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What's Up With Your Defintion Of "American"?  
User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3187 times:

I've discovered that people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans?

What's up with that? History, popular culture and the media has defined the word "American" and "Americans" to be those individuals who come from the United States of America, and/or live in the United States of America.

Never does it refer to someone from South America. I mean, if a Columbian said to me, "I'm American", but they didn't possess a US passport or reside in America, I would really question their intelligence.

What is your take on the word?

[Edited 2012-08-21 19:35:09]

61 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3657 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3180 times:

Based on the word itself, every person from the Americas is an American. You are right that the word has become synonymous with US citizens but that is just due to its everyday use. Grammatically, the Colombian you mentioned would be right.

I noticed the same thing with the word "Asian" and how it is perceived in different regions of the world. In the UK, "Asian" could mean Indian, Pakistani, Chinese, Japanese etc. "Asian" in the US strictly means a person from the Far East.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15781 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3163 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
What is your take on the word?

American pertains to the USA. Canadians are North Americans, but not American. Colombians are South Americans, but not Americans.

Quoting lewis (Reply 1):
In the UK, "Asian" could mean Indian, Pakistani, Chinese, Japanese etc. "Asian" in the US strictly means a person from the Far East.

Sometimes I'll notice an Indian referred to as Asian, but for the most part people from Asia seem to be grouped into Arabs or Middle Easterners, Indians, and Asians.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinescrubbsywg From Canada, joined Mar 2007, 1495 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3157 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 2):
American pertains to the USA. Canadians are North Americans, but not American. Colombians are South Americans, but not Americans.

According to dictionaries, American does not only specifically refer to the USA.


User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3997 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3147 times:

There is something that is referred to as Americas, wich consist of North America ( including USA and Canada ), Central America and South America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americas#America_or_Americas

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_america

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_America

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_America

I would say that " US Americans" are from the USA in North America, while Brazilians, Colombians etc. are from South America and Mexicans, Costa Ricans etc are from Central America.

Personally I would refer to someone coming from the USA as coming from the USA but also American living in North America, but those who come from Brazil for instance as Brasilians coming from Brazil in South America.

The Colombian that you refer to is a Colombian but also a South American


Might aswell throw in a link for the Latin Americans and Indigenous Americans:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_americans

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_peoples_of_the_Americas

[Edited 2012-08-21 19:33:16]

[Edited 2012-08-21 19:34:53]

User currently offlineAeri28 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 709 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3107 times:

I'm on a few UK and French website/forums. Never ever heard that term. US Americans. LOL

I would not doubt some may refer to that as a sort of defiance and I think there are some who would "like" that to be so, sort of taking back that word, but it aint gonna happen. For the most part, when you hear the word "America' and "American", I bet you know exactly who is the topic, regardless if the term 'can' include chileans, argentines, boliivians etc.

United States of America = America and Americans. Not US America or US Americans or even USians. I've heard that one thrown around.

Just my (and millions of others) opinion.


User currently offlineBraniff747SP From United States of America, joined exactly 6 years ago today! , 2997 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3098 times:

It's merely the way language is used. Technically, the Colombian would be right--but no one would use it in that sense. It's quite interesting: in Spain, many people refer to Americans as 'norteamericanos' which means 'North American". We would use 'North American' to refer to an American, a Canadian, or a Mexican. However, they add an unneeded 'north' to the word when talking about someone from the US. I've always found it interesting.


The 747 will always be the TRUE queen of the skies!
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10107 posts, RR: 26
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3088 times:
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Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
History, popular culture and the media has defined the word "American" and "Americans" to be those individuals who come from the United States of America, and/or live in the United States of America.

Um, clearly not, if:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans


...



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19954 posts, RR: 59
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3076 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):

I've discovered that people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans?

There's North America, South America, and the United States of America. For some reason, while I agree that "American" without a qualifier ("North, South, Latin, etc.) would suggest USA, some people feel a need to add a preface.

HOWEVER, in Spanish, "Americano" is more commonly shorthand for SOUTH Americans (more linguistic