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Do We Need Pigeons?  
User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3601 times:

There used to be a segment on the Ricky Gervais show, for those familiar, called ''Do We Need 'em?'' where Ricky, Steve and Karl discussed whether or not certain (annoying) animals should go, or if they're crucial to the eco system. And I've been wondering the same about pigeons.

I hate pigeons incredibly much. They look disgustingly hideous and the noises they make are essentially nature's invitation to kill them. And I would most happily volunteer.

However, there's a chance pigeons play their role in our eco system. I couldn't find a reliable answer to that question online, but since I live in a rather urban area, have serious doubts their existence is of any use.

On another note, what is the international law on killing wildlife? A German lawyer friend of mine said killing any non-endangered animal falls under criminal property damage; wildlife has no owner and is therefore not punishable. On a side note for German pet owners and haters alike, a killed dog incurs a €250 fine on average, a cat goes for €120. Plus, the cost of replacement obviously.

But how about pigeons? Do we need 'em?


..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
54 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7242 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3573 times:

Quoting something (Thread starter):
On a side note for German pet owners and haters alike, a killed dog incurs a €250 fine on average, a cat goes for €120. Plus, the cost of replacement obviously.

In the US (well I guess it varies by state) killing someones pet like a dog or cat can land you in jail for over a year. Which IMO it should.

Quoting something (Thread starter):
But how about pigeons? Do we need 'em?

That is a great question! In urban areas I feel like they just eat what they find on the street. I am sure they eat some things in trees or something. But I am not sure what they can help an eco-system for. They had to have had some reason to be here in the first place.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3525 times:

Something;
Here's a "pigeon story" you will just love...............

Back in the late 60's, I drove tank trucks for Texaco for about 7 yrs; the bulk terminal I worked out of had many big storage tanks, most of which were about 40 feet high, and some had "dome" tops o them. And we had lots of pigeons ! One Sunday ( when all the "suits" were not there ), a friend of mine brought his 22 cal. rifle to work with him, and he said, "lets go out and shoot some pigeons"; we were standing on this dike that surrounds each tank, and there maybe 24 or 30 pigeons on the dome roof of this tank, He gave me the rifle, and says, "here, you go first"; the gun had a small scope on it, and I was in the process of centering up the cross hairs on this one pigeon which was walking slowly right to left, and as he's just about "center up", i notice another one, about 2 ft farther back, and walking left to right; so I'm making a mental calculation, " wow, I think both of these buggers are going to "center up" at the same time"; half a second later, I have TWO birds "centered up", I squeezed off ONE round, and just like that, TWO pigeons come rolling down and off the roof !

That was maybe 52 years ago, and so far I have never succeeded in doing it again.


Texaco used to have this "anti-pigeon" paint they painted on tank roofs and cat walks...........it was supposed to burn their feet and discourage them from "hanging around", but I don't think it was all that effective, or at least not for any great length of time


We don't have much of a pigeon problem where I live, because it's quite "rural"; I go through about 5 or 6 bushels of shelled corn, and about 250 lbs of sunflower seeds every winter feeding all the red headed wood peckers, and the red birds in my back yard, and the worst problem I have with "unwanted" birds, is the damned starlings; ( which I might add, were not even native to the U.S. until some "stupid schmuck" brought a couple pairs back to this country from England about 75 years ago. ( so if you ever seem to have less starlings than usual, it's because they're all over here ! )

Two winters ago, I was sitting by the window taking some pics of the birds out back, and a half dozen starlings came by; after trying to scare them off for a while, ( with minimal success ), I thought, ( I'll fix your..........'s; ) so I spent half the day rigging up an extension cord from the garage to the back yard, then I took some heavy #12 cable, snipped the insulation off one end about 3 inches, and fastened it on the bird feeder, then had the other end come up to the back window, where I attached it to a spring loaded push button on & off switch, then back to the extension cord.

I had to be very careful not to "zap" any of my red birds, but it wasn't a problem, as they get out of the starlings way. So I sit down and waited for a starling to get on the bare wires, then pushed the button ! "ZAP"! Talk about some "surprised" starlings ! It "solved the problem" for the rest of the day, but it was too "labor intensive" to be of much practical benefit. Incidentally, birds sit on bare power lines all the time, with no ill effect, because they aren't grounded;
it was a whole different story with my little "starling zapper" because the hot wire and the neutral wire were only about 6mm's apart, so when they wrapped there little toes around that thing, they got a nice 140 volt "surprise" !


Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40011 posts, RR: 74
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3509 times:

Pigeons don't bother me.
What bothers me the most are snakes, mosquitoes and rats; in that order.
However I know they serve a purpose in our eco system. What purpose they serve is beyond me but as long as I don' see them than I'm ok.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 4053 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 3465 times:

I find Seagulls to be far more annoying ...

User currently offlinekiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8602 posts, RR: 13
Reply 5, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 3462 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Pigeon tastes wonderful... at least proper pigeon does, I am not so sure about the urban flying rat type of pigeon, but it may be worth looking into.


Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 3462 times:

http://youtu.be/jEjUAnPc2VA

They can cause a nuclear war too  



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4841 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3438 times:

Quoting something (Thread starter):


However, there's a chance pigeons play their role in our eco system. I couldn't find a reliable answer to that question online, but since I live in a rather urban area, have serious doubts their existence is of any use.

Pigeons were never as big a part of the ecosystem as they are now. The reason why they are so populous now is because of humans. Pigeons were previously bred for the purpose of delivering messages (carrier pigeons) after WWI their use was replaced by other forms of communication and so they were released into the wild by humans. Subsequently they returned to their "home" in urban areas and bred like rabbits with the vast availability of food on the ground.

So to answer your question, no we do not need pigeons (at least in urban areas) and I personally think government/councils should make more of an effort to eradicate them as they are most definitely a pest (crap on everything, are a health hazard, make noise nuisance).
Apparently they love aspirin....  



56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlineoldeuropean From Germany, joined May 2005, 2091 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3429 times:

Does mother earth need humans?  


Wer nichts weiss muss alles glauben
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 3414 times:

Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 8):
Does mother earth need humans?  

Great, just when I have my super-jumbo industrial sized rolleyes emoticon at the shop! Extra points for using "mother" earth, instead of just "earth". You'll go far kid.

http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/1999/ROLLEYES.GIF

... anyway, mosquitos, there are too many of them for sure. Pigeons are just a question of city policy, I mean they *can* be put in check, but mosquitos are the worst. Snakes are pretty bad too, but I don't see many of them around my vicinity.

asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 3383 times:

Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 8):
Does mother earth need humans?

Not more or less than it needs pigeons. The earth doesn't need anything. No life, no atmosphere, oxygen, no sunlight. The earth is just one out of countless planets in the universe.

If I understand you right, your problem is with the human attitude of submitting nature to itself. But this is a whole other debate. I am actually a very avid environmentalist. Obviously, the global eco systems would be much more intact if it weren't for humans, but we're here and all we can aim to do is to live in as much of a balance with nature and try to bring us as humans in line with our surroundings. But that has nothing to do with my question.

My question is of what use pigeons are in urban environments and if they even belong there in the first place. From what I could gather, pigeons eat seeds, digest them, and spread them over large areas through their excrements. On the other end of the food chain snakes and certain other avian species eat them. But as there is neither the need for pigeons to spread plant seeds over cities and residential neighborhoods, especially since most of what they eat aren't seeds anyway and that more tolerable bird species do the same job as well, nor do they have any real natural enemies left whose life depends on them, I question their purpose in ''our'' eco system. I'm not even sure they're indigenous to the Northern European clime. But maybe I am overlooking something.. and that is what I am asking.

Do pigeons play any vital role in our natural eco system, or would they in an intact eco system not even exist in these vast numbers due to a scarcity of ressources and natural enemies? Or would they maybe not even exist at all because they aren't indigenous?

I would not get rid of them if they were of use, regardless of my opinion about them. But if they useless or even detrimental, then good riddance!



..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11686 posts, RR: 60
Reply 11, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 3346 times:

Wood pigeons annoy me with their call. However they taste rather nice in a game pie, so I will forgive them.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 2):
That was maybe 52 years ago, and so far I have never succeeded in doing it again.

Could a stray bullet in a fuel farm not have caused fireworks? That would have got all the pigeons there in one go  


Dan  



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3315 times:

Quoting something (Thread starter):
or if they're crucial to the eco system. And I've been wondering the same about pigeons.

Idea!...round up the pidgeons and reposition them into the neighborhoods in London that now have posted signs..."Sharia Law Enforced Neighborhood".


User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3183 times:

[quote=PlymSpotter,reply=11]Could a stray bullet in a fuel farm not have caused fireworks? That would have got all the pigeons there in one go

Dan;

Not to worry ! The whole place was shut down 20 or so years ago, and Texaco no longer markets their products in Ohio.

Even when I worked there, there was nothing in the whole place that would even have been dented by a 22 cal. bullet. The storage tanks were quite thick at the bottoms, and even about 10 to 12 mm thick near the tops.

