Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Arab States Want To Invade Syria?  
User currently offlinekaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12516 posts, RR: 35
Posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1961 times:

In an interesting - potentially explosive - development, Arab States (led by Qatar and Saudi Arabia) - have voiced support for a plan for direct involvement in Syria.

http://news.sky.com/home/world-news/article/16176096

Quite apart from the significance of Arab states taking this stance, there are significant issues to be discussed here:

1. On the regional chessboard, this has the potential to isolate Iran; how will it react? Saudi Arabia is too big to hit, but Qatar ...?
2. How would the mechanics of this work; would Iraq and/or Jordan allow Saudi troops to cross its borders, or even participate; I could see Jordan being involved, but given the ability of Iran to make life very difficult for Iraq, if it put its mind to it, I couldn't see Iraq being involved (although it could probably be persuaded to turn a blind eye to the use of its airspace?)
3. What's the goal here? What kind of a government would the Wahhabist Saudi authorities want to put in place. Like Iraq, Syria - although very repressive - was not as hardline about the repression of women as Saudi Arabia is; what would it gain from this?
4. How would Israel feel about this; somehow I don't see the Arab League phoning Netanyahu for his views, although I can't think that Israel would object greatly to Assad being bounced out on his rear end.
5. How long would the Syrian army be able to hold out against KSA and other Arab states; could this actually be an "all-Arab" affair?

In the context of the whole Middle East situation, a very interesting development; it will be interesting to see Iran's response to this.

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinejohns624 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 926 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

I believe that they want the UN or NATO involved to do the "real" fighting.

User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1903 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

They want to send forces to defend the civilians, that is not similar to an invasion.


I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineGiancavia From Vatican City, joined Feb 2010, 1384 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1896 times:

None of them will invade, All no balls nations who purchased military equiptment to control their own populations. Which one of them can lecture the Syrians on the way its treating its population without looking at itself as a major hypocrite?

Bahrain? Saudi? Yeah right..

Realisticly it will drag on a little longer.. Then the Russians/Chinese will be influenced to exert a little pressure and it will die down but probably continue at a level where the rest of the world fails to care.

I would be surprised if it ended differently.


User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 4, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1892 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Giancavia (Reply 3):
Realisticly it will drag on a little longer.. Then the Russians/Chinese will be influenced to exert a little pressure and it will die down but probably continue at a level where the rest of the world fails to care

Well then i suggest you go there as a reporter and lets see if your if this is the ending you predicted.
Just like to remind you that the number of killed people so far is over 12,000.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineGiancavia From Vatican City, joined Feb 2010, 1384 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1882 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 4):
Well then i suggest you go there as a reporter and lets see if your if this is the ending you predicted.
Just like to remind you that the number of killed people so far is over 12,000.

What would me going there as a reporter achieve exactly? I dont even understand your point to be honest..
I dont remember denying large numbers of people have died or condoned it. I said what I see happening, No Arab states will invade.. Be realistic.. and none of those states have a leg to stand on when they shoot people protesting in their own countries. What gives them the moral highground? Fewer innocent people killed? heh..


User currently onlinemercure1 From French Polynesia, joined Jul 2008, 1603 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1877 times:

What I find quite bizarre is the lack of will, or care about Syria until only recently compared to Libya.

Things in Libya were no where as bad the as mass slaughter day after day of civilians by the Syrian government but the world has chosen to mostly look the other way for the last 12-months.

Pretty amazing what the lure, or in this case lack of petrol does....


User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1415 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1867 times:

Quoting mercure1 (Reply 6):
Things in Libya were no where as bad the as mass slaughter day after day of civilians by the Syrian government but the world has chosen to mostly look the other way for the last 12-months.

Pretty amazing what the lure, or in this case lack of petrol does....

