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Any Runners? Advice Needed.  
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11533 posts, RR: 15
Posted (1 year 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 1833 times:

There is a 12K in San Francisco every May called "Bay To Breakers." I can hear some people snickering. It does have a somewhat "alternative" reputation. I want to run the whole thing in the serious category. I can run 3 miles non stop in 25 minutes and I still feel I want to go farther. I do this on the treadmill at the second elevation setting. So, instead of level, I am running uphill. I want to do B2B this coming May. I have decided to run every other day and push myself farther every week. Since I am doing 3 miles this week, I will go 3 1/4 miles next week and so forth. I am not looking to win, just to finish. Besides running, what can I do to prepare?


Life in the wall is a drag.
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19415 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (1 year 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 1825 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Besides running, what can I do to prepare?

Get a costume, drink heavily.

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
I want to run the whole thing in the serious category.

Find a different race?

OK, I'm being unhelpful, but you have to realize that B2B is what it is.

[Edited 2012-08-03 21:45:45]

User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5360 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (1 year 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 1821 times:

I went from basically being sedentary to running a half-marathon (13.1 miles) in 5 months.

The basic rule I followed was to add 10% each week, so long as you're feeling good. So, if you're able to do 3 miles now, 3.3 is your next goal.

Warning: treadmill running is vastly (in my opinion) different from road running. Your gait and stride are different. I spent the first month on the treadmill and when I hit the road, I felt terrible for the first week as I adjusted my running. The treadmill did improve my CV health.

As for other activities: don't neglect your upper body. It's amazing how much your arms help you through a run. Make sure you do not neglect your arms, shoulders and chest during your training. Take the day before your 'long slow run' and do a light, non-aerobic upper body work-out.

I'm currently training for a half-marathon running this November and am incorporating a once-a-week YMCA Body-Pump class and a spinning session into my weekly workout.

Feel free to ask more questions. This was the best thing I did for myself in a long time.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (1 year 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Find a different race?

OK, I'm being unhelpful, but you have to realize that B2B is what it is.

Join a centipede team. Make sure you and your teammates have equal abilities.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 2):
I went from basically being sedentary to running a half-marathon (13.1 miles) in 5 months.

I love to run that distance. Back in the day (junior year in high school), I ran my very first road race and it was a half-marathon. I ran it 1 hr 33 mins. Three years later I ran a personal best of 1 hr 20 mins.


Bay-to-Breakers Centipede Teams

http://ingbaytobreakers.aeg-webdev.com/uploads/images/Content/cent_4_lg.jpg



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5360 posts, RR: 14
Reply 4, posted (1 year 12 months 17 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 3):
love to run that distance. Back in the day (junior year in high school), I ran my very first road race and it was a half-marathon. I ran it 1 hr 33 mins. Three years later I ran a personal best of 1 hr 20 mins.


I just turned 43 when I started training for the first one. Ran it in 2:22:50, but was suffering from a upper respiratory deal that blew up into bronchitis that kept from running for 2 months and is forcing me, to basically start from scratch. I should have been able to run it in 2:10 or so based on my 10 mile pace.

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Besides running, what can I do to prepare?


Don't neglect your diet. I found as I increased my distance, I needed to change what I ate and how much I ate. Less "heavy" foods, more fruits & vegetables, cut out carbonated drinks and started drinking a whole lot more water. Reduced beer intake, but increased bourbon intake.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (1 year 12 months 16 hours ago) and read 1781 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Besides running, what can I do to prepare?

Any aerobic workout can help.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 4):
Ran it in 2:22:50

That's a lot better than I can do now. I don't think I can run a mile today. I'm also 70 lbs heavier and 32 years removed when I was in high school.   

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 4):
Don't neglect your diet.

For very long distances like the marathon, carbo-loading (carbohydrate) is essential. So drink beer and eat pasta.



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineajd1992 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (1 year 12 months 12 hours ago) and read 1765 times:

Adding 10% each week is a good rule. I would do that until you are running at least 80% of the distance comfortably, and the other 20% will come from the adrenaline of running the race as well as being a psychological thing too.

Good luck! 


User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2330 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (1 year 12 months 10 hours ago) and read 1741 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Besides running, what can I do to prepare?

Run on the streets. Abhor, detest and hate the treadmill!

Even if it rains, you can put on a baseball cap. There are headlamps for the dawn, night and dusk, and also prepare to run without having eaten anything for the previous 6-12 hours. Learn how your body will react to the various challenges. Get to feel the "wall", when your body craves for carbohydrates after having run for 60-90 minutes. (I often run up to 3 hours without any food.)

You should feel comfortable with hot, sunny days, as well as rainy, cold days. Self-confidence is something valuable, mental capabilites are also important.

Once, I took part in a run. It was on a sunny, hot day, and I nearly passed out - because when I'm running for myself, I always went in the fresh and comfortable evening.

Don't be afraid of exercising too much. If you feel wasted afterwards, just put in enough rest - which is actually more important than the hours you've spent running. Every form of training relies on the fact that the body repairs damages more than needed, giving you more strength, endurance or both for the next run.

