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Lord Rothschild Takes £130m Bet Against The Euro  
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10899 posts, RR: 37
Posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1915 times:

... fears continue to grow that the single currency will break up.

The member of the banking dynasty has taken the position through RIT Capital Partners, the £1.9bn investment trust of which he is executive chairman.

The fact that the former investment banker, a senior member of the Rothschild family, has taken such a view will be seen as a further negative for the currency.

The latest omen follows news in The Daily Telegraph late last week that the government of Finland is already preparing for the euro’s break-up.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/f...kes-130m-bet-against-the-euro.html

The Rothschilds are very influential.

What will happen if the Euro breaks up is anyone's guess.

It is like attacking Iran. So far it's just talk.

   Wow!


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21468 posts, RR: 53
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1832 times:

As far as I can see he is merely betting on the exchange value of the Euro going down at the specified time. It is conventional currency speculation.

His bet has nothing to do with a breakup of the eurozone as far as I can see.


User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1742 times:

''...bets against the Euro'', as Klaus rightly explained, means nothing more than investing [~making a bet] in another currency, the value of which he expects to develop favorably against the Euro.

The Euro is simply not going to collapse, because letting it collapse would in any event cost so much more money than any stabilization act could ever cost. Everybody would be a loser in such an event, so why would anybody involved let it come to that? To speak in the words of rapper and esteemed economic guru Tony Yayo ''if it don't make money then it don't make sense''.



..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10899 posts, RR: 37
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1706 times:

Quoting something (Reply 2):
The Euro is simply not going to collapse, because letting it collapse would in any event cost so much more money than any stabilization act could ever cost.

Some E.U. countries are preparing for the break-up of the Euro zone. I think I have heard there's going to be a referendum in Germany to find out if the people agree with the E.U. bailouts.

Also...

Finland is preparing for the break-up of the eurozone, the country’s foreign minister warned today.

The Nordic state is battening down the hatches for a full-blown currency crisis as tensions in the eurozone mount and has said it will not tolerate further bail-out creep or fiscal union by stealth.

“We have to face openly the possibility of a euro-break up,” said Erkki Tuomioja, the country’s veteran foreign minister and a member of the Social Democratic Party, one of six that make up the country’s coalition government.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/f...ares-for-break-up-of-eurozone.html

Maybe they are tired of paying off other countries debt and they want to leave the Euro zone?

I don't see how the Euro will survive if some of the Euro member countries are leaving and turning back to their old currencies.

 



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21468 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1694 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 3):
I think I have heard there's going to be a referendum in Germany to find out if the people agree with the E.U. bailouts.

There is no such referendum in any planning stage.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 3):
Finland is preparing for the break-up of the eurozone, the country’s foreign minister warned today.

Finland has a domestic problem with a rabidly anti-european populist party. This is an obvious attempt to appease its supporters, but this kind of tactic has never worked.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1660 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):

... fears continue to grow that the single currency will break up.

He's not betting against keeping the zone together, he's betting against the value, which in this case is basically a bet against the PIIGS.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7914 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1607 times:

I don't see anything groundbreaking. And I'm sure EVERY EU country has *some* plan for if the Euro collapses... it's very unlikely but it would be stupid not to have some kind of a clue of what you'll do if that happens.


Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 4022 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 1571 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Thread starter):
The Rothschilds are very influential.

Yes, along with the Bildebergs and the Illuminati...

Quoting Klaus (Reply 1):
His bet has nothing to do with a breakup of the eurozone as far as I can see.

Correct. Unfortunately there is currently no way for anyone to hedge themselves against a full break-up of the Euro. I know plenty of companies who would love to find a way to protect themselves and their European investments for when that happens, but there is no way to do so.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 3):
Some E.U. countries are preparing for the break-up of the Euro zone

I would say every responsible country is, along with every responsible company. Even if you think the chance is remote, would you want to be the risk manager left with no plan or course of action if it happens?



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1469 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 5):
He's not betting against keeping the zone together, he's betting against the value, which in this case is basically a bet against the PIIGS.

