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HP To Sell PC Business  
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8190 posts, RR: 8
Posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2643 times:

This was a shock.

Quote:

Hewlett-Packard Co., the world’s largest computer maker, is in talks to buy Autonomy Corp. for about $10 billion and plans to spin off its personal-computer business, people with direct knowledge of the matter said.
http://washpost.bloomberg.com/Story?...3C4QSHD2PKRC5G8CNK3&wpisrc=al_tech

Making it even odder was the release of results showing that Apple had overtaken HP in the Mobile PC business, which is where the profits are.

http://www.displaysearch.com/cps/rde...hare_position_from_hp_in_q2_11.asp

65 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8792 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2617 times:

They should revive the Compaq name, which used to mean something. They were THE brand for portables years ago.


Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinecasinterest From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4487 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2588 times:

Looks like HP is going to the cloud and databases. trying to spin off the low margin PC business that is hampering their growth.


Older than I just was ,and younger than I will soo be.
User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 3, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2537 times:

The problem for not just HP, but essentially for all other PC makers is that making generic Windows boxes can't provide sufficient margins to get anywhere.

Even Lenovo has seen Apple eclipse its total sales in value on its own home turf in greater China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) by now – and they're already using up IBM's discarded PC business at this point.

Apple overtakes Lenovo in China sales - FT.com

There is just no significant value creation in the PC market any more – and if this trend solidifies, this spells trouble for Microsoft as well, since it is in fact Microsoft who's harvesting most of the profit from every PC sold worldwide. The actual manufacturer sees only a fraction of the profits Microsoft does. If the value of these sales continues to erode, revenues and profits for Microsoft will erode with them, and the total market would continue to slide towards the bottom end relative to Apple as the only remaining integrated system manufacturer who will then continue to rake in an even larger part of the total profits made in the industry than it does already.

Given the way the PC market works, do the manufacturers have any viable way out of this scenario? I don't see many options there, particularly in the short-to-medium term.


User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2525 times:

Sell it to Dell and be done with it. Then we can all have awesome or horrible computers, depending on who you ask!


The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 5, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2511 times:

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 4):
Sell it to Dell and be done with it.

Dell is suffering from essentially the same problem. They might turn around if they lost the PC business, but Michael Dell (of "if I was in charge of Apple, I'd shut it down and return the money to the shareholders" fame in 1997) doesn't appear to be quite there yet, possibly due to his non-PC business being weaker than HP's by comparison.


User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 6, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2492 times:

The HP news has another interesting wrinkle to it:

According to the WSJ, HP will also get rid of its mobile device hardware business, but will hold on to the WebOS software and its development.
(Sorry, a.net destroys any attempt to link to the actual article.)

This is clearly in symmetry to Google just acquiring Motorola which has obviously been felt like a punch in the face by Google's Android partners HTC, Samsung et al, who appear to be considering OS alternatives for their handsets and tablet devices.

And so it happens that HP is morphing from a hardware manufacturer into a software & service provider to bring balance to the force, so to say.

That HP's own tablet attempt appears to just have fallen flat (less than 10% sell-through of Best Buy's stock, apparently, not even accounting for returns!) might not exactly instill the greatest of confidence either, but at least HP won't compete with potential licensees any more, other than Google/Motorola.

"Interesting times" in the industry, for sure!


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8190 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2469 times:

It gets even crazier. HP is dropping WebOS and closing out the tablet. With WebOS shut down the WebOS phones will also cease production.

The final point is that HP is in discussions to buy Autonomy for $10 Billion. With 60% being cash.

I can't remember how much HP paid for Compaq, but that was money down the drain, just like the Palm deal apparently is.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
The problem for not just HP, but essentially for all other PC makers is that making generic Windows boxes can't provide sufficient margins to get anywhere.

Even Lenovo has seen Apple eclipse its total sales in value on its own home turf in greater China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) by now – and they're already using up IBM's discarded PC business at this point.

This has also been rolling around in my mind. I can remember when the PC market was still climbing (late 80s or early 90s) and the IBM CEO came out and made it clear that IBM was not in the commodity business and would stay in the PC market only as long as it wasn't a commodity. They jumped early to sell off the division and maximized their profits.

Then the Compaq group maximized their profits in the HP sale.