While I was still working there, we had a huge fire that completely burned down the truck loading rack. It was caused by a ground cable being broken.

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6458 posts, RR: 32
Reply 14, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3129 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 7):
Pigeons were never as big a part of the ecosystem as they are now. The reason why they are so populous now is because of humans. Pigeons were previously bred for the purpose of delivering messages (carrier pigeons) after WWI their use was replaced by other forms of communication and so they were released into the wild by humans. Subsequently they returned to their "home" in urban areas and bred like rabbits with the vast availability of food on the ground.
Quoting something (Reply 10):
My question is of what use pigeons are in urban environments and if they even belong there in the first place.

ZK pilot, just to complement your excellent post and contribute to an answer for something, no, pigeons don´t have much use in urban environments. The reason they live there is:

1. What ZKpilot describes

2. Pigeons descend from a common ancestor that made its nests in naturally tall, cathedral-like structures. Thus, as the urban environment has grown, pigeons have "discovered" that tall buildings or other tall urban structures are identical to what their very simple BUT genetically programmed little brain recognizes as their ideal breeding place. So, they installed themselves in cities and have substituted that environment for where they naturally should be.

I wouldn´t care much about them, if it not for all the crap they spread, which is very damaging to the urban environment. As for disease, I´m not sure they spread anything.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 2):
Here's a "pigeon story" you will just love...............

A similar story but with swallows....

We had a nice Colonial style house in Cuernavaca, Mexico, when I was growing up. One year, suddenly, in the Spring there appeared a couple of swallows´ nests. We all thought it was very cute.

The next Spring we had over 30 nests. We did not think it was that cute anymore.

Then over the next two Springs, the house must have become THE place for the swallows as when my father finally had it with the birds we had counted over 160 nests in the house. I kidd you not.

The problem was that we felt inundated in bird sh** and it was not nice, nor cute anymore. So dad got us both me and my brother a couple of air rifles, over the objections of my mother. We dealt with the problem in one day.

The next Spring we did not let a single swallow set up a nest.


User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3294 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3119 times:

I don't mind pigeons and could care less what they offer or not. Ants, on the other hand, are pests from hell and should be exterminated PRONTO (namely, fire ants and all kinds of ant that sting).


"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3692 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3119 times:

Last week I saw a falcon get the local pigeons in a tizzy when it swooped in to snatch one off my neighbors house, so yes, in this urban environment, they are serving as tasty meals for something.

User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3118 times:

[quote=Superfly,reply=3]What bothers me the most are snakes, mosquitoes and rats; in that order.

[quote=Superfly,reply=3]However I know they serve a purpose in our eco system. What purpose they serve is beyond me but as long as I don' see them than I'm ok.


Superfly................

Mosquitoes are a huge menace to mankind, due to the various diseases they are responsible for causing; It is highly doubtful that we will ever be able to eradicate them though.

Rats are another huge problem, but, were it not for snakes, many areas in the world would simply be "up to their asses in rats"!

All 3,000 or so species of snakes have several things in common; all are predators; with the exception of the marine species, ( which eat fish and marine invertebrates ), most species of snakes prey on small warm blooded mammals; ( such as rats and mice ) there are some species that prey on birds, a few which eat mainly eggs of certain small mammals, a few more that are mainly insectivores, but none are herbivores, ( as some lizards are. ) A few snakes eat mainly.........other snakes! ( the king cobra is almost exclusively a "snake eater" ), and the various species of king snake in the U.S. will eat a mouse, a rat, or a rattlesnake, makes no difference; which in my view, makes them by far, the best, most interesting species there is to keep as a "creature of interest"; ( I don't regard any snake as a "pet" )

The only places where venomous species of snakes cause considerable loss of life to humans is in the warm climate, third world countries where people are very poor, live "on the ground", and where sanitation practices are very poor.
The best example of this is rural India; the general lack of sanitation is responsible for a huge rat population; the cobras and other venomous snakes are simply attracted to the rats, and as nearly everyone in these regions goes barefoot, many people are bitten each year, and many die, again, primarily from lack of adequate medical care, ( and a general lack regard for the potential danger from venomous snakes. )

By far the best protection from being bitten by a venomous snake is to have as much knowledge as possible about the species of snakes one is apt to encounter in the region you live in, and their habits.

About 98% of all venomous snake bites could be avoided, simply by understanding a bit about snakes and their habits.

