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How To Watch US TV Shows From Overseas?  
User currently offlinecomorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4896 posts, RR: 16
Posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 19375 times:

I have been out of the US for a few months and miss some of my shows that are not shown here in India, especially channels like HBO and AMC. Does anyone know how I can plug back in? I do have a high-speed internet connection...

Thanks in advance.

22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 19375 times:

The biggest hurdle would be the US-sites picking up an Indian ISP address and blocking it. In most cases, they're not allowed to broadcast outside of the US...not even Canada. So, when you try to log on to, say, Hulu, it will say "We cannot stream outside of the US", and you're stopped right there. Happens to me all the time.

User currently offlinefritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 19343 times:

I don't know if american channels have streams over the web, but if they do you should try getting a VPN located in america. That way when you log on to the VPN and access american streams, the server will see that your IP adress originates out of the US. That is how I have accessed European streams while being abroad.

//Fritzi


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8795 posts, RR: 24
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 19342 times:

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
The biggest hurdle would be the US-sites picking up an Indian ISP address and blocking it.

It would be a big job for a US content server such as Netflix to identify all IP and interrogate their locations. More likely, they are tracking the DNS server you are using (there are a lot fewer of them). If the DNS server is in India or other foreign country, they block the request.

A possible way around that is to use one of the public DNS servers in the US. Google's is 8.8.8.8, and alternate is 8.8.4.4. You can find some more here: http://theos.in/windows-xp/free-fast-public-dns-server-list/

The DNS server is the router your request goes to. When you type in "www.airliners.net", that goes to your nearest DNS server that your ISP uses (in your case probably in India), and it forwards your request along but with the proper IP address.

By changing your DNS setting from automatic (which is probably your current setting) to Google's public DNS, you might be able to spoof the server into thinking the request comes from the US. Give it a try.

The downside to this is that every time you click on a link or type in a URL, it has to be sent to the US instead of the DNS on the other side of town, so your clicks might be a bit slower to respond.

Give it a try and tell us how it worked.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinecomorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4896 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 19334 times:

Thanks everyone for your helpful comments!

Dreadnought, I will try your tip tomorrow and report back. Otherwise the VPN idea seems to be the next best candidate.


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 19320 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
It would be a big job for a US content server such as Netflix to identify all IP and interrogate their locations. More likely, they are tracking the DNS server you are using (there are a lot fewer of them). If the DNS server is in India or other foreign country, they block the request.

Yeah that's probably what I meant. Sorry, I am terrible with IT-related stuff.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6539 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 19273 times:

Well, the simplest route is the illegal route, of course. Personally I got a Giganews Diamond account (in a way, I'm giving the US some money). Every show is there, in HD if it exists (old shows aren't in HD, of course). The account also includes a VPN if it is needed, useful for me to avoid my country's spies.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offline817Dreamliiner From Montserrat, joined Jul 2008, 2220 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 19267 times:

I would suggest getting a slingbox and hooking it up to your (or someone else you know) cable in the US, and then download the slingplayer on your computer. However there are drawbacks to it, so it may not be the best suggestion.


Reality be Rent. Synapse, break! Vanishment, This World!
User currently offlinedanielmyatt From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2011, 160 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 19241 times:

Sorry to hijack the thread but it's a related question.
In the UK we have something called TV catchup, where you can watch live TV online and through the iPad/iPhone app. It's all completely legit, and all the channels shown are freeview, as in free to air channels (BBC, ITV, etc).

Is there a similar thing I can use in the US? As I'm moving there in June and I won't have guaranteed regular access to a TV, due to the nature of my work and my accomodation, but I like to watch the TV when I am trying to nod off to sleep.


User currently onlineeaa3 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1000 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 19233 times:

It rhymes with porrent and rorrent and lorrent.

There is an interesting place in the internet where pirates assemble in a bay  


User currently offlinespeedbird217 From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2012, 334 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 19215 times:

To access US-only content outside the US: Search Google for a program called "Hotspot Shield". It tells the internet (sorry for this basic explanation) that you have an American IP-address and you can watch shows on the network's websites, access Netflix, Pandora and so on...I use it all the time and can't notice any difference in bandwidth.

Since I got back to Germany after living in the US for a while, I always use it. It's a great program and you don't have to live without all that stuff. AFAIK it's even legal.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21418 posts, RR: 54
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 19176 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
By changing your DNS setting from automatic (which is probably your current setting) to Google's public DNS, you might be able to spoof the server into thinking the request comes from the US. Give it a try.

No, that doesn't work.

Your computer asks the DNS server just for the binary/numeric IP address of the server for a given domain name such as airliners.net and returns the "naked" IP address such as 69.64.153.151.

