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The PC Is Not Dead  
User currently offlinebmacleod From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 2273 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3757 times:

While I like the new I-Pad there are uses for the PC such as 3D gaming that the I-Pad may never be able to handle. I love my Flight Simulator!!!! Plus there is a huge market who still need PCs to run their business...

To just say the PC is dead is way premature especially from an insitution like MIT....

http://www.technologyreview.com/printer_friendly_article.aspx?id=39163

Really one should research the market before making such statements.....

[Edited 2012-07-26 07:41:18]


The engine is the heart of an airplane, but the pilot is its soul.
40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21460 posts, RR: 53
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3728 times:

"Dead" would be overstating it. Such headlines are little more than baiting for ad-supported page views.

But the desktop computer is increasingly receding into a niche (or a bunch of niches, actually); Even the notebook computer is replaced in more and more functions by other mobile devices where a desktop/notebook OS offers too few benefits to overcome the disadvantages in portability, if a mobile OS isn't already more practical by itself for the intended use.

More and more people relegate their regular computers to just occasional use or being a support bases for their mobile devices.

This has become a pretty major trend in recent years since first the iPhone and then the iPad kicked it off in 2007 and 2010, respectively.

Desktop OSes still have their place and that will likely remain the case for a long time. That's just no longer where people's main focus is for the most part.

In the beginning every computer was what we now call a mainframe.

Then emerged the desktop computers.

Then the laptop or notebook computers.

And even later handheld computers in various formats.

There has always been the need for all of these form factors. It's just today that all of them are actually feasible and people have begun to adopt them according to their needs and preferences.

The desktop and notebook computer are just not ideal for every kind of use and never have been – they were just the only practical option there was for a long time. As new options emerge, people move away from the forced use of desktop and notebook computers in large numbers, some with only a part of their computing, some entirely.

But "the PC is dead" sounds so much more spectacular, doesn't it...?   


User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3687 times:

These articles always talk as though consumer use of computers is the only possible use, and completely ignore their use in business. Realistically it will be many decades before PCs are "dead" for businesses. In my company of 500 people there are perhaps 20 who could work without a desktop/laptop machine. This isn't just a screen size issue; it's other things- networking/hard drive/specialized software/cloud security etc.

Yes, if Grandma wants to browse the internet she can do it on an iPad just as well (except for the whole Flash thing of course), but the notion that everybody else is throwing away their laptops in favor of iPads is a bit fanciful to me. They are an addition to a laptop/desktop, not a replacement.

Once the tablet market opens up a bit and some other competitors can challenge Apple things might change a little, as developers will be freed up to offer applications without having to go through the App Store, but it could be a while before anybody does that, so for now the market is limited and will remain so for the time being.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21460 posts, RR: 53
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3676 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 2):
They are an addition to a laptop/desktop, not a replacement.

They can very well be that as well – it simply depends on the requirements. And that applies to business use as well as to private use. That is already becoming quite clear.

It just depends on what these requirements happen to be.


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8266 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3666 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 2):
(except for the whole Flash thing of course),

PCs aren't dead, but Flash is. No reason to dump an out of date technology on Grammy - she will do very will with the iPad and a handful of apps.


User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3661 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
They can very well be that as well – it simply depends on the requirements. And that applies to business use as well as to private use. That is already becoming quite clear.

Obviously I am generalizing, but for the most part there are few people (at least among people I know) who are replacing their personal laptops with iPads; they are just an addition to the family of devices they use. This may change in the future, but that is the most common current use scenario for tablets.

If I was a betting man in the future I'd expect they will become far more popular in the home (though it's not a given; it depends on whether a suitable competitor to Apple springs up) and fractionally more popular in very specific business scenarios.

To claim anything more is fanciful IMO.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2085 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3634 times:

I think the PC is still a great choice for home computing. I used to use a notebook for many years, but I did switch back to a desktop PC as my main working/entertainment/gaming device. Granted I use a smartphone when I'm out and about, but I don't think I'll ever add a notebook again to my equipment. If anything, I'd probably add a tablet to the mix.