The reason why nobody wants to go into Syria is that, unlike in Libya, there is not a cohesive opposition force with clear leadership. The Libyans were organised and pretty clear in their objectives- they just needed a bit of a helping hand, which was why the war was quick and relatively easy. Not so in Syria where the opposition is divided and unclear in its aims. Civil war is the likely outcome.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 8, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1867 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Giancavia (Reply 5):
I dont remember denying large numbers of people have died or condoned it. I said what I see happening, No Arab states will invade..

Well you never acknowledge it, and by comparing what is happening in Bahrain with Syria you are putting 24= over 12,000
And when was the last time when KSA used it's F15 or there naval forces or even tanks to kill there own people?
Again the Arab armies will go there to set a buffer zone between the civilians and the Syrian army, it happened before in Lebanon.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineGiancavia From Vatican City, joined Feb 2010, 1384 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1859 times:

Quoting mercure1 (Reply 6):
Pretty amazing what the lure, or in this case lack of petrol does....

I think the lack of "petrol" is irrelevant on this one. Russia has Military bases in Syria & a Veto. Until its influenced enough with other sweetners to convince Assad to stop I think it will continue. There is not alot people can do otherwise.. As per usual just talk talk talk and watch people die unfortunately.

At most I think you may see the Saudis or the Americans arm the "rebels" but look how that has turned out in Libya.


User currently offlineGiancavia From Vatican City, joined Feb 2010, 1384 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1851 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 8):
Well you never acknowledge it, and by comparing what is happening in Bahrain with Syria you are putting 24= over 12,000
And when was the last time when KSA used it's F15 or there naval forces or even tanks to kill there own people?
Again the Arab armies will go there to set a buffer zone between the civilians and the Syrian army, it happened before in Lebanon.

I am a Human being.. I dont need to acknowledge that civilians being bombed or murdered is a bad thing.. it should be expected anyone would find that disgusting naturally.

Numbers are irrelevant.. on a global polotical scale. How can Bahrain lecture about innocent civilians being killed when it killed its own unarmed people that were protesting? They have zero credibility making their statements look hypocritical. Same with Saudi and its Human rights.. how can these voices carry any weight when they dont practice what they preach?

There will be no buffer zone dude..
Not until the minds of the Russians are changed.


User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 11, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1843 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Giancavia (Reply 10):
There will be no buffer zone dude..
Not until the minds of the Russians are changed.

When you send an army to be a buffer zone you need the approval of both sides, no?
Here where Russia should play a role, that is if they value human life more than a couple of bases.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6481 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1779 times:

There are a few geopolitical issues:

1. Russian naval bases are at stake.

2. Iranian oil for China is at stake.

3. One day the Russians would like to see payment for their weapons deliveries. A new Syrian government is unlikely to consider payment for the weapons used against themselves to be a high priority issue.

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 2):
They want to send forces to defend the civilians, that is not similar to an invasion.
Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 8):
...the Arab armies will go there to set a buffer zone between the civilians and the Syrian army...

When Syrian military is shelling cities from its outskirts, then creation of a buffer zone means invasion and war. No more, no less. I don't see any relevant countries which are able to do that.

The most sensible proposal I have seen is from Turkey: To create border-zone refugee camps. Even if doing nothing more than that most likely means that Syria digs itself deeper into the swamp of Somalia, Sudan and such over the next few years or even decades. Or like Congo in the 60'es, 70'es and 80'es, and still not fully solved.

It is hard to be an optimist. Only one thing is sure: Syria will never be the same again. That said, they have always left a lot of room for improvement.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5724 posts, RR: 19
Reply 13, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1768 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 11):
Here where Russia should play a role, that is if they value human life more than a couple of bases.

Russia is fully supporting Asad, because Putin is a politican of the same breed and one day he might find himself in Asad's shoes. And as far as "valuing human life" is concerned... that has never been too high on the priority list over there. There really is not that much difference between carpet bombing of Grozny and shelling of Homs.

Quoting Giancavia (Reply 10):
How can Bahrain lecture about innocent civilians being killed when it killed its own unarmed people that were protesting? They have zero credibility making their statements look hypocritical.