The sad thing that really "irks" me, is the numerous shows on Discovery channel, etc. about venomous snakes; they are all filmed by very knowledgeable people, but the problem is, these people are in the "entertainment business", and NOT the "education" business. They are all so "confident" in their ability to grab black mambas by the tail, while "controlling" it's body on a snake hook, ( plus the more "chances they take", the more they get for their film........so we end up with an audience of "wannabees" watching this nonsense, and many of them end up "trying this at home", and quite a few end up being bitten by some extremely dangerous species.

The whole area of southeast Asia is NOT a good place to A. go barefoot while hiking in high grass, jungle, etc B. it's also NOT a good idea to handle ANY snake, unless you have a thorough knowledge of the general reptile fauna of the area.

Our friends in Australia have a "problem" that is unique to the whole world, regarding snakes; it's the only country ( or continent ), where the venomous species of snakes far outnumber the non-venomous species. And among these, are about 3 or 4 of the most dangerous species of snakes there are. So if you happen to be in Australia, DO NOT attempt to pick up a 1. Australian brown snake 2. Tiger snake 3. Taipan 4. or a funnel web spider; all can seriously "ruin your day" quite quickly!
( To the best of my knowledge, Australia doesn't have any "venomous pigeons" )

So keep your shoes on when out in the "weeds" Superfly !

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently onlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9660 posts, RR: 31
Reply 18, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 3033 times:

Pigeons are flying rats and they have to be dealt with accordingly.

In pedestrian zones it is a popular game for kids from 4 to 80 to kick pigeons when they come too close to your feet. A hit is usually applauded by bystanders.

The advanced use cars since pigoens have a rather slow reaction.

Not only people from the Middle East enjoy falcons. Some falcons strategically placed on chruch towers in city centres will lower the population of pigeons dramatically.

Falcons should not be used where another popular weapon against pigeons is used, rat poison. The Falcons are simply too valuable.

Greens and other "Gutmenschen" who take a warm shower in the morning, not to forget the shower cap, prefer to substitute pigoen eggs with porcellaine eggs. This leads not only to frustration with the pigeons but gives shower caps a whole different purpose as well.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3014 times:

Quoting Geezer (Reply 17):
due to the various diseases they are responsible for causing

Does the mosquito cause diseases or do they simply transmit them? I am thinking along the lines of malaria and Ross River virus where the mosquito is the agent for carrying the disease from an infected person and injecting it when it bites another person.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 17):
a few which eat mainly eggs of certain small mammals

Would you be thinking of the monotremes: Ornithorhynchus anatinus and Tachyglossus aculeatus? Living in Western Australia I am less familiar with the life-cycle of the former but young of the latter more often fall prey to species of Varanus than they do to snakes.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 17):
To the best of my knowledge, Australia doesn't have any "venomous pigeons"

No, just vexatious ones  All joking aside, Australia has three introduced species, the most widespread of which is Columbia livia. Two others are regular visitors to my garden, the more colourful and graceful Streptopelia senegalensis and S. chinensis. There are 22 endemic species of which my favourite is the spinifex pigeon, Geophaps plumifera. The crested pigeon, Ocyphaps lophotes, has the irritating but slightly amusing habit of flying immediately in front of the car along roads in the Wheatbelt but at least they are not as dangerous as an emu running along the road.

[Edited 2011-08-08 06:41:42]

User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 20, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3004 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 19):
Does the mosquito cause diseases or do they simply transmit them?

It just transmits them, but in some persons it can cause rather concerning allergic reactions.

asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 21, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3000 times:

Quoting something (Thread starter):
But how about pigeons? Do we need 'em?

Fly Merpati
http://www.merpati.co.id/
Where do you want to go?

The big one (with claws) is the Garuda and the little one is a merpati - pigeon.


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2996 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 20):
It just transmits them, but in some persons it can cause rather concerning allergic reactions.

This is what I thought. It is a shame that due to our past understanding of how disease is transmitted, some of the previous efforts at eliminating the carrier could not have been devoted to finding a practical way of eliminating the viruses themselves. There is growing evidence that some of the prophylactic measures we have are becoming less effective. This is not to dismiss the tremendous saving of lives that have occurred through mosquito eradication schemes, but if our current methods of limiting the risk become less effective we will have serious problems in future.


User currently offlineracko From Germany, joined Nov 2001, 4857 posts, RR: 20
Reply 23, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 18):
In pedestrian zones it is a popular game for kids from 4 to 80 to kick pigeons when they come too close to your feet. A hit is usually applauded by bystanders.

In your fantasy world maybe. In reality, thankfully, people will call the cops when they see someone doing that.