Compared to a notebook, a PC:

- is generally cheaper (you get more performance for the same money)
- is ergonomically better (mouse, keyboard, large screen which sits in front of you rather than somewhere below you)
- lasts longer (less wear and tear)
- faulty components can easily be replaced, while for a notebook, it's often easier to just throw the whole thing away
- components can easily be upgraded
- more storage options for greater data security

Many people I know fool themselves about the mobility they need - they go "yeah but I want to use the notebook on the couch sometimes", but in reality the thing most always sits on the same table and is hardly ever moved.


Interestingly, the article is hardly about the PC at all. It's a pretty good article, rightfully critical about Apple's (other others') "walled garden" concept.



Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3628 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 4):
PCs aren't dead, but Flash is.

Tell that to the Internet.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12529 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3628 times:

Quoting bmacleod (Thread starter):
there are uses for the PC such as 3D gaming

When push comes to shove, that's a niche. It's a niche that I'm glad exists, but compared to everyone in the world who wants a computing device (server, desktop, mobile) it's a tiny number.

It does tend to push a lot of innovation into the industry so I'm glad it is there.

Quoting bmacleod (Thread starter):
Plus there is a huge market who still need PCs to run their business...

Yes, but that's moving away from today's model of powerful desktop PCs towards thin clients / bring your own device using cloud back-ends.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 1):
In the beginning every computer was what we now call a mainframe.

Exactly. We started with centralized computing, moved to distributed computing, and are now moving right back to centralized computing.

A key enabler has been ever-increasing network bandwidth.

It wasn't that long ago where you could not expect to have the bandwidth to remotely view a PC desktop.

Today, with better networks and better compression techniques, that's a solved problem.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 2):
These articles always talk as though consumer use of computers is the only possible use, and completely ignore their use in business. Realistically it will be many decades before PCs are "dead" for businesses. In my company of 500 people there are perhaps 20 who could work without a desktop/laptop machine. This isn't just a screen size issue; it's other things- networking/hard drive/specialized software/cloud security etc.

All that could easily move to the cloud, and the desktop could be used as nothing more than a bootloader for your favorite remote desktop and/or web browser software.

Once you do that, you find lots of things can be done pretty well with a tablet or a smartphone.

I'm sure there will be backlash from "power users" who want their own resources, but I think we'll see that a huge majority of folks are going to be OK with giving up some freedom in order to have someone else doing a lot of the management. A well managed cloud environment will make it easy to give more resources to those who need them.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3602 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 8):
All that could easily move to the cloud, and the desktop could be used as nothing more than a bootloader for your favorite remote desktop and/or web browser software.

"Easily" is not a word I would use. If you're talking about a couple of people writing word documents then you might be right, but most businesses of any reasonable size have

A) Very strict security requirements
B) Very specific proprietary software requirements
C) Very strict availability requirements
D) Very strict customer contractual requirements, especially regarding A)

None of these are addressed by cloud computing right now, and even when they are (which will be a while), business practices are slow to adapt.

I think it's a good model to work towards, but people trivialize the challenges in getting there way too much IMO as (like the article cited in the OP) they only think about consumer applications.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21460 posts, RR: 53
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3589 times:



Quoting zckls04 (Reply 5):
Obviously I am generalizing, but for the most part there are few people (at least among people I know) who are replacing their personal laptops with iPads; they are just an addition to the family of devices they use. This may change in the future, but that is the most common current use scenario for tablets.

I'm not remotely the only one who hasn't explicitly thrown out his notebook, but who uses it a lot less nowadays, to the point of possibly choosing to not replace it when the time comes.

The effect is the same.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 5):
If I was a betting man in the future I'd expect they will become far more popular in the home (though it's not a given; it depends on whether a suitable competitor to Apple springs up) and fractionally more popular in very specific business scenarios.

The way things are, Apple by themselves are doing just fine achieving that, particularly including business penetration.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 8):
Quoting bmacleod (Thread starter):
there are uses for the PC such as 3D gaming

When push comes to shove, that's a niche. It's a niche that I'm glad exists, but compared to everyone in the world who wants a computing device (server, desktop, mobile) it's a tiny number.