Question today is who is left to sell a PC company to?


User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5424 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2460 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 7):
It gets even crazier. HP is dropping WebOS and closing out the tablet. With WebOS shut down the WebOS phones will also cease productio

If I read correctly I think they will be continuing to support and own/license WebOS, just letting the wider phone and tablet market make the hardware rather than doing it themselves.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2459 times:

This doesn't include printers does it? HP makes the best!

User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 10, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2452 times:

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 9):
This doesn't include printers does it? HP makes the best!

Wouldn't surprise me if they kept those – printer ink: the most expensive fluid this side of purified endorphins...!   


User currently offlineracko From Germany, joined Nov 2001, 4856 posts, RR: 20
Reply 11, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2419 times:

Well, maybe somebody else will finally build a proper smartphone around the fantastic WebOS.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 6):
This is clearly in symmetry to Google just acquiring Motorola which has obviously been felt like a punch in the face by Google's Android partners HTC, Samsung et al, who appear to be considering OS alternatives for their handsets and tablet devices.

I'm pretty sure the Motorola acquisition was mostly done to armor up for the stupid patent wars. No upside for Google in sidelining HTC & Samsung when it comes to Android development.


User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2411 times:

Quoting racko (Reply 11):
I'm pretty sure the Motorola acquisition was mostly done to armor up for the stupid patent wars. No upside for Google in sidelining HTC & Samsung when it comes to Android development.

Probably by intention, yes. But that is what they actually got in the process, and not by surprise, really.

Google couldn't possible not have known the consequences of acquiring a competitor of their other partners, and one who was in the process of suing those other partners on top of that.

What's the saying? "Out of the frying pan, into the fire!"


User currently offlineFyano773 From Mexico, joined Mar 2004, 784 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2366 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
There is just no significant value creation in the PC market any more – and if this trend solidifies, this spells trouble for Microsoft as well, since it is in fact Microsoft who's harvesting most of the profit from every PC sold worldwide. The actual manufacturer sees only a fraction of the profits Microsoft does. If the value of these sales continues to erode, revenues and profits for Microsoft will erode with them, and the total market would continue to slide towards the bottom end relative to Apple as the only remaining integrated system manufacturer who will then continue to rake in an even larger part of the total profits made in the industry than it does already.

AFAIK, MS main source of revenues is the MS Office suite; corporate users with business desktops and notebooks use it as the primary tool at the office.

MS is also going to the cloud, enterprise services and software such as Dynamics and several other server applications with a common base in the way of SQL Server. Licensing contracts with corporations are also huge for Redmond, so I see MS with a dominant position in the years to come.

About the spin-off of the PC division, it would be interesting how customers react to this action, because many of them usually paired the HP desktops with ProLiant servers in order to have one sole hardware vendor and simplify maintenance, leasing contracts, operations, etc.

Regards...


User currently offlinetravelin man From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3489 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2351 times:

HP is basically going the same route that IBM did. I'd be shocked if they held onto the printer business. The margins there (printer ink aside) are not great, when compared to services, software, and consulting.

User currently offlinestlgph From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 9303 posts, RR: 25
Reply 15, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2338 times:

Quoting racko (Reply 11):
I'm pretty sure the Motorola acquisition was mostly done to armor up for the stupid patent wars.

there's nothing stupid about patents. Intellectual Property is a new trend that Wall Street is waking up to and it's going to bring a lot of value in the coming year or two to a lot of older companies who have seen their stock value plummet. the latest example -- Eastman Kodak.

Quoting travelin man (Reply 14):

HP is basically going the same route that IBM did. I'd be shocked if they held onto the printer business. The margins there (printer ink aside) are not great, when compared to services, software, and consulting.

*ding*

it's pretty much a done deal with Autonomy - just fine lines needed for tax purposes and the papers should be signed.



Eternal darkness we all should dread. It's hard to party when you're dead.
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12345 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2338 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 6):
According to the WSJ, HP will also get rid of its mobile device hardware business, but will hold on to the WebOS software and its development.

I'm not sure why, it's such a tiny player in the market.

Sad to see the end of PalmOS, but they really never did stay competitive as the industry transitioned from PDAs to smartphones.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 6):
And so it happens that HP is morphing from a hardware manufacturer into a software & service provider to bring balance to the force, so to say.