And, quite frankly, anybody who enjoys hurting animals just for the fun of it is simply a psychopath. A very common trait in serial murderers or rapists.


User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (3 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2971 times:

Quoting racko (Reply 23):
Quoting PanHAM (Reply 18):
In pedestrian zones it is a popular game for kids from 4 to 80 to kick pigeons when they come too close to your feet. A hit is usually applauded by bystanders.

In your fantasy world maybe.

Bingo. It is clearly a fantasy world. I have yet to see somebody hurting an animal and getting applause for doing so.



I support the right to arm bears
25 einsteinboricua : That is just cruel and to applaud it is even worse. Anyone willing to harm animals like that will have no problem treating a person like that as well
26 PanHAM : Now, only some rambo from the USA is missing who wants to put me in jail for 10 years. No, it's not my phantasie world, it is just a bit of satire. S
27 Baroque : About 30 to 40 years ago, but for quite a long time, on weekends down near the local lighthouse, you would see folk - mostly S European migrants - fi
28 comorin : OP - We need pigeons: There is an old woman who feeds pigeons in front of my apartment building with a huge bag of bread crumbs, and flings the stuff
29 Baroque : Very true, we used to feed a flock of sulphur crested cockatoos (SCCs) that used to land on my office roof just outside the kitchen window. And in no
30 Post contains images comorin : Those must be alpha SCCs! Well, that happens in human society too - now I know where the word 'pecking order' came from
31 Quokka : All too common really. Happens in the chook pen and in the average office, but we tend to have laws against harassment in th workplace now. My own fe
32 iakobos : I'll volunteer to play the pigeon's advocate. My client is the oldest domesticated bird on the planet. His history with humans dates back at least 5,0
33 Zkpilot : I believe Salmonella is one in particular but there are many more I'm sure. Not generally a problem to humans, but pet dogs and cats etc I guess perh
34 Baroque : I thought they were "just" a bit sick, until I realised why that was so. You are telling me that Quokkas rather than flying cockatiels have shades of
35 Baroque : Your client is to be released and the time of his return to his loft registered with the court. But if he poops on my wig just one more time, I will
36 something : I have found the point of my greatest mental acuity to be at night between 2.30-8.30am without having eaten anything in a 12 hours period before that.
37 PanHAM : The Swiss army has them on the inventory as (a rough translation) "Self reproducing messenger systems on biological basis"
38 something : I liked the ''every hit is met by applause'' mental image much better lol
39 PanHAM : Me too, but there seem to be not too many kids on the forum here. I thought about what else the self reproducing messengers could carry but bit my ton
40 Post contains images something : As a kid, I actually did try to kick them away. Not because I wanted to hurt them, but because it was new to me to get that close to birds. Aesthetica
41 NoUFO : I'd like to suggest not to worry about my sense of humor.
42 something : What's with all the hostility? I can't even run over a pigeon with my car, but the idea of a little child kicking a pigeon and people applauding it i
43 PanHAM : I wasn' worried, I was amazed and even more now.
44 Quokka : Yes but, to quote Procol Harum, mine are a whiter shade of grey. LOL. Do they have a part number/ item code? So why the golf club? Pray tell.
45 Post contains links something : I was being sarcastic. I made a joke about being cruel to animals, then emphasized I was just joking, but then jokingly made it sound as if the part
46 Post contains images Quokka : Oh I know which is why I asked the silly question, trying to get into the spirit of things. Spirit? Where's the cognac? I like the response and the a
47 Post contains links Baroque : Time to refer to a short story by a poet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Loaded_Dog Three gold miners named Dave Regan, Jim Bently, and Andy Page a
48 Geezer : [quote=einsteinboricua,reply=25]That is just cruel and to applaud it is even worse. Anyone willing to harm animals like that will have no problem trea
49 einsteinboricua : IIRC, there is a little air force of pigeons in China. They are being trained so that in the event of all-out war and communications are cut off, they
50 Baroque : The mosquito only transmits because it becomes infected. So "just" transmits them is not correct. From Wiki: A mosquito becomes infected when it take
51 zippyjet : Dude, a day without pigeons would be a day without sunshine for gourmands...Ever hear of squab?
52 Geezer : When I was a young child I remember people eating "squab".............never tried any. When I was a little older, maybe 15 or so, my best friend and I
53 Baroque : Doubt if it is recommended. Thinking about it though, I wonder if the lack of seagull "fishing" nowadays is because the police stopped it, or because
54 Geezer : All this talk about pigeons just got me to thinking............................................................ I live on a rural gravel road, surroun
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