The desktop segment of it, yes. Desktop sales have been shrinking in relation to the total for years by now. But 3D games have long expanded beyond just desktop computers to notebooks and mobile devices. Sure, graphical complexity is somewhat reduced, but you don't have to go back all that far on the desktop to match what – for instance – iPad games already provide in 3D.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 8):
Quoting Klaus (Reply 1):
In the beginning every computer was what we now call a mainframe.

Exactly. We started with centralized computing, moved to distributed computing, and are now moving right back to centralized computing.

No, not really. Even smartphones have extensive local computing capabilities and do in fact use them, too. They just have access to internet resources in addition to that, same as desktops or notebooks.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 8):
All that could easily move to the cloud, and the desktop could be used as nothing more than a bootloader for your favorite remote desktop and/or web browser software.

Once you do that, you find lots of things can be done pretty well with a tablet or a smartphone.

Actual smartphones or tablets have never been limited to that. Your description doesn't match what's really happening.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 9):
None of these are addressed by cloud computing right now

RIM/Blackberry is a clear counter-example for exactly that.

It is primarily a matter of the techniques employed and the requirements defined. And those are evolving more rapidly right now than they have for a long time.

[Edited 2012-07-26 10:26:49]

User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3547 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 10):
I'm not remotely the only one who hasn't explicitly thrown out his notebook, but who uses it a lot less nowadays, to the point of possibly choosing to not replace it when the time comes.

The effect is the same.

"When the time comes" being the key phrase. The time hasn't come yet- if it had you'd sell your laptop while it's still worth some money.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 10):
The way things are, Apple by themselves are doing just fine achieving that, particularly including business penetration.

Apple are pursuing their own business model which is not (and never has been) about market share. Good for them- they have the premium market cornered both in the PC and tablet business. Doesn't change the fact that widespread adoption (particularly in the business world) is dependent on more reasonably priced and less firewalled alternatives.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 10):
RIM/Blackberry is a clear counter-example for exactly that.

I'm dying to hear your explanation for how a dying telco company solves all the problems with cloud computing. Should be good  .



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21460 posts, RR: 53
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3528 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 11):
"When the time comes" being the key phrase. The time hasn't come yet- if it had you'd sell your laptop while it's still worth some money.

No. Regarding the replacement of the notebook with the iPad it's already done. And that was the issue.

Whether the notebook is still gathering dust somewhere is not.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 11):
Apple are pursuing their own business model which is not (and never has been) about market share.

That is not entirely true – they don't prioritize market share, but of course they want it nevertheless.

And in the tablet segment they have just increased their market share from 60% to 68% despite new competition and despite them holding the top of the market almost exclusively.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 11):
Good for them- they have the premium market cornered both in the PC and tablet business.

And they are penetrating multiple markets downwards from there, with the previous-year iPhones (currently staggered two years back, apparently about to increase that to three years with the just started distribution of the 3GS in India), the previous-year iPad (plus, according to reports, a smaller model) and the MacBook Air effectively crushing the ultrabooks.

They are indeed pursuing market share, just not at the substantial expense of margins.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 11):
Doesn't change the fact that widespread adoption (particularly in the business world) is dependent on more reasonably priced and less firewalled alternatives.

It isn't. It depends mainly on the capability and software support of the available products. iPhone and iPad are already penetrating the corporate world in substantial numbers due to thorough security features, extensive professional app support, good policy and deployment support and in numbers by far exceeding much cheaper alternatives.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 11):
I'm dying to hear your explanation for how a dying telco company solves all the problems with cloud computing. Should be good

The argument was that "cloud computing" would never be accepted in the corporate world. And RIM has already proven that claim wrong.

That they are circling the drain by now is unfortunate for them, but doesn't change the facts about the issue actually discussed above.


User currently offlinefrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3761 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3515 times:

Quoting Rara (Reply 6):
- is generally cheaper (you get more performance for the same money)
- is ergonomically better (mouse, keyboard, large screen which sits in front of you rather than somewhere below you)
- lasts longer (less wear and tear)
- faulty components can easily be replaced, while for a notebook, it's often easier to just throw the whole thing away
- components can easily be upgraded
- more storage options for greater data security

  

I can see myself throwing a laptop in favor of a tablet, but I'm always sticking to a desktop at home. I can just do more with it that with any other device, provided it doesn't include mobility...

