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Cities Grow More Than Suburbs, 1st Time In 100 Yr  
User currently offlinekngkyle From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 411 posts, RR: 1
Posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2395 times:
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(US) Cities grow more than suburbs, first time in 100 years
'I will never live in the suburbs,' says young Denver resident who grew up in the suburb of Littleton, Colo., an attitude apparently shared by many of her peers

WASHINGTON — For the first time in a century, most of America's largest cities are growing at a faster rate than their surrounding suburbs as young adults seeking a foothold in the weak job market shun home-buying and stay put in bustling urban centers.

...

New Orleans, which saw its population shrivel in the mid-2000s due to Hurricane Katrina, saw the biggest rebound in city growth relative to suburbs in the last year, 3.7 percent vs. 0.6 percent. Atlanta, Denver, Washington, D.C., and Charlotte, N.C., also showed wide disparities in city growth compared to suburbs.

Other big cities showing faster growth compared to the previous decade include Boston, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Minneapolis and Seattle.

...

"The recession hit suburban markets hard. What we're seeing now is young adults moving out from their parents' homes and starting to find jobs," Shepard said. "There's a bigger focus on building residences near transportation hubs, such as a train or subway station, because fewer people want to travel by car for an hour and a half for work anymore."

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In recent years, the share of 16- to 39-year-olds with driver's licenses has declined markedly. The suburb also is no longer a refuge from poverty, now surpassing cities in numbers of poor people.

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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47992439/ns/us_news-life/#.T-xtVJLE1eg

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinekngkyle From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 411 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2395 times:
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Guess I'm not the only one who feels this way.

User currently offlineCharles79 From Puerto Rico, joined Mar 2007, 1331 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2380 times:

Quoting kngkyle (Reply 1):
Guess I'm not the only one who feels this way.

Count me in as well. I moved to DC in 2008 from Los Angeles (the mother of all urban expansions!) and don't regret it - I haven't driven since January this year, walk/take train/take bus everywhere, and reap the benefits of a healthier lifestyle.

On a curious note, the article highlights young adults. Even though I'm within that demographic (early 30s), my neighbours are all in their 40s and 50s (we all bought our homes between 2009 and 2010 and all moved to the city from the suburbs). Granted, the city is more expensive so we all have modest houses instead of McMansions but the benefits far outweigh the smaller space. As long as I can afford it I will stay in the city.


User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8229 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2352 times:

The suburbs have their benefits, but only older suburbs with character, where you can walk down your leafy lane to the "downtown" strip with mom and pop stores and a greasy spoon or even a bar. The San Francisco peninsula, north Chicago, west Boston, DC etc. all exemplify this well. The sunbelt suburbs of endless cul-de-sac patterns and copycat architecture are just too bland to be enjoyable - not to mention having to drive 10-15 minutes just to use an ATM. Screw that. The benefits of inner city living are many but often come at oppressive cost as well as noise.

Japan has truly been the best of both worlds for me. On what passes for the "suburban" fringe of Nagoya, I've got a hilly neighborhood with trees, leading down to a train station on a line that goes everywhere I need, with a huge shopping complex and 24 hour supermarket attached to the station. Everything - and I mean everything - dry cleaners, hardware, ATM, bars, restaurants, medical clinics, and a park with dog runs and a lake - is within easy walking distance. The trade-off for higher population density is well worth it. And on backstreets a block behind my place, there are 100+ year old traditional homes which survived the war that fill the street with the sweet smell of cedar. All that convenience for $600 rent. Can't complain at all.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7972 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2296 times:

Yuck, I'd take suburbs over the city any day. Though I think I'd prefer to live the city rather than the extreme country, depends how far from stores it is...


Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21804 posts, RR: 55
Reply 5, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2234 times:

Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 3):
The sunbelt suburbs of endless cul-de-sac patterns and copycat architecture are just too bland to be enjoyable - not to mention having to drive 10-15 minutes just to use an ATM. Screw that.

   God forbid I ever live in one of those places. I don't want to have to get in a car just to go grocery shopping.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlinemax999 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1077 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 5 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2223 times:

Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 3):
The suburbs have their benefits, but only older suburbs with character, where you can walk down your leafy lane to the "downtown" strip with mom and pop stores and a greasy spoon or even a bar. The San Francisco peninsula, north Chicago, west Boston, DC etc. all exemplify this well. The sunbelt suburbs of endless cul-de-sac patterns and copycat architecture are just too bland to be enjoyable - not to mention having to drive 10-15 minutes just to use an ATM. Screw that. The benefits of inner city living are many but often come at oppressive cost as well as noise.

You make a very good point.

Also, those Sunbelt suburbs are built on the basis of cheap oil. With the expectation that oil prices are only going higher in our lifetimes, those suburbs where you have to drive to get anywhere look less and less attractive everyday.



All the things I really like to do are either immoral, illegal, or fattening.
User currently offlinetz757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2875 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2153 times:

I fully support this trend. I grew up in rural Delaware, which slowly transformed into suburban territory. I absolutely despise it. Having to deal with the increase of cars and people just to do basic tasks is almost unbearable. I finally am moving within city limits of Wilmington to escape this nonsense (which many feel is a suburb of Philadelphia, but I think they complement each other).