I know some HP engineers and their biggest complaint is that the company has done all it can do to get rid of engineering talent. Everything it can outsource it has outsourced. I have a hard time seeing how they will pull off this kind of transition given the lack of in-house talent.

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 9):
This doesn't include printers does it? HP makes the best!

I don't like HP printers very much.

It seems they don't have a detailed plan for how they are going to go about getting out of the 'PC' business.

I've read they still want to keep making data center servers (just like IBM still does) because they do have a healty enough profit margin.

I've read they want to get rid of consumer PCs, tablets and smartphones.

No word yet on printers.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 24870 posts, RR: 46
Reply 17, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 2323 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 7):
It gets even crazier. HP is dropping WebOS and closing out the tablet. With WebOS shut down the WebOS phones will also cease production.

According to VP at HP they remain committed to webOS

VP Stephen DeWitt, who made it clear that HP will continue work on webOS, with the likely end goal of licensing the OS. He was reportedly “adamant,” saying that “We are not walking away from webOS,” with the goal of having the platform’s future outlined within two weeks. HP VP, Personal Systems Group, pointed out that HP could license webOS, since it’s designed to work on popular Qualcomm chips.

Sounds like some deals are over the horizon, especially the specific mention that the "future outlined within two weeks".


At the end of the day, webOS is a great platform and could possibly reach a much broader audience being licensed as opposed to the currently being on only HP hardware.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8190 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2305 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 17):
At the end of the day, webOS is a great platform and could possibly reach a much broader audience being licensed as opposed to the currently being on only HP hardware.

I'm glad to see that they are keeping something going from the Palm investment.

As for the future, what type of markets would it be attractive to?

Mobile computing is going to be a battle between MS. Google and Apple. If Google and/or Apple brings their mobile and desktop OSes together that is going to put on a lot more pressure on the market.

A lot of industrial markets (like Medical) are fairly well set.

I'll look forward to some positive news on HP before too long.


User currently offlineCadet985 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 1551 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2302 times:

This blows. I love my HP laptop, and was planning on HP being the maker of my next laptop. Now, it looks like I'll have the following choices: Dell (crap), Lenovo (know nothing about them), or Acer (complete garbage). I wouldn't even consider using an Apple laptop if Steve Jobs showed up on my doorstep, put one in my hands, and paid me to use it.

Marc


User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 24870 posts, RR: 46
Reply 20, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2292 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 18):
As for the future, what type of markets would it be attractive to?

I suppose by licensing to a broad set of clients from consumer to industrial users.

One of HPs strengths is its huge corporate client base. It could certainly embed webOS into various applications and platforms is markets and sells itself in that arena.

It seems to be the place in the market for Apple and Google OS is set, the current battle is for a 3rd platform spot with webOS and Win7 being the two contenders. With my experience with both it should not be a battle at all except for the heavy weight market presence MS can throw around in trying to keep its platform alive.

Quoting Cadet985 (Reply 19):
This blows. I love my HP laptop, and was planning on HP being the maker of my next laptop.

And there likely will be HP laptops for a while to come.

The headline today is...

H.P. Weighs Spinning Off Its PC Unit
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/19/te...ift-toward-business-customers.html

Some pertinent quotes for you...

In a sweeping change for Hewlett-Packard, Leo Apotheker, the technology giant’s chief executive, said Thursday that he was considering spinning off the company’s personal computer business into a separate company...

and

H.P. said it would take 12 to 18 months to decide what to do with the PC unit. Meanwhile, it will continue to run the business as usual.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinenighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5126 posts, RR: 34
Reply 21, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2210 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
There is just no significant value creation in the PC market any more – and if this trend solidifies, this spells trouble for Microsoft as well, since it is in fact Microsoft who's harvesting most of the profit from every PC sold worldwide. The actual manufacturer sees only a fraction of the profits Microsoft does. If the value of these sales continues to erode, revenues and profits for Microsoft will erode with them

Quite the opposite actually - this is good news for Microsoft. While revenue from PC sales has dropped, the actual number of units shipped has increased, this is due to falling costs per unit. It has been Microsoft's aim since the beginning to commoditise the PC hardware market, doing so causes the price per unit to fall, leading to more units selling. This means more sales of Windows, and more revenue for Microsoft.