With muscle soreness, put in 3-4 days of rest, otherwise one single day (meaning you will run on Monday, rest on Tuesday, run on Wednesday again). Get a feeling for how much rest you will need. Too much rest is wasting your time, too little rest will waste your body.

That is what has worked for me. Take what you can use, and be open to other hints. I'm comfortably running 12 miles on hiking paths now, and also in temperatures at or slightly above 32 degrees F.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 2):
Warning: treadmill running is vastly (in my opinion) different from road running.

Yes, that's a big problem. Like climbing in a hall, and climbing on the rocks.

As I never run on a treadmill, but always on a asphalt-dirt road-hiking path mixture (20%, 60% and 20% or so) I don't have that problem. I'm accustomed to the various surfaces.

Quoting ajd1992 (Reply 6):
I would do that until you are running at least 80% of the distance comfortably, and the other 20% will come from the adrenaline of running the race as well as being a psychological thing too.

Right. That's what every training manual will say - you can't run the same time in your training as during the competition. What would be the point of it? (Well, I do not run in competitions....  )


Edit: That you are running uphill on the treadmill is a good thing. But there is a danger... what is when you are running downhill once? You will be damned, because you haven't trained your knee ligaments and the musculus rectus femoris.

When doing mountain hiking, the pains in the knee ligaments are sometimes killing me. So I do some serious downhill running in the days before, get my 2-3 days of rest, and then I won't have problems.



David

[Edited 2012-08-04 06:33:19]

[Edited 2012-08-04 06:35:54]


Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1124 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (1 year 12 months 9 hours ago) and read 1724 times:

Run outside, as others have said. If you can't arrange to run on real roads or trails all the time, do it at least once or twice a week. In your location, running gear shouldn't be too much of a problem even in winter. When you run in cold weather, just layer, and good gloves (1 or 2 layers, breathable) will take care of most of it.

Go with the flow. If you're feeling good, don't be afraid to add a little extra that day (don't go wild though!). If you're feeling crap or sick, don't be afraid to cut it short or take a day off. You can generally lose up to about a week without losing any real fitness ground. Vary your distances a bit, don't run the exact same thing every day.

I agree that some upper body or cross-training will help. You don't need to go wild with the weight, you just need enough to remind your shoulders that they are there. Swimming would be an excellent alternative if you can get to a pool.

If you are running 3 miles now, you won't have any problems at all hitting 12k next spring as long as you stick with running. You could probably do it now under race conditions, although you might not be too happy during the last few kilometers!



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11533 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (1 year 12 months 7 hours ago) and read 1710 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
you have to realize that B2B is what it is.

The focus is on the "alternative" wave at the end, but there is a serious road race. Some people use it as a warm-up for the marathon season. I have never and will never understand people that start drinking heavily at 6AM and try to finish a 12K. Heck, I don't understand people that are drunk before noon!

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 2):
treadmill running is vastly (in my opinion) different from road running.

I knew that and that is why I have been doing the incline while running. I thought it might help.

All these are great plans! Thank you all so much!



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5360 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (1 year 12 months 5 hours ago) and read 1683 times:

Quoting seb146 (Reply 9):
I knew that and that is why I have been doing the incline while running. I thought it might help.

As stated, how do you train for the downhills? Run outside. You can lengthen your stride a little on the downhill, but don't overstep yourself.

If you're feeling pain in your legs, outside, shorten your stride a little bit. It will slow you down, but will lessen your pain.

Good luck.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineus330 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 3868 posts, RR: 14
Reply 11, posted (1 year 12 months 4 hours ago) and read 1667 times:

stretch, cross train, and do some weights.

User currently offlinecorocks From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 1213 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1530 times:

Your biggest problem is going to be burning out before the race gets here. You only need to increase your distance by 4 miles in the next 8 months - piece of cake. I would mix in a lot of other exercises and only run 1-2 days a week for a while. Otherwise, before long you will be running 12k in your sleep and then the challenge will go away and you will lose interest before the race.

User currently onlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1527 times:

Try to think of a schedule you can maintain forever.

And be careful about injuries. You can't run well in the future if you create lasting injuries now. It is best to take it very easy until you are very comfortable upping the intensity. The transition from treadmill to street could be not only tricky, but hazardous. Don't go out of your comfort zone. Not worth an injury.

Too often, people think of running as a torture necessary to prepare for an event. I love running and will always do it. Point is, listen to your body and when it warns you of injury, stop and reassess.


User currently offlineMarSciGuy From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 549 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1515 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
There is a 12K in San Francisco

I was going to mention NOT running or exercising every day, but it seems I was beaten to the punch... start off slow, like you are, then build up distances... Once you have the distance you want (always train for longer distance than the race itself) then start doing timed workouts, trying to improve your per mile and per race times. Good luck and have fun!



"There weren't a ton of gnats there where a ton of gnats and their families as well!"
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