Stay classy anglosphere.

It was a forced meme to begin with and doesn't even include pig numero uno: the UK.



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineU2380 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2010, 325 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1438 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 8):
It was a forced meme to begin with and doesn't even include pig numero uno: the UK.

It's funny, after a while you can read the username and know what's coming without actually needing to read the main body of the post. Until you posted the UK hadn't even been mentioned/

Could you just remind us again, which country recently received a EU bail out? Hint: It wasn't 'pig numero uno'.

Lets all hope that the Euro doesn't go bang, it would lead to some pretty torrid times across Europe. Although I agree that it is prudent for many countries and companies to be planning for as many eventualities as possible.

[Edited 2012-08-20 13:53:28]

User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1413 times:

Quoting U2380 (Reply 9):
It's funny, after a while you can read the username and know what's coming without actually needing to read the main body of the post. Until you posted the UK hadn't even been mentioned/

It's funny, after a while one only needs to see the flag right next to the user name and know what kind of knee-jerk reaction is coming, without acutally needing to read the main body of the post.

Oh really.. the UK hadn't been mentioned? What is 'Lord' Rothschild from Afghanistan??



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineU2380 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2010, 325 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 1403 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 10):
after a while one only needs to see the flag right next to the user name and know what kind of knee-jerk reaction is coming

Sorry, after you directly referenced a particular country in a less than favorable light during your post were you not expecting to get a reaction from a citizen of said country? I note that you skipped over the question I asked. Funny that.

Quoting Asturias (Reply 10):
What is 'Lord' Rothschild from Afghanistan??

'Lord' Rothschild is representing himself and his company in this case, not the UK. So no, your comments were unfounded. The UK was not specifically mentioned, not in the post you quoted nor anywhere else in this thread.

[Edited 2012-08-20 15:42:34]

User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 1396 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 8):
Stay classy anglosphere.

We both know he isn't betting against the Germans.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1334 times:

Quoting U2380 (Reply 11):
Sorry, after you directly referenced a particular country in a less than favorable light during your post were you not expecting to get a reaction from a citizen of said country? I note that you skipped over the question I asked. Funny that.

Sorry, after another poster directly referenced a particular country in a less than favorable light during his post, you were not expecting to get a reaction from a citizen of said country?

What is it about lack of self-awareness and constistant double-standards that seems to afflict a certain people on the internet?

That being said, answer your question, because A) if you didn't know the answer, perhaps you should google it and B) if you thought you already had the answer, then I can't be bothered with such nonsense.

But if you want to know about pig numero uno, it is an island nation with way higher debts than Spain. Good luck with that.

Quoting U2380 (Reply 11):
'Lord' Rothschild is representing himself and his company in this case, not the UK. So no, your comments were unfounded. The UK was not specifically mentioned, not in the post you quoted nor anywhere else in this thread.

By the 'virtue' of him being a 'lord' of the UK, whatever he does, says or acts upon is always implicated with the UK. He's part of the legislative branch, the upper house of parliament, thus his interests and the interests of the state he represents are naturally assumed to be in a permanent affiliation.

Now if it was just Mr. Richy Investor Jr. of hedgefund X of London, then perhaps you'd have a point: but you don't.

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 12):
We both know he isn't betting against the Germans.

In a sense he is, at least betting against the German, French and UK banks that poured lent money into the Greek state or into the Spanish beach resort bubble.

Or to put it another way, his 'bet' is that the Euro will be devalued - like the USD has been for the last decade or so - and in that sense betting against the Germans who do not want to devalue the Euro.

And the forced meme is just infantile.



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6669 posts, RR: 11
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1317 times:

Well, some loss in value of the euro (like has already happened) is quite good especially in current times (not for everybody of course), so in a way it's not an offensive bet, unlike betting on the collapse of the currency. Of course, why such bets are possible and why they aren't taxed is another matter...

About countries planing the collapse of the currency, I'd say some university economists are probably studying the possibility, but no real money or commission or whatever is involved.



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