classes), and buying them online. Even though they tend to come out with a new edition every few weeks, I learned that what was different was usually the color of the cover. Sometimes the chapters were a page or two off. Beyond that, I never even noticed that I was using an older edition borrowed from the library.

Hopefully, my ramblings are of some use. YMMV.



I was raised by a cup of coffee.
User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1199 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1081 times:

Disclaimer: I did not watch the video. However, I have strong feelings on the subject and will post them anyway. Feel free to discount, ignore, flame, or suggest deletion.

In 1966, less than 39% of all college freshman rated themselves as "above average". In 2009? Over 60% rated themselves as "above average". In 1969, only 19 percent of high school graduates earned an A or A-minus average grade, compared to the 48% in 2009.

You see, you and I, and the rest of our generation, are the product of a "generation me" environment. For whatever reason, our parents, teachers, and social leaders have decided that we cannot handle being let down, put down, or sub-par. High school teachers inflate grades so the students have a shot at college, or have an opportunity to get a scholarship. Parents don't know how to handle their children, don't know the value of discipline. Hell, most of 'em don't even know what discipline means.

While there is merit to kindness and gentleness, it has gone too far. As a result, kids our age think they are ready to conquer the world. Graduation speeches at high schools tell the students that the "world is yours!" and "YOU are our leaders of tomorrow!". We treat high school graduates as people to be lauded, as incredible human beings who have done what few others have done. Then, the kids get pushed out the door and shoved into a college dorm. We pretend we hold them to high standards, and we act surprised when so many of them lose their scholarships their first semester in college. We act surprised when many drop out, never to return.

Yet, are we really surprised? How can we have a nation filled to the brim of teeming talent that is all above average, that is made up of tomorrow's leaders? How can we tell each and every high school graduate that they are the next CEOs of The Coca-Cola Company, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Bayer, ExxonMobile, or Bank of America? How can we tell each student they will succeed? How can we tell each student that among them are the next senators and city council members?

We can't, and we shouldn't. The fact of the matter is, the large portion of the graduating classes are average. Plain and simple average; maybe a little brighter, maybe a little dumber. Parents do well to encourage their children, but not to the point of inflating their egos to the point that it harms the kid. Teachers should encourage their students, but not hurt them by inflating their grades when the student shows no improvement.

So, is college worth it? Well, I could tell you it is and I could tell you I have a much better position in life because I will be a college graduate.

Or, I could do the unpopular thing and say that college is good, excellent, in fact, if you are a person that can take advantage of everything it has to offer. If you aren't, then no. College will hurt you. It will put you into massive debt if you attend a school for the name recognition. It will hinder your ability to find jobs you can perform well in, if you are not the type of person who can fulfill jobs that college graduates fill. It will waste years of your life if you have a lazy attitude and don't dedicate your life towards it. It will leave you with regrets if you major in something that has no bearing on your job down the road.

Of course, I say all of that not to discourage your friend from attending college. In fact, to be honest, if he is friends with somebody like you, who can read, write, and do basic math, he probably really is an "above average" sort of guy and could benefit from attending. After all, I'm sure he is a cut above the others who cannot write a coherent sentence.

The ugly truth, though, is that it all depends on what you (or your friend, in this case) puts in to it, how you dedicate yourself, what choices you make, and a pinch of luck that may or may not find you on the day you need it.



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8045 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1063 times:

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 2):
That's true, but College or no college, in order to learn a trade, you still gotta pay.

Which is why I am a strong supporter of vocational educational education in high school for those who want it. I can think of nothing dumber than pushing a kid through pre-college courses when he wants to be an electrician or plumber or carpenter.

These kids need to graduate high school with a completed apprenticeship, or close to one.

That does not mean that we consider them stupid. Far from it and there should be the math and science courses that support their trade goal. We just need to spend the money during their high school years to prepare them for a future.


User currently offlineAI121 From Canada, joined Jan 2011, 55 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1031 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
I'm not one to judge on politics since I'm just a senior but I think there's some inaccurate info regarding silver. I thought gold was better since it's so high right now? Silver isn't anywhere close. If the dollar were to collapse, I can't imagine the few who own silver would be the only people surviving a second great depression. Imagine a world where major celebs are broke because they didn't invest in SILVER? Kind of suspicious if you ask me.

Gold and Silver rise in price to adjust their value against declining value of dollar. The more money Government prints the higher gold and silver will go. Silver seems better to analysts because it has industrial usage as well (chips for tablets and cell phones).
To answer your question: College is worth it as long as you keep yourself dedicated towards your field of study and gain some experience through internships. Degree is worthless now without experience. In North America, I can only see jobs growing in business and health care fields since jobs in manufacturing are just gone offshore.



dhRuv
User currently offlineAF340 From Canada, joined Jul 2007, 2786 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1026 times:

For me, I am starting to think that in order to have the lifestyle I want, I need to get not only a Masters, but a professional degree.

Currently, I am doing a BSc in International Relations (admittedly in the UK, not the US so it may not be as relevant), with an eye into going to law school when I am done.

For me, it's either consulting (yuck) or law school, and not too much in between. But it really does depend on what you're interested in and your degree. A math or econ. degree can be very useful on its own (of course, really only when paired with a high level internship).

Does a degree mean you will automatically make 300-400,000 a year? No, but to make that money you pretty much need a degree these days...


User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 12887 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1017 times:

Overall yes, but everyone should not go right out of high school or into a '4-year' school or live on campus or run up huge loan debt or even go at all.

About 50% of the people who enter a 4-year college get their degree in 5 years. That is a lot of drop-outs, doing so for academics, economic problems, substance abuse, psychical and mental health problems of themselves or family members, pregnancy/fathered a child, marriage, or finding out it wasn't for them.

Better might be to go to a local, commuting distance, county or community college to see if it is for you, save some money, become more mature, maybe find what may interest you before continuing to a 4 year institution or running up massive debt.


User currently offlineweebie From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 202 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 981 times:

Is it worth it...Yes is it worth it in America No!

America will go the way of Canada and Australia where the incomes of skilled trades will catch up with professionals. If you want a high paying secure profession head into plumbing or electrical. The problem with College is the extreme costs associated with it whilst in the UK and Australia students are paying for an entire degree what poor American students pay in 1 semester. I've personally noticed lately the large amount of American students heading to Australia for their education as an international student the options to enter a top Aussie School and the affordability (even as an international student, with the exchange rate) are far greater.

American Schools need to change a few things. Personally 4 year Batchelors need to be reduced to just 3 and the optio nof double degrees needs to be considered. More flexabilirty needs to be allowed as well such as night and online classes with trimesters. This will allow many people to continue to work whilst study. There is this weird unfounded assumption in the states that doing a degree is essentially a full time job when it's not.


User currently offlinekiwiinoz From New Zealand, joined Oct 2005, 2165 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 964 times:

Forgetting about the actual education, the college parties and uninhibited, experiemental sex are worth at least a year of your life. If things don't work out, drop out and move on

Regards


User currently offlineAirxliban From Lebanon, joined Oct 2003, 4504 posts, RR: 54
Reply 13, posted (2 years 9 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 943 times:

A college degree is a signaling device. It signals that you have a certain level of educational pedigree. Unless you're damn sure that you will never need that, you should get one.

Not having a college degree is also a signalling device. It sends the opposite message. That may or may not be important to you, so think very carefully before you decide not to bother with college.



PARIS, FRANCE...THE BEIRUT OF EUROPE.
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