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Should The Bahrain F1 Grand Prix Be Cancelled?  
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1750 times:

There is the sports side but the flip side needs to be be taken into account considering all the recent events in Bahrain with the government violent clamp down on the opposition.

Formula One drivers have started practice runs in Bahrain amid increasing calls to cancel the Grand Prix race because of anti-government protests.

Cars took to the track this morning as activists promised to mark this weekend's event with "days of rage". A number of protesters were arrested over night as Arab Spring demonstrations flared across the Gulf Kingdom.

Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper said British F1 stars Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton should not take part in the three-day event. However, a spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron said it was not for the government to intervene in the matter. But the spokesman added that Britain remained "deeply concerned" about the human rights situation in Bahrain.

Bahrain F1 Grand Prix kicks off amid threat of violence

Bahrain braces for waves of protests during the first practice session of the Formula One Grand Prix Friday, with the looming threat of violence in the wake of a year-long clampdown on a pro-democracy movement.
http://www.france24.com/en/20120420-...n-formula-one-protests-arab-spring


Protests rage as Bahrain Grand Prix practice begins

(Reuters) - Formula One cars took to the track in Bahrain on Friday, with the government hoping for a successful Grand Prix, while activists are promising to mark it with "days of rage" after more than a year of Arab Spring protests.

On the eve of Friday's practice session, which began at about 3 a.m. EDT, protests had flared in villages surrounding the capital, far from the circuit where the race will be held. Police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators in clashes that have been building in the week leading to Sunday's round of the World Championship.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...in-grandprix-idUSBRE83J07R20120420


Aljazeera Bahrain blog
http://blogs.aljazeera.net/liveblog/Bahrain

All drivers except Force India are running in Practice 2 on the racing track at this moment. Force India drivers said they would not go on the racing track today after two of their team members got harrassed by protesters on their way to the hotel.

Should this world scale sports event be maintained in regard of the situation in Bahrain?

Please discuss.

    Wow!  

[Edited 2012-04-20 04:35:58]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1742 times:

No, it shouldn't be cancelled, and Labour goons should keep their noses out.

User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5743 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1740 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
Should this world scale sports event be maintained in regard of the situation in Bahrain?

The real question is: How many people would notice if they actually did cancel it?   

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):


There is the sports side but the flip side needs to be be taken into account considering all the recent events in Bahrain with the government violent clamp down on the opposition.

I bet no one at FIA would dare to even think about cancelling the Chinese Communist GP so why pretend any interest in human rights now?


User currently onlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5744 posts, RR: 44
Reply 3, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1731 times:
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Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
Should this world scale sports event be maintained in regard of the situation in Bahrain?

Complex question,

There are countries that have a long standing culture of motor sport and there are those that get involved in F1 merely to showcase their country or to demonstrate how rich and powerful they are.
Bahrain is firmly in the latter group, they want to show the world they are the ones in control, F1 is happy to take their money and perpetuate the myth.

There have been few decisions taken by F1 (FOM & FIA) in recent years that have disapointed me more than this.

If there was a palace revolution in England or a coup in Belgium I would not have an issue racing there as the race was never intended as a propaganda statement for the ruling despot... Bahrain that was always the case(Several others as well)



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 4, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1721 times:

Quoting L410Turbolet (Reply 2):
I bet no one at FIA would dare to even think about cancelling the Chinese Communist GP

and the Mega-Millions Abu Dhabi GP?

Work Abuse Continues In Abu Dhabi, Human Rights Watch Reports

Earlier this year, we wrote about the 31-year-old construction worker who died on site at the still-in-progress NYU Abu Dhabi campus, crushed by an improperly installed pillar.
......
although developers have taken measures to enhance working conditions on site, dangerous and unethical treatment of laborers still continues. They have complained about unfair recruitment fees required to obtain jobs, misleading or absence of information about their jobs, inferior contracts, illegal salary deductions, and overcrowding in housing. And few migrant workers manage to hold on to their passports once they enter the country.