Maybe once my car is paid off, I can get rid of it  



LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineusflyer msp From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2162 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2138 times:

It is true. I grew up in the suburbs and have zero interest in ever living in the suburbs again. Homogeneity, sprawl, and HOA's are a huge turn off for me.

User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2112 times:

I work in planning, so I may be a bit biased responding to this.

Quoting kngkyle (Thread starter):
For the first time in a century, most America's largest cities are growing at a faster rate than their surrounding suburbs as young adults seeking a foothold in the weak job market shun home-buying and stay put in bustling urban centers.

I think there's a big difference between living in an urban core (like downtown Seattle) than living in some of the outlying neighborhoods where you can have a stand alone home rather than a condo.

The key thing here is "young adults". Of course, when I was in my 20s we lived near downtown, near bars, etc. But, now we live in a town home a few miles from the city center. I suspect a lot of people in the 30s demographic fit in this as well. You can have a small yard and not live in a condo. The schools are better as well. And, you can still walk to a store.

Quoting Charles79 (Reply 2):
On a curious note, the article highlights young adults. Even though I'm within that demographic (early 30s), my neighbours are all in their 40s and 50s (we all bought our homes between 2009 and 2010 and all moved to the city from the suburbs). Granted, the city is more expensive so we all have modest houses instead of McMansions but the benefits far outweigh the smaller space. As long as I can afford it I will stay in the city.

This may have more to do with the changing demographics. People over 50 mainly like to live in the suburbs, real suburbs where there's a Wal-Mart or Home Depot nearby. But (I haven't researched this), there may be more young professionals that are single or married without children perfectly content to live downtown and not have a yard, pay for a parking spot, and live in a much smaller place. Our first apartment in Seattle was a little under 700 sq. feet.

Quoting Mir (Reply 5):
God forbid I ever live in one of those places. I don't want to have to get in a car just to go grocery shopping.

And I can respect that. Not knowing much about your personal situation, thats fine with a fair number of people. I think that changes the more kids you have. We have one and are happy living just outside the downtown area, if we have one or two more (depending on where we work) I think we'd rather move away from downtown for better schools and a larger home. As it stands, we pay almost $2K a month for a 1500 sq. foot town home near downtown Seattle. If we moved to the 'burbs we'd get another 1K square feet, a yard and less traffic for the same amount.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offline2707200X From United States of America, joined Mar 2009, 8716 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2101 times:

I think their are great advantages to living in the city, this includes more job opportunities, shorter commutes, better public transit, closer access to airports, closer to hospitals, great singles life, cultural connections, entertainment, shopping, museums, tolerance of lifestyles, higher education and diversity of religion or not to believe. This is not exclusive to cities or absent from small town or bedroom communities. Their also disadvantages too including smaller, possibly more expensive dwellings, troubled public schools, street congestion, expensive gas, pollution, stress and other things. Source Advantages & Disadvantages

Some of the disadvantages of commuter town life includes long commutes, very dependent on (large) cars, limited public transportation if any, more likely to be pulled over by local law enforcement and issued a citation, limited local job opportunity, police or sheriff's deputy, teacher, if hiring, or for beginners, the local shopping center, limited entertainment venues and nosey neighbors/less tolerant of alternative lifestyles. Advantages includes less expensive land for larger housing for families, more open space for parks, better public schools, cheaper gas, less crime, more clean and better for large scale grocery and other large goods shopping. Source Yahoo Voices

I would choose to live in the city because of job availability, close access to airports, entertainment venues, museums, things to do and cultural diversity.

[Edited 2012-06-28 20:48:41]


"And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by." John Masefield Sea-Fever
User currently offlinevinniewinnie From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 798 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2078 times:

America is fascinating in this respect. the "White flight" really impoverished urban areas from the 60 until a few years ago. Now people are starting to understand that congestion, high fuel prices and gigantic houses aren't ideal.

When I came to the US I lived in a very lively neighborhood of DC cause I commute to work in the suburbs by public transport. When I found a new job in Frederick, MD, i tried to live in Suburbia (North Bethesda, Rockville) but hated it. Really was over reliant on my car,didn't see anyone and to be honest there was not much to do.

Now I live in Bethesda and though still suburban provides a bit of life as well as a bit more of community feel. Still not amazing though give me downtown DC any day!


User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 4040 posts, RR: 28
Reply 12, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2066 times:

Well, I personally, while unfortunate enough to have to live n NYC, can't wait for a chance to move to Long Island or Westchester (or heck, even Jersey). For starters, real estate taxes on a tiny apartment you "own" in the city cost more than the rent on a place twice the size in most of the country, let alone mortgage costs.

I wonder what the impact of the housing crisis was on this. Don't forget that home ownership is down markedly over the past few years - while that is not necessarily a bad thing, there tends to be a lot more offerings of rental properties in cities than in suburbs.



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineFlyboyOz From Australia, joined Nov 2000, 1987 posts, RR: 25
Reply 13, posted (2 years 5 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2020 times:

Hong Kong used to have lots of suburbs (it had huge parks and it was quiet) but now it becomes the city.


The Spirit of AustraliAN - Longreach
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