How can Arab League send a mission of "observers" to Syria only to appoint gen. Al-Dabi, a founder of the Sudanese genocidal janjaweed militias, as its head? I bet someone like him would not notice any wrongdoing even standing in the middle of the courtyard at Tuol Sleng circa 1977ish.
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...rst_human_rights_observer?page=0,1


User currently offlinetu204 From Russia, joined Mar 2006, 1249 posts, RR: 18
Reply 14, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1660 times:

Quoting L410Turbolet (Reply 13):
Russia is fully supporting Asad, because Putin is a politican of the same breed and one day he might find himself in Asad's shoes. And as far as "valuing human life" is concerned... that has never been too high on the priority list over there. There really is not that much difference between carpet bombing of Grozny and shelling of Homs.

Russia and China are supporting Assad because he is the head of Syria and because we have had enough NATO meddling in the affairs of foreign countries. Might I remind Libya? How is it going for them by the way?
As far as valuing human life? Well look at the situation is Syria. It is not all coming from one side. The Russian draft resolution is more than reasonable: Condemming violet actions coming from BOTH SIDES. Or do you think only the military there is doing the shooting?



I do not dream about movie stars, they must dream about me for I am real and they are not. - Alexander Popov
User currently offlinecedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 8142 posts, RR: 54
Reply 15, posted (2 years 7 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1642 times:

Poor Syria. I was arrested in Damascus in 2008 for flying a roundtrip on a Yak-40 to Deirezzor, there-and-back. Understandably suspicious but me and my buddy spent about six hours being questioned by these truly evil guys who spoke German, trained by the Stazi you see, and after that experience we could see exactly how this benighted country functioned, and these spooks were EVERYWHERE. One guy came up to us on the beach the next day and started asking us casually about every topic we had discussed in our hotel room the previous night and was so sexually predatory that I was genuinely afraid of him. Leaving the country on our last day, in the international departures area of DAM airport, again, spooks everywhere, even a couple from foreign intel services (tie clips, lapel pins), these people with genuine evil in their hearts watching the crowds. The airport itself was a total disgrace, LED signs above each desk intended to show destinations, all broken, with handwritten, even MISSPELLED names on pieces of paper scotch taped over them. Baggage belts were all broken as well. It felt like air travel in Europe would a few years after a limited nuclear exchange, a wrecked system trying to get on it's feet and failing.

I felt sick thinking about what would happen if any of the guys who oversaw this system would do if they really got their hands on you. The Syrian secret police have invented and perfected more torture devices and methods than a medieval lord. I see tu-204's point about the world being sick of NATO interventions and I don't support one in this case but Assad and his crowd have to go.

Syria is different to Libya in two major ways, one is that the rebels in Libya had Benghazi, whereas in Syria there is no real rebel stronghold. I doubt Assad has many fans in Homs but it's hardly able to function as a capital in waiting, or even function at all - and it isn't a port city. The other big difference is Syria's strategic importance to the Russians. The Russians have NUKES in Syria, for god's sake. Their naval base in Tartous is their only base outside the CIS. It would be a strategic disaster for them if (when) Assad falls.

Re civil war, yep, this will be fought to the last man. If the rebels lose this, they know will all end up facing firing squads if they're lucky and in Assad's torture dungeons if they're unlucky. And equally, if the government spooks up to and including Assad himself lose this, they know they will hang from lampposts if they're lucky and in their own torture dungeons if they're unlucky. There is no going back now.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):
I can't think that Israel would object greatly to Assad being bounced out on his rear end.

God, you're joking, the Israelis LOVE undemocratic dictators. Why do you think the US gave Mubarrak billions of dollars in "aid" each year? These guys (Mubarrak, King Hussein of Jordan, Assad, Ben Ali et al) kept their populations under the kosh and were never going to do anything to risk their power by embarking on a risky (indeed suicidal) escalation with Israel. If Arabs vote, they will vote for Arab interests, not Israeli / US interests.