If anything, I'd say laptops are in danger of being evicted out of existence by tablets. They've already pretty much eaten the netbook market.



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently onlinekngkyle From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 404 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 3487 times:
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I agree with francoflier in saying that tablets are a bigger threat to laptops than desktops. I can't see myself ever not having a powerful desktop at home with large monitors for photoshop and multi-tasking. The 15 or 17 inch screen on a laptop just will not cut it for me. The laptop I have right now is pretty old and will need to be replaced within the next year or so. Right now the upcoming Microsoft Surface tablet/laptop crossover looks to be a pretty good replacement. Functionality of a laptop in a tablet.

User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 3486 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
No. Regarding the replacement of the notebook with the iPad it's already done. And that was the issue.

And you believe that CURRENTLY you are in the majority here among people who own both?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
they don't prioritize market share, but of course they want it nevertheless.

Everybody wants market share- that's not the thrust of Apple's business model though which was my point. Note that I'm not criticizing them for it any more than I would criticize Mercedes for the same reason.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
It isn't. It depends mainly on the capability and software support of the available products. iPhone and iPad are already penetrating the corporate world in substantial numbers due to thorough security features, extensive professional app support, good policy and deployment support and in numbers by far exceeding much cheaper alternatives.

That's because (as I said above) there are no decent alternatives which do the job at a lower price. To assume there never will be would be a losing bet- given a few hundred attempts somebody will get it right. Businesses generally decide what they need and then choose the cheapest option which fulfills that requirement.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
And they are penetrating multiple markets downwards from there, with the previous-year iPhones (currently staggered two years back, apparently about to increase that to three years with the just started distribution of the 3GS in India),

You should go to India and see the sort of people who own Apple products. They are the definition of a premium market.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
The argument was that "cloud computing" would never be accepted in the corporate world. And RIM has already proven that claim wrong.

At no point did I or anybody else claim such a thing. If I had RIM would not have proven me wrong- in fact their share price would support such an argument.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8266 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 3466 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 7):
Tell that to the Internet.

No need to. Apple determined it was an unnecessary battery drain and left it out of iOS. Other companies are moving away from it and, at some point, Adobe will discontinue development of it. If they haven't already.

These days it is sort of like some pople still using Win XP.


User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1372 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 3454 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 16):
No need to. Apple determined it was an unnecessary battery drain and left it out of iOS. Other companies are moving away from it and, at some point, Adobe will discontinue development of it. If they haven't already.

These days it is sort of like some pople still using Win XP.

Assuming Adobe are unable to adapt their product (which is not guaranteed), the web still contains an awful lot of Flash. Many sites will be around for a while before they're updated due to the glacial pace at which the web adapts. Some may never be.

You're right that Grandma won't care (I was being flippant about that part; I don't think Grandma knows what Flash is). For me (and others) though it will be a significant disadvantage for 3-5 years yet I think. And that's assuming the war with Adobe doesn't turn to a ceasefire now one of its protagonists is dead.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14026 posts, RR: 62
Reply 18, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3434 times:

i personally prefer a real keyboard for typing text over a touchscreen. This means I will keep notebooks.

Jan


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8266 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 3366 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 17):
For me (and others) though it will be a significant disadvantage for 3-5 years yet I think.

Considering the growth of iOS on the internet Flash is not a product that companies interacting with consumers will want to use.

Back to topic, while mobile devices on iOS or others mobile platforms are blowing out the door right now there is still a powerful market in the notebook area. Look at how well the MacBook Air is doing, and the Intel effort to follow it. And look at the top of the line Macbook with the Retina display.


User currently offlineTheCol From Canada, joined Jan 2007, 2039 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3335 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 7):

He probably meant that in the literal sense. Adobe's current patch/update for Flash has more bugs in it than you can shake a stick at.



No matter how random things may appear, there's always a plan.
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2839 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3325 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 18):
i personally prefer a real keyboard for typing text over a touchscreen. This means I will keep notebooks.