That'll teach you
User currently onlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21412 posts, RR: 54
Reply 22, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2176 times:

Quoting Fyano773 (Reply 13):
AFAIK, MS main source of revenues is the MS Office suite; corporate users with business desktops and notebooks use it as the primary tool at the office.

Windows licensing is the other big profit source for MS. Pretty much everything else is marginal or losing money.

Quoting Fyano773 (Reply 13):
MS is also going to the cloud, enterprise services and software such as Dynamics and several other server applications with a common base in the way of SQL Server.

How many companies actually make money with that kind of scheme?

Quoting Revelation (Reply 16):
I'm not sure why, it's such a tiny player in the market.

Sad to see the end of PalmOS, but they really never did stay competitive as the industry transitioned from PDAs to smartphones.

It could get significant pretty quickly if one or more o the larger hardware makers should ditch Android for it after Google's Motorola stunt.

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 18):
Mobile computing is going to be a battle between MS. Google and Apple.

Google is still in a rather precarious situation there; The Motorola acquisition doesn't really help them out of that; In some ways it makes it worse.

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 21):
Quite the opposite actually - this is good news for Microsoft. While revenue from PC sales has dropped, the actual number of units shipped has increased, this is due to falling costs per unit. It has been Microsoft's aim since the beginning to commoditise the PC hardware market, doing so causes the price per unit to fall, leading to more units selling. This means more sales of Windows, and more revenue for Microsoft.

The number of units is in recession right now (with only Apple bucking that trend), and worse than that, the upper high-margin segment is increasingly lost to PC makers as they continue their journey to the bottom of the barrel. With Windows increasingly turning into a second-rate commodity product in public perception, margin pressure at the manufacturers will in turn put pressure on Microsoft's margins as well. They've already felt it with the netbooks, and with growing desperation among the manufacturers, at some point they might even give Linux another shot, which is about the worst that could happen from Microsoft's point of view.


User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13040 posts, RR: 12
Reply 23, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2168 times:

The consumer PC, related tablets and phone markets are so price competitive and expensive to run that the profits are not there or too thin. Compound that with the many problems with Microsoft software they have always had, the difficulty to use it, the ease for it to be corrupted by hackers and it's no wonder few want to be makers of the equipment to the consumer.

Sadly, I expect another product line ownership move from a USA based company to a Chinese one, much like almost all of the manufacturing of computers and related equipment have been shifted to there.


User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7137 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (2 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2168 times:

Quoting Cadet985 (Reply 19):
Now, it looks like I'll have the following choices

What about Sony, Samsung, LG, Fujitsu, Toshiba?

[Edited 2011-08-19 03:41:19]