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 2):
They want to send forces to defend the civilians, that is not similar to an invasion.

Correct, sending in soldiers to keep two warring factions apart is not an invasion. What the US / UK did to Iraq is an invasion - attacking a united and non-expansionist country and decapitating the leadership, wiping out a tonne of civilians, that's an invasion. And no, there will be no intervention in Syria, see Russia, strategic position, above.



fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineMillwallSean From Singapore, joined Apr 2008, 1269 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1505 times:

I really like west Syria, its a great place to be a tourist.
But Assads regime is a bad one, a full dictatorship and not a pleasant one at all with a real bad arse security police.
the time for such regimes are up. But the gulf states isn't much better and it would be ironical to see them intervene in Syria stating they want people power...

Bahrain percentage wise isn't much different than Syria. But the war in a few cities in Syria is probably worse than what we ever saw in Bahrain.
But Bahrain is not sustainable, you cant oppress 75% of the population for decades and expect them to be happy about it. the shias will eventually be powerful enough to topple the leaders of Bahrain.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):

1. On the regional chessboard, this has the potential to isolate Iran; how will it react? Saudi Arabia is too big to hit, but Qatar ...?

Isolate Iran, Irans positions in the region is stronger than it has been for 30 years. Iraq isn't an enemy but today a rather close ally. Hezbollah took on Israel rather successful in Lebanon.
Iran has caused severe internal problems in Yemen and Bahrain. They have established a powerbase in Afghanistan. Its eastern border with Pakistan is calmer than its been for the last 2 decades. Pakistan doesn't allow any anti iran organisations to use baloch territory and the border to afghanistan is secured by friendly relations.
Iran is stronger and less vulnerable in the middle east now than before.
these days troops have to come across water to get at Iran.

Saudi isn't strong enough to invade Syria.mainly because they don't have the troops that's up for it. The usage of ex pakistani special forces only works if the Saudis dare to allow ex pakistani officers and Saudi don't. The Pakistanis are good soldiers but their Saudi officers that always have to be in charge of them are questionable at best?
the Saudis haven't exactly been excellent in Yemen and Syria is a lot tougher than Yemen ever will be.

Add on a Russian navalbase largely symbolic but still and no Saudi wont step in there. Not powerful enough to do so.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):
2. How would the mechanics of this work; would Iraq and/or Jordan allow Saudi troops to cross its borders, or even participate; I could see Jordan being involved, but given the ability of Iran to make life very difficult for Iraq, if it put its mind to it, I couldn't see Iraq being involved (although it could probably be persuaded to turn a blind eye to the use of its airspace?)

Iraq has a shia controlled government and is very close to Iran in its policies. Its rulers spent most of the Saddam years free of charge in Iran. Most respectable websites and poundits refer to Iraq as Irans new best friend in the middle east and that's for a reason. See iraq's votes in the UN over the last 12 months for example. or even simpler see what Iraq voted on the Syria resolution...
Iraq wont allow anything in Syria unless Iran agrees to it. Iraq isn't a Iran puppet but they are as close as the US and Israel.
Jordan are fearful of to much Saudi influence. They would prefer not to and Jordan would only allow it when they realised all others supported it.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):
3. What's the goal here? What kind of a government would the Wahhabist Saudi authorities want to put in place. Like Iraq, Syria - although very repressive - was not as hardline about the repression of women as Saudi Arabia is; what would it gain from this?