Microsoft is certainly betting on that. And they're giving you the option of a touchscreen if you want it.

I've personally never worked anywhere where an Apple product was used. It's possible that the FBO I used to work at may have migrated to a credit card reader on an iPhone like Squaredup so people don't have to go inside. Tablets and notebooks of any OS would not work in my industry at this time. At least not for everyday work. We had 1 person that did bid proposals that used a Mac, but that's it.

I can't even do my timesheet on a Mac.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12529 posts, RR: 25
Reply 22, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3256 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 9):
"Easily" is not a word I would use. If you're talking about a couple of people writing word documents then you might be right, but most businesses of any reasonable size have

A) Very strict security requirements
B) Very specific proprietary software requirements
C) Very strict availability requirements
D) Very strict customer contractual requirements, especially regarding A)

None of these are addressed by cloud computing right now, and even when they are (which will be a while), business practices are slow to adapt.

I think I'm more used to the expansive use of the term "cloud" which includes server and desktop virtualization based primarily on in-house server farms. If you allow for that definition, all of that stuff is there already, and one can argue it's easier to achieve in centrally mananged resource.

The traditional pain point of centralized computing is getting IT to roll out new applications, and virtualization helps there too. Apps are just sized to the amount of resources needed in the server farm, and chances are that the capacity is there waiting to be used, but if not, you already have a scalable infrastructure in place, so you just grow it. Gone are the days of each app having its own specific hardware, at least in my world.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 10):
No, not really. Even smartphones have extensive local computing capabilities and do in fact use them, too. They just have access to internet resources in addition to that, same as desktops or notebooks.

You are the one who brought up the mainframe metaphor, and for their era, one could say mainframe terminals had extensive local computing capabilities.

Also my replies were in the context of corporate computing, where from what I can see, a smartphone does not provide enough productivity to be the sole computing resource for an employee.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 10):
Actual smartphones or tablets have never been limited to that. Your description doesn't match what's really happening.

I think your view is ahead of reality in the corporate computing space.

A recent trip to the hospital did not show me employees toting smartphones or tablets to get their jobs done. I saw receptionists using thin clients running remote desktop software entering data much like it would have been done with a mainframe in decades past. I saw medical assistants rolling carts with laptops on them hooked up to things like ultrasound scanners. I saw a nurse toting a laptop from exam room to exam room. I saw a doctor walk into the exam room, and used a desktop PC sitting in the corner to pull up my records. Sure, they may all have had smartphones in their pockets, but none of them were in use to get their job done.

Same in the retail establishments I go to - no tablets or phones, all PCs still.

The only ones I see toting mobile devices are truly mobile workers - delivery folks, for instance.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
No. Regarding the replacement of the notebook with the iPad it's already done. And that was the issue.

Whether the notebook is still gathering dust somewhere is not.

Maybe in your world.

In my work environment, it's only been the last 2-3 years where you could choose between a Lenovo laptop vs a Macbook, and the Macbook is still a second class citizen.

Executive employees are allowed smart phones, but it's in addition to their choice of laptops.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
And in the tablet segment they have just increased their market share from 60% to 68% despite new competition and despite them holding the top of the market almost exclusively.
Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
They are indeed pursuing market share, just not at the substantial expense of margins.

Are you talking about Samsung here?  
Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
It isn't. It depends mainly on the capability and software support of the available products. iPhone and iPad are already penetrating the corporate world in substantial numbers due to thorough security features, extensive professional app support, good policy and deployment support and in numbers by far exceeding much cheaper alternatives.

Not in my world, yet. I'm sure they have the capabilities, but I certainly don't see widescale penetration.

Do you have some specific case studies that you'd like to point us to?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 12):
The argument was that "cloud computing" would never be accepted in the corporate world. And RIM has already proven that claim wrong.

Yes, that's true for the narrower version of "cloud computing".

Personally, as an early player I kind of think RIM slipped in through the back door, and many aspects of it's security and data retention model weren't given the same scrutiny as new cloud apps are being given today.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2085 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3244 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 22):
I certainly don't see widescale penetration.