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 5, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

Bahrain's 'days of rage' - live updates
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012...0/syria-crisis-bahrain-unrest-live

A forum bug has prevented me from posting the link on the Abu Dhabi article.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5743 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1702 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 4):
and the Mega-Millions Abu Dhabi GP?

Let's not forget that the first Hungarian GP took place in 1986, although arguably events like that (or Queen's concert at Nepstadion the same year) contributed to the erosion of the regime(s) behind the Iron Curtain, not the least because by mid-1989 Hungarian goulash socialism was on the verge of bankruptcy.
What the motives of the FIA were back then... whether some noble cause or just $$$, I dare not to speculate

The biggest difference between F1 in 1986 and 2012 is that back then the races were actually fun to watch...

[Edited 2012-04-20 05:15:37]

User currently offlineCXB77L From Australia, joined Feb 2009, 2694 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1694 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

The short answer is 'no', boring Bahraini track notwithstanding.

This isn't the first time F1 races was run in politically sensitive areas. F1 was run in South Africa during the Apartheid era. There are now Grands Prix held in China, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. Sport should always separate itself from politics. Whether or not major political issues continue in that country is irrelevant to the question of whether the race should be run there, in my opinion. It's only when the safety of the sport's participants are threatened that they should consider pulling out.



Boeing 777 fanboy
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 8, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1685 times:

"Anonymous" threatens to hack Bahrain GP broadcasting

This is their press release:

Dear Free-Thinking Citizens of THE WORLD,
The Bahrainian government has shown by its actions that it intends to brutally enforce its reign of injustice by limiting free speech and access to truthful information to its citizens and the rest of the world. It is time to call for an end to this oppressive regime. The most basic human right is the transparency of one's government, and Bahrain's is no exception.

http://thehackernews.com/2011/02/ope...n-bahrain-opbahrain-anonymous.html

 Wow!



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1663 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 8):
Dear Free-Thinking Citizens of THE WORLD,

Nice, they threaten to censor us, the "free-thinking citizens of the world" because they dislike the regime censoring their citizens...

Anyone else see the irony in that? We aren't allowed to make up our own minds about this, Anonymous has to force a decision on us?


User currently offlineBill142 From Australia, joined Aug 2004, 8466 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1663 times:

Quoting L410Turbolet (Reply 6):
What the motives of the FIA were back then... whether some noble cause or just $$$, I dare not to speculate

Back then it was Bernie Ecclestone getting a good deal. The FIA have little say in reality.


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1658 times:

Someone made a good point a moment ago - Bahrain, Force India get caught up in some violence and its all over the front page of the news.

Brazil last year, Jenson Button gets attacked by armed men who attempt to carjack him and nothing is said about the safety of that race...


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14139 posts, RR: 63
Reply 12, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1651 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 9):
Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 8):
Dear Free-Thinking Citizens of THE WORLD,

Nice, they threaten to censor us, the "free-thinking citizens of the world" because they dislike the regime censoring their citizens...

Nope, it is less about censorship, but about stopping Ecclestone´s main source of income.

Jan


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 13, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1593 times:

Ecclestone and crown prince insist race will go on

Bernie Ecclestone and Bahrain’s crown prince have refused to consider cancelling this weekend’s race amid rising concern about the situation in the country.
...
“I can’t call this race off. Nothing to do with us. We’ve an agreement to be here, and we’re here.

http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2012/04/2...clestone-crown-prince-insist-race/

  

Has the formula1.com website been hacked by Anonymous?

http://formula1.com/

Anonymous hacking F1.com website confirmed.

Bahrain Formula 1: Anonymous Attacks Official F1 Website

The Anonymous hacking collective has attacked and taken offline Formula One website in support of the Bahraini protests against the decision to stage the Grand Prix despite continued government crackdown on activists, professionals and opposition members.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/33...ial-formula-1-websites-protest.htm

 alert 

[Edited 2012-04-20 09:11:12]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15833 posts, RR: 27
Reply 14, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1586 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
There is the sports side but the flip side needs to be be taken into account considering all the recent events in Bahrain with the government violent clamp down on the opposition.