Syria is ruled by the alawites a sort of shiite offspring. They are pitted against the majority sunnis. Saudi will do a lot to topple the alawites. the alawites in Syria sees full support from the other minorities that also remember what it was like to live under a sunni controlled Damascus.
if the Saudis sent their troops int hey would just like they demand everytime they fund a mosque abroad that they adhere to their form of islam. a very strict one and the rulers they put in would be conservatives to put it mildly.
Syria is diverse, you can drink beer at restaurants and see some of the sexiest women around on the streets. lets hope that Syria can continue to create its own identity rather than a Bedouin Saudi one.
The christians, kurds, druze and alawites (plus a few more small cultures) or about 25% of the county's population will support the present government to the last drop of blood. Remember the father of Assad went against a Saudi sponsored muslim brotherhood uprising 2 decades ago in a very bloody campaign. probably the bloodiest and only successful crushing of a national islamist group in the middle east north Africa. he more or less levelled the city where they were HQ:d though...
The opposition in Syria is very fragmented and even though some gulf states will support them financially and with weapons they will have a very hard sell to convince the people of Syria of their great intentions. Assad has a power base, Ghaddafi didn't, and last time the sunnis rules Syria all minorities were severely restricted. The minorities remember this all to well.
The Syrian army is mainly made up of the minorities and Russia supplies it with weapons so does Iran.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):
4. How would Israel feel about this; somehow I don't see the Arab League phoning Netanyahu for his views, although I can't think that Israel would object greatly to Assad being bounced out on his rear end.

Israel has nothing to loose here. They can get rid of Assad. Not that he or Syria is a threat to Israel but he does support some of Israels worst enemies.
Israel if they play their card rights can only gain from agreeing to what the west and the arab states says. Better stay out of it, observe and later reap praise for doing little. Besides Iran needs to divert more attention to Syria right now, that can never be bad for Israel.

Quoting kaitak (Thread starter):
5. How long would the Syrian army be able to hold out against KSA and other Arab states; could this actually be an "all-Arab" affair?

Syrian army can hold out a long, long time against a pure gulfstate invention.
If the west lent air support it might be different. But a gulfstate invention wouldn't be popular in the western parts of Syria and we would likely see a guerilla war. To be honest I wouldn't wanna see the gulf states armies walk into the christian maronite, druze or alawite homelands. That would be bloody indeed and would destabilise the entire region. Im not sure Israel has to much to win rom a destabilised Syria, lex Lebanon...
The Country that can take out Syrias regime is Turkey to the north.



No One Likes Us - We Dont Care.
User currently offlineAcheron From Spain, joined Sep 2005, 1672 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1433 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 2):
They want to send forces to defend the civilians, that is not similar to an invasion.

Thats one heck of a spin right there.

The most amusing part was reading about the Saudi Arabia foreign relationships' minister thinking it was an "excellent idea" to give weapons to the syrian population.

I think I agree with him. As long as we give weapons to the shia minority in Saudi Arabia as well to make things even.

Saudi Arabia should really STFU and keep their hands to themselves. Particularly when its notorious they like to play the terrorism sponsorship game as well.


User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 18, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1247 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Acheron (Reply 17):
think I agree with him. As long as we give weapons to the shia minority in Saudi Arabia as well to make things even.

Saudi Arabia should really STFU and keep their hands to themselves. Particularly when its notorious they like to play the terrorism sponsorship game as well.

KSA will be helping the Sunni majority to get there freedom from the dictatorship of the minority Alawites.
KSA will do whatever it takes to help the civilians in Syria. I do not know how people can stay indifferent when a 6 square miles in Homs has been shelled with tanks, missiles, heavy machine guns and helicopters for the last 24 days so far.
Yeh here we go with the terrorism accusation, when there is no real argument to offer there is always this, whatever,
The people of Syria need help and they will be free sooner than later.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineba6590 From UK - England, joined Jul 2007, 132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1231 times:

What people fail to realise that the opposition over the past few months has been doing there own share of sectarian killing. Many Alawites have been kidnapped, raped, and murdered.
I am not supporting the Assad regime, and I never will. I grew up in Homs, and I would love to see a democratic Syria.
Unfortunately that will not happen if Assad falls.
What we will end up with is a Sunni led government, which will try to impose its medieval customs on what up till now has been a fairly secular country.

I would love to see Assad fall, I would love to see a democratic Syria. I just don't see it happening.