25 NIKV69 : I've found them to be probably the best out there. I hope they stick around.
26 StuckInCA : I highly recommend Sony. They aren't always fully price competitive but I think they are (generally) nicer than Dell, Toshiba and HP in my opinion.
27 Acheron : Gotta love the Apple crowd. "Tis because PC sucks and Apple rulz!!!!11111" "PC are so generic and so uncool, I love my Apple/fashion statement!"
28 melpax : Don't forget that HP also owns what was known as EDS - now called HP enterprise solutions. They must be making a bucket load from that side of the bus
29 LAXintl : Yea if they can properly figure out how to integrate it, and do something with it. The EDS acquisition was far from smooth, with entire divisions sti
30 Revelation : With respect to cloud, I don't think many, but it seems they all are trying. Just go to a job search web site (indeed.com is my favorite) and search
31 Ken777 : How about an iPad? You need to remember that most of the Mac users today were PC users that had a reason for changing. Mine was the fact that the out
32 ALTF4 : You're kidding, right? I work with that group every day - they do a good job and the whole section of the company seems to do well. I know they have
33 KiwiRob : I would say that in some parts of the world NCR took over the service and support of Dell products, they did a much better job of it than Dell did.
34 Post contains links Ken777 : It only gets worse for HP as the market is downgrading them: http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderd...-autonomy-bid-massively-expensive/ I can see the d
35 Post contains links Klaus : They've apparently earmarked the respective sum for a complete writeoff of the tablets (any residual sales sure wouldn't hurt, but they're not counti
36 par13del : Yes, go talk to Apple. What I thought when readig the initial article was that this massive change was based on the desires of one individual, certai
37 Dreadnought : Actually they share manufacturers. Notebooks are nearly all made by specialized manufacturers. Dell, Apple, Sony do not make their own notebooks as f
38 Cadet985 : Honestly, I have no use for an iPad at all. I can browse the internet on my phone (Android), and I read on my Kindle. I have an iPod that I haven't u
39 Klaus : Highly unlikely. When they installed an explicit software & services guy with no hardware experience at the top, that die had already been cast b
40 Ken777 : My original HP calculator in '70 was a handheld with small little red lights for the display. It was quality and they charged for it. About $100 IIRC
41 StuckInCA : I'm well aware. I'm not sure exactly who makes Sony's but I'm sure they make lots of others. That said... This--> I've owned HP, Dell and Sony lap
42 Revelation : Indeed. That calculator is probably 30 years old, and a lot changes in that amount of time. I remember when IBM hired a cigarettes and biscuits guy,
43 Siren : I'm going to have to echo the sentiment of some users here: this blows. I use an HP laptop, well, two in fact as my main systems - and there are only
44 Revelation : I tend to buy top-of-the-line laptops and keep them for a long time, because technology doesn't change that fast in laptops. and because of the hassl
45 type-rated : Those ThinkPads were pretty robust when IBM made them and the newer ones by Lenovo are pretty much the same. I had an IBM ThinkPad and a Lenovo ThinkP
46 Aesma : I'm not sure what Apple is doing in this thread, as their business model is totally different, but I was surprised by the numbers talked about (mobile
47 Post contains images Klaus : For many people the iPad serves the same purposes their laptops or desktops did previously or it supplements them. So why should it be excluded from
48 Revelation : I have to agree. For many, the iPad is just an ultrathin notebook with touchscreen or voice input, and that fulfills what they want from either a pri
49 Klaus : There's no indication of that actually happening (yet?). Shipments to stores are already relatively low numbers and sell-through to actual customers
50 Aesma : I never really believed in WebOS, not based on its merits but on it being backed up by HP, and now that it seems all but abandoned, I doubt it will ha
51 Klaus : Both viewing them apart and together provides different kinds of information – both perspectives are valid in their own way, but if you want to kno
52 Post contains links Revelation : The tablet market is quite young. With time, the Apple 'wow' factor will ware off, and other types of innovation will come forward. Not sure where yo
53 Ken777 : For mobile computing it is the same as a laptop. We just got home from Dallas and the wife's iPad is all we took. And it will be all we take when we
54 Revelation : HP? HP may have had funding going for it, but not much more. Here's a snip to save me some typing: HP may have been an agile, innovative company 30 y
55 Klaus : No, it's not. It has been stagnating along for the past several decades, and definitely not for lack of trying! It just got its first smash hit at it
56 Post contains images Klaus : Yes, it would be unusual, but looking at the iPod, not really unprecedented. And given the developments of recent years, I'd say the chances for that
57 Revelation : I think Android at its best pulls togeher a lot of software and hardware innovation. It's hard to think how Apple can have a monopoly on innovation.
58 ltbewr : HP has a long history in the computer business, going back to the late 1960's, making 'mini-mainframes' for mid-sized businesses and engineering work.
59 RGElectra80 : Remember HP calculators? Can they make those cool again? HP calculators were, bar none, some of the best right up there with Texas Instruments when I
60 Revelation : Certainly in the consumer space. In the enterprise space, it seems most corporate IT departments limit themselves to a few key primary vendors so the
61 PhilGil : As someone who just ordered a fire sale TouchPad this was my thinking: The TouchPad was a crappy product at $500. Apple owns the premium tablet space
62 geekydude : It is THE best product at $99 dollars though. For the price of one Ipad, you get 5 TouchPads for the entire family.
63 Ken777 : I believe that smart directors will be looking for something besides the newest hardware design to put against Apple. Even having an OS isn't the ans
64 Post contains links LAXintl : Rumor that Samsung is looking to buy the WebOS from HP. Could be a good match as Samsung has turned out to be a strong hardware maker with line of sma
65 Post contains images Centre : Hopefully Google will step up their competition with the Chrome OS...Google just need to get it right and extensive, rather than a web based OS. I se
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