Not really. I just want my racing.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
However, a spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron said it was not for the government to intervene in the matter.

Good for him.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
Force India drivers said they would not go on the racing track today after two of their team members got harrassed by protesters on their way to the hotel.

Protesters can be so annoying.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 15, posted (2 years 8 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1546 times:

Bahrain: Ferrari driver John Valdes participating in Al-Wefaq march 20/04/2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3fMUsQOlh0&sns=tw

al wefaq is the opposition to the monarchy movement

I wonder what will be Bernie's reaction on this one

 



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1466 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1478 times:

The protestors in Bahrain are peaceful, in the same way the looters in London last year were just "peaceful shoppers".

You do know, Madame Concorde, that one absolute demand from the protestor to the government for starting talks, was to have their car loan debts either wiped off or paid by the government. That doesn't sound like a call for democracy if you ask me, more like a bunch of opportunists exploiting the situation.

Perhaps you should educate yourself a bit before voicing an ill-founded opinion. Just saying.



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlinesudden From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1475 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 16):
Perhaps you should educate yourself a bit before voicing an ill-founded opinion

  
And there goes another person who actually manage to see that what MadameConcorde is stating is pure and simply nothing but second guessing.
Reading up on facts before stating anything has never been her strong side.



When in doubt, flat out!
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1459 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 16):
You do know, Madame Concorde, that one absolute demand from the protestor to the government for starting talks, was to have their car loan debts either wiped off or paid by the government. That doesn't sound like a call for democracy if you ask me, more like a bunch of opportunists exploiting the situation.

Have you got a link to that?


User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1466 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1453 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 18):
Have you got a link to that?

Nope, and I honestly can't be arsed looking for it. But if you check GDN online you might find it there.



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently onlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5744 posts, RR: 44
Reply 20, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1452 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting CXB77L (Reply 7):
F1 was run in South Africa during the Apartheid era.

When the same governments that are curently wringing their hands and saying they should not be mixing sports and politcs were enforcing draconion bans on sporting contact with South Africa.

Quoting L410Turbolet (Reply 6):
Let's not forget that the first Hungarian GP took place in 1986,

Running a GP in Hungary was part of the process of opening up the cvountry.

In the above events F1 was not used by the regimes or the opposition in the way we are seeing in Bahrain, both sides using F1 branding and logos to further their aims... That is an unacceptable mixing of sports and politics.

By the opposition..





By the ruling regime




If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlinezkojq From New Zealand, joined Sep 2011, 1357 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1423 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
Should this world scale sports event be maintained in regard of the situation in Bahrain?

The reality is that a decent part of the Formula One Group's business model is to make as much money as they can from wealthy governments who essentially want the event to show off. Examples being China, Bahrain, Korea, India, Singapore and Abu Dhabi. As the Formula One Group will be contractually obligated to run the race I would think that they would do all they could to ensure that the race goes ahead - if they don't run the race they probably won't get paid.

Bahrain clearly has widespread social problems many of them related to the government's repression of Shia. Last year several doctors got sentenced to 15 years jail for helping injured protesters which i find outrageous. Unfortunately cancelling the Grand Prix won't solve these problems even if it sends 'the right message' to the government.
http://nyti.ms/I1307t

Overall though, F1 fans just want to see racing and don't want it cancelled due to the host nation's internal problems - maybe it is best to have the event somewhere less volatile next year (I'm sure the Qatar government would be happy to host).

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 16):
You do know, Madame Concorde, that one absolute demand from the protestor to the government for starting talks, was to have their car loan debts either wiped off or paid by the government. That doesn't sound like a call for democracy if you ask me, more like a bunch of opportunists exploiting the situation.

It only takes a few people making extremist/unrealistic demands to illegitimate a whole protest...