"Never forget, the higher we soar, the smaller we appear to those who cannot fly" - Nietzsche -
User currently offlineAcheron From Spain, joined Sep 2005, 1672 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1181 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 18):
KSA will be helping the Sunni majority to get there freedom from the dictatorship of the minority Alawites.

And who will help the shia minority of saudi arabia from the oppresion of the wahabi nutjobs that rule the country?.

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 18):
Yeh here we go with the terrorism accusation, when there is no real argument to offer there is always this, whatever,

Yeah, I'm pretty sure Saudi Arabia's effort to export wahabism through whatever means necesary its a made up argument.

Sorry, but noone buys the idea you want to go there "for the people". No one joins a war just for the good of the people of a country unless they have something else to gain.
And a country run by fucktards like Saudi Arabia is no different.


User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 21, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1158 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Acheron (Reply 20):
Sorry, but noone buys the idea you want to go there "for the people". No one joins a war just for the good of the people of a country unless they have something else to gain.
And a country run by fucktards like Saudi Arabia is no different.

Well it seems that human suffering, lack of food and medical help, humanitarian goals is beyond some people understanding, that's not the fault of KSA, those people need to look deep inside them maybe they one day can understand and share in helping.
BTW if this army becomes a fact it will include forces from a coalition of Arab countries not only Saudi.

Quoting Acheron (Reply 20):
And who will help the shia minority of saudi arabia from the oppresion of the wahabi nutjobs that rule the country?.

The Shia minority need not protection in there homeland, unless you are talking about those few who are agents of the Iranian trouble makers.
I also find that your name calling of my country offensive but with you that is not surprising, when you feel that you are loosing an argument insults start showing up.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineAcheron From Spain, joined Sep 2005, 1672 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1098 times:

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 21):
Well it seems that human suffering, lack of food and medical help, humanitarian goals is beyond some people understanding, that's not the fault of KSA, those people need to look deep inside them maybe they one day can understand and share in helping.

So, when will the charitable, noble and humanitarian(LOL) Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is going to start helping, I don't know, the people of Sudan, or Burkina Faso which last time I checked has also oppressed people.

Or how about Bahrain?. The noble and humanitarian Kingdom of Saudi Arabia actually sent troops but it wasn't exactly to help the bahraini people, was it?.

Quoting Acheron (Reply 20):
The Shia minority need not protection in there homeland, unless you are talking about those few who are agents of the Iranian trouble makers.

Lol, sure they don't. I guess it is a lie they don't even enjoy the same rights that sunni muslims...

Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 21):
I also find that your name calling of my country offensive but with you that is not surprising, when you feel that you are loosing an argument insults start showing up.

Not really insulting your country but its King and the other people ruling it.
And to be honest, I find it more insulting the fact that you think the rest of us are idiots who buy into the notion that the KSA wants to invade Syria just to help people and not just mere powerplay to stablish a wahabi foothold within the iranian(and Russian, so you could say that KSA is also doing the US' dirty job) sphere of influence.

The powerplay against the Iranian just happens to have nice side effect PR wise that makes the KSA look like "the savior of Syrian people" which is a load of crap.


User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 23, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 1066 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Acheron (Reply 22):
And to be honest, I find it more insulting the fact that you think the rest of us are idiots who buy into the notion that the KSA wants to invade Syria just to help people

The idiots as you put it are the people who do not understand the difference between invasion and humanitarian purposes at no time KSA is interested in invading Syria.

Quoting Acheron (Reply 22):
Lol, sure they don't. I guess it is a lie they don't even enjoy the same rights that sunni muslims

Do you have any proof that they don't, or is it the Iranian propaganda that you only listen to?

Quoting Acheron (Reply 22):
Not really insulting your country but its King and the other people ruling it.

When somebody insult the king he insults my country and myself.

Quoting Acheron (Reply 22):
The powerplay against the Iranian just happens to have nice side effect PR wise that makes the KSA look like "the savior of Syrian people" which is a load of crap.