That's what she said BTW



Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5695 posts, RR: 44
Reply 24, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3242 times:
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I've written before about the two large iMacs in our facility of 5-600 mostly Dell & HP desktops, they sit proudly in our reception area running the same Windows applications via MetaFrame as the rest of the organisation. Some, mainly the fanboys claim this is because they "look cool"... might be true, we know how those "creative, designer" types can be.
Finally found out the real reason, that wide, smooth bezel at the lower edge of the screen is an ideal location for the myriad of Post-It notes a receptionist accumulates!!  

Back to the PC is dead, we have a couple of iPads in our part the org, 1 was mounted in the wall of our large dining/break room as the RC for the AV system... it's bracket is still there but the iPad disappeared a couple of weeks back so maybe it wasn't up to that.*** The other is chained to a table in the same location for staff to use while on breaks... no one thought a power supply would be a useful thing so it just mostly takes up space.

Oh, again back to the PC is dead, there a few more tablets in use by the ones you would expect, marketing, publishing and other creative folk. As the concept of booking one of the readily available meeting rooms is a tough concept to grasp for these folk they often hold meetings in this large meal room so it is easy to observe them at play. It is amusing to watch these technologically advanced people struggle to present a plan or explain and work with spreadsheets etc while trying to hold their iPad up in front of a group of team members(or worse business partners and customers).. a simple laptop with a keyboard and mouse.. even a built in track pad.. would be so much more functional.( hell even a stand and KBD for the iPad would be a major step forward)

Note, I am a big tablet fan, use mine for a couple of hours a day during my lengthy commute, replaced a netbook that was rarely used in the same situation but I do have a reaonably potent desktop at home for graphics and Photo work.

*** AV system seems to have continued to function just as well without the iPad.



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
25 canoecarrier : A tablet is useful if you already have the presentation or document it and it doesn't require editing. Especially in presentations done over lunch or
26 Post contains images Revelation : But is it useful enough to justify the cost of purchasing and managing a 2nd device? I don't think it's true for the average corporate worker. Maybe
27 canoecarrier : My company certainly doesn't buy them for their employees. A couple of the owners use a tablet because they travel often and have more one on one mee
28 Ken777 : Mobile devices are moving into retailing. Apple was fast to make adaptions, but other companies (like Penny's) are moving there. Sam's is one of thos
29 canoecarrier : The strength of the Mac isn't running Windows on it. I have yet to run into a business or someone working at a business that has a Mac and consistent
30 VonRichtofen : Personally I prefer to have a desktop computer at home and a tablet for mobile use. I find notebooks do neither very well (much slower than desktops b
31 Post contains links Braybuddy : Certainly not in this house! I have absolutely no interest in going down the I-pad/smartphone route. For one I refuse to become an Apple victim, and
32 Aesma : I own a desktop PC, a (small) laptop and a (small) tablet and they each have their use. I spend most time on the desktop, with a full size keyboard an
33 zckls04 : I am amazed at how terrible Adobe's develop More worryingly, smartphones et. al. have killed the "pub argument", a time honoured tradition where group
34 Braybuddy : I can see in the not-too-distant future places where mobile internet devices will be banned. I read recently of a hotel where which uses it's wi-fi-f
35 Aesma : Yeah there is a fancy hotel in Portugal I think with no TV, no internet, and you have to power down your phone.
36 Revelation : Yes, this is about where things are at, not the widespread adaptation that was suggested here. The folks who have Apples all run Windows 7 in a VM. T
37 Braybuddy : Fantastic! I rarely turn on the TV when staying in a hotel, and sometimes not at all. The last weekend I was away with a friend the TV never got swit
38 na : Many people dont need a mobile computer. I much prefer a desktop as I need a big screen, and rarely need a mobile one. A secondhand I-Book is enough f
39 SuperCaravelle : I've never had any idea who can say we don't need desktop PC's anymore. Mobile devices will always be limited in size and having owned a smartphone fo
40 mham001 : I'm not so sure RIM did cloud computing any good. If anything, it was proven just last year that certain governments could pressure RIM enough to eit
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