First to fly on the Boeing 787-9 with Air New Zealand and ZK-NZE; NZ103, AKL-SYD, 2014/08/09. I was 83rd to board.
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13200 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1356 times:

I brought this issue up in thread here as to last weeks China F1 race and as an earlier poster in this thread noted (opposing the cancellation of the Bahrain race):

Quoting CXB77L (Reply 7):
This isn't the first time F1 races was run in politically sensitive areas. F1 was run in South Africa during the Apartheid era. There are now Grands Prix held in China, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. Sport should always separate itself from politics. Whether or not major political issues continue in that country is irrelevant to the question of whether the race should be run there, in my opinion. It's only when the safety of the sport's participants are threatened that they should consider pulling out.

You also had F-1 or it's = races in Nazi era Germany, in one-party states (Mexico until recent years), under Francisco Franco in Spain, maybe during the Mussolini era in Italy, Brazil during military governance, and so on. Yet they pull the race from the USA due to a tire problem. You will never get rid of the incestuous nexus of sport and politics and I do believe that should not be ignored if the human rights issues are serious enough.

As I noted in my post as to the China race, racing there and in Bahrain is important to the sponsors seeking consumers in a place with little regulation as to advertising, a growing consumer class, unlike much of the Western world. Mercedes does a nice business in cars and trucks in the Middle East so it is no wonder they probably support racing in Bahrain. Of course the USA has blood on it's hands as to Bahrain as a major port location for US Navy and other military operations with a base there on the approval of the rulers there, mainly to keep an eye on Iran and to make sure the oil shipping ways are protected for us and the rest of the world.

One also has to wonder about the greed and money Bernie and his buddies that they are corrupted by from such questionable leaders and won't give up except upon death of themselves or of people involved with teams. Anti-government protesters, meh.

Perhaps any sponsor of a car in the race with any American connections, like Ferrari (with it's connections to Fiat and Chrysler,) HP, and others, as well as major Euro companies should pull them for this race to make a clear point of opposition to the political situation there. The race would still run but not be seen as being condoned by those companies and the citizens and governments of their home bases. I do hope the race is run clean, there are no protests before, during or after the race to mar it, but I also hope the various commentators and networks covering this race make a clear point of the political issues there.

[Edited 2012-04-21 14:42:09]

User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1466 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (2 years 8 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1345 times:

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 22):
I do hope the race is run clean, there are no protests before, during or after the race to mar it, but I also hope the various commentators and networks covering this race make a clear point of the political issues there.

An estimated 20K protestors hit the streets Friday night, another estimated 10K this evening. Tear gas is flowing through certain parts of Manama as I type this from the comfort of my hotel room on Amwaj Island, in response to the "peaceful protestors" throwing firebombs and looting stores.

A guy was found dead, apparently beaten to death. While nobody knows who snuffed him, the protestors took to the streets and did their usual stuff. But when I drove through Juffair earlier this evening I saw a gang of Bahraini's beating up another Bahraini pretty badly - it's hardly as if their capacity for violence is non-existent. Was the man found dead killed by security forces? Perhaps, perhaps not - we don't know. But if you listen to the thinly veiled allegations of the media, he was tortured to death by security forces.

The "various" commentators are not refraining from commenting on the politics, and it's the usual one-sided view they're broadcasting. Like the utterly inaccurate fact the Sunni minority represents 30% of the population, when in actual fact it's closer to 45. On the other hand, the fact the protestors are being sponsored and encouraged by Iran is largely ignored by the same media types.

It can all be summed up in a few words: Do not trust anything you hear on Western media. You know who utterly inaccurate they are when it comes to reporting on anything aviation related, and in my experience they are just as inaccurate on everything else. If you don't trust the media to report accurately on aviation, why would you trust them on anything else?



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlineCXB77L From Australia, joined Feb 2009, 2694 posts, RR: 5
Reply 24, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1279 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 22):
but I also hope the various commentators and networks covering this race make a clear point of the political issues there.

Sorry, but I strongly disagree with that. The commentators are paid to talk about the racing, not the political situation, nor should they consider themselves to be qualified to make such comments without knowing the full story. I sincerely hope that they focus solely on the racing.



Boeing 777 fanboy
User currently offlinefrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3845 posts, RR: 11
Reply 25, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1278 times:

If anything else, the F1 race has stirred attention and debate around the issue again.

As with every civilian turmoil situation in any country, the situation is largely more complex than how our media tend to depict it, which is usually a simplistic portray of a good vs. evil / David vs. Goliath kind of struggle we like to emotionally associate with...

It's F1's role to do nothing about, remain absolutely neutral that and stick to contracts, even if I have a feeling Bernie and his cronies could care less about the underlying violence and suffering.

I just wish the drivers would show a bit of restraint during the podium ceremony or something like that.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 26, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1268 times:

Red Bull's world champion Sebastian Vettel, who starts at pole position, said shortly after arrival on Thursday that he thought much of what was being reported was hype.

He looked forward to getting in the car and dealing with the "stuff that really matters - tyre temperatures, cars".

http://news.yahoo.com/f1-teams-race-...ahrain-streets-061015613--spt.html

  



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13200 posts, RR: 15
Reply 27, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1249 times:

The USA coverage on Speed channel spent the first 2 or so minutes, by only Bob Varsha a very experienced car race commentator in the USA, noting the political and human rights situation in Bahrain as well as noting last years cancellation of the race and this the delay this year due to the situation there. They didn't get into the details as it has complex background reasons, but at least they didn't ignore it. They acknowledged that people have been killed there in those protests and the battle by the government to repress them, using news video. They didn't comment much further after that, sticking to the race.

By the way, but for a few races, our F1 Speed channel/Fox network (Speed is owned by Fox/News International and part of Rupert Murdoch's media empire) commentators are in the USA (North Carolina I believe) but for one on-track representative and use the international feed of the race adding advertising and their vocals. Apparently the stands are said to be nearly 'sold out' but it looks quite sparse away from the main start/finish line ones, perhaps due to the situation there.


User currently offlinefrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3845 posts, RR: 11
Reply 28, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1238 times:

Lotus is doing really good.
And Raikkonnen seems to have lost little edge!
He's certainly making a much better comeback than Schumi, though I suppose the car helps.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1466 posts, RR: 3
Reply 29, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1211 times:

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 27):
Apparently the stands are said to be nearly 'sold out' but it looks quite sparse away from the main start/finish line ones, perhaps due to the situation there.

Main grandstand was the only one to sell out. Batelco less than half full, University around 1/4. But that's actually not that unusual for Bahrain; they've never had a capacity crowd and are unlikely ever to.



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 30, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1205 times:

There is a lot of Champagne being popped in the Lotus garage with team members cheering and drinking. Crown Prince Salman was always supportive of F1. He looked happy going around the garages after the race. $500M is probably a drop in the water to this mega-rich Gulf Kingdom but it sems that they won't refuse it.

This is real French Champagne, not the fruit juice substitute we saw on the podium. A sign that the Monarchy is not so strictly religious and rather open minded.

Though it's rather sad to see this turmoil and beating up of protesters and worse even, I doubt there would be F1 if the Shi-ite pro-Iranian al wefaq opposition would get to taking power. There would probably be no such Western style televised sports events allowed at all -even less alcoholic beverages going around the garages..

[Edited 2012-04-22 07:23:32]


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 31, posted (2 years 8 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1200 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 29):
Main grandstand was the only one to sell out. Batelco less than half full, University around 1/4. But that's actually not that unusual for Bahrain; they've never had a capacity crowd and are unlikely ever to.

Also Sunday is normal work day in Bahrain.. All Christian churches have their services on Friday, not Sunday.
Those who want to go to F1 probably have to ask for taking a day off.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
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