Your computer will then access the server at that IP address directly. The actual data request does not go through the DNS server, so it makes absolutely no difference whatsoever which DNS server you're using as long as it delivers the correct IP address. "Geo-blocking" servers do indeed check the IP address of the requesting computer itself against the geographical allocation of that IP address.

So the way to get around that is to use a proxy in the US, which means all your traffic will actually have to flow through that proxy server, making it appear that your request is coming from within the USA. That proxy may impose various limits and of course you can have no expectation of privacy, since the proxy will see all your requests and every response.


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8795 posts, RR: 24
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 19134 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):
No, that doesn't work.

Damn, I thought I'd figured out something cool...



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2643 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 19109 times:

Quoting danielmyatt (Reply 8):
Is there a similar thing I can use in the US?

For a British person? Yep... PBS.  

  



Pancakes are delicious.
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7233 posts, RR: 17
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 19108 times:

For sporting events, when I was in Japan, I never had a problem picking up the Fox Sports baseball feeds. You just gotta find the right website.


One of the FB admins for PHX Spotters. "Zach the Expat!"
User currently offlinecmf From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 19100 times:

Quoting comorin (Thread starter):
Does anyone know how I can plug back in

Have a look at slingbox. It is a different approach that depending on your situation may be the right solution, or not.

It is a small box that you plug in with your cable box. Your computer communicates with the box to become the TV screen. For all practical purposes this is like sitting in in front of a TV in US. I have used it for years and it works really great. Mine is hooked up with my Media Center so I have access to everything it has recorded.

The negatives is that you need to have a place to install it and they need to have descent upload speed. But if you do then it works great.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
It would be a big job for a US content server such as Netflix to identify all IP and interrogate their locations. More likely, they are tracking the DNS server you are using (there are a lot fewer of them).

I have never seen anyone trying to identify by DNS server. I would need to install SW on your computer to know what DNS server you use and there is no way in hell I can expect people to allow me to do that.

But getting the IP address you connect from is easy, Matching that address to a geolocation is nothing but a db lookup. There are plenty of companies providing this information. Even completely free with very good data. All you do is update the the lists every week or so. The data is much more static than most people imagine so that is plenty enough.


User currently offline817Dreamliiner From Montserrat, joined Jul 2008, 2220 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 19092 times:

Quoting cmf (Reply 15):
Have a look at slingbox. It is a different approach that depending on your situation may be the right solution, or not.

It is a small box that you plug in with your cable box. Your computer communicates with the box to become the TV screen. For all practical purposes this is like sitting in in front of a TV in US. I have used it for years and it works really great. Mine is hooked up with my Media Center so I have access to everything it has recorded.

The negatives is that you need to have a place to install it and they need to have descent upload speed. But if you do then it works great.

I suggested this in my previous post, another negative is that only one can watch(via the player) at any given time, also you may end up in a channel war if someones already watching it via the tv! Has happened to me already. But on the bright side I get to watch local cable from Jamaica here in the UK! 



Reality be Rent. Synapse, break! Vanishment, This World!
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21418 posts, RR: 54
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 19052 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 12):
Damn, I thought I'd figured out something cool...

If it worked, it would be a neat trick, indeed!   


User currently offlineblrBird From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 578 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 19021 times:

Buy a US proxy cost's about $10-20/month and you are good to stream US based TV content, Netflix etc. Change your browser proxy to the one you bought.

Enjoy!



from star dust....
User currently offlinespeedbird217 From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2012, 334 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 19020 times:

Quoting blrBird (Reply 18):
Buy a US proxy cost's about $10-20/month

Why pay money for something you can get for free? I can only repeat myself and recommend you this program. It does exactly what you are asking for and costs nothing.You can download it here: http://hotspotshield.com/


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8795 posts, RR: 24
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 19007 times:

Quoting blrBird (Reply 18):
Buy a US proxy cost's about $10-20/month and you are good to stream US based TV content, Netflix etc. Change your browser proxy to the one you bought.

I've been looking around, and Netflix apparently can recognize a proxy for what it is. This site recommends a VPN.

http://vpncreative.com/netflix/how-to-watch-netflix-abroad/



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinecomorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4896 posts, RR: 16
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 19001 times:

Thanks guys for all the great suggestions! A.Net is full of good people like youse always willing to help.

I think my first stop is to try Speedbird217's recommendation with the Hot Spot Shield VPN.

Cmf, Dreamliiner: I can't use a slingbox since I don't have a US physical presence anymore...I guess you could call me an International Vagrant...

eaa3 - That's a good BIT of advice...  


Shows I want to watch right now are AMC's The Killing and the European original on BBC but I will have to find a source for that...


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2863 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (2 years 2 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 18971 times:

Quoting speedbird217 (Reply 10):
To access US-only content outside the US: Search Google for a program called "Hotspot Shield"

Fantastic! My Saturday evening is saved...tons of US shows to stream now.


Thanks a bunch man!   


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