If you call over 12000 dead, 50000 injured, millions starving crap then there is no reason to continue this useless discussion



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlinepar13del From Bahamas, joined Dec 2005, 7377 posts, RR: 8
Reply 24, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1007 times:

Quoting mercure1 (Reply 6):
What I find quite bizarre is the lack of will, or care about Syria until only recently compared to Libya.

Things in Libya were no where as bad the as mass slaughter day after day of civilians by the Syrian government but the world has chosen to mostly look the other way for the last 12-months.

You answered you own questions with the last line below.

Quoting mercure1 (Reply 6):
Pretty amazing what the lure, or in this case lack of petrol does....
Quoting SOBHI51 (Reply 11):
When you send an army to be a buffer zone you need the approval of both sides, no?
Here where Russia should play a role, that is if they value human life more than a couple of bases.

How and why would the Russians and the Syrian govermnent allow the creation of a safe zone area for a defined opposition to take shape and set down roots, unless it was a ploy to get them all in one area to get rid of them?

As mentioned by others, there is no clearly defined opposition movement in Syria, which makes it difficult for third parties to get involved, allowing the creation of a buffer or safe zone to allow creation of such an opposition is not in the best interest of those in power or their supporters.


User currently offlinetu204 From Russia, joined Mar 2006, 1249 posts, RR: 18
Reply 25, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 990 times:

Interesting video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDTjR...g-all&context=G24f4fedFAAAAAAAAIAA



I do not dream about movie stars, they must dream about me for I am real and they are not. - Alexander Popov
User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3502 posts, RR: 17
Reply 26, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 985 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting tu204 (Reply 25):

Interesting video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDTjR...g-all&context=G24f4fedFAAAAAAAAIAA

Interesting indeed. But it seems they forgot to mention that in Syria it is the president army killing his own people.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlineraffik From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2006, 1716 posts, RR: 4
Reply 27, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 942 times:

It is a humanitarian crime that nothing has been done to attempt to help those suffering in Syria.
Assad is literally getting away with murder in that country (and outside).

I think that it is a much more complex problem than what happened in Libya.
Any possible attempt at "invasion" could be met with retaliatory force from Hezbollah, who I believe
are a very well armed supporter of the Syrian regime. Not to mention Iran..

I agree with Cedarjet regarding the Syrian oppression of its people. I visited Homs a few years ago
and secret police are everywhere. My father got detained by them in 2006 after a "waiter" overheard
my father telling a friend (in Homs) that he believed that it was the Syrians who assassinated Lebanese
PM Hariri. He was followed to his hotel and then detained for several hours.

Thankfully we got them out of Lebanon but I envisage any sort of action, whether it be by the Arabs or
UN to be met with resistance by Iran & Hezbollah



Happy -go- lucky kinda guy!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Do The Owners Of Liverpool Want To Do? posted Thu Oct 14 2010 08:50:18 by fca767
Do You Want To Own A Bit Of G-BDXH? posted Mon Oct 4 2010 03:32:40 by lhr380
Anyone Want To Joing A "gentleman's" FF League? posted Mon Sep 6 2010 06:25:23 by swa4life
Anyone Want To Read My Travelblog? posted Sat Aug 28 2010 10:29:07 by Yellowstone
Want To Get A Bike... Suggestions? posted Mon Aug 16 2010 19:03:25 by waterpolodan
Would You Want To Live Older Than Usual? posted Wed Aug 4 2010 19:30:01 by TZ757300
I'm An American, But Want To Be Russian ;) posted Fri Jun 25 2010 18:15:06 by PC12Fan
Languages You Speak And Want To? posted Thu Jun 10 2010 09:54:03 by tk747
Senator Want To Boycott 2011 MLB All Star Game posted Mon May 10 2010 14:08:55 by dragon-wings
Want To Buy Queen Elizabeth II's Personal Jaguar? posted Fri Mar 19 2010 02:17:08 by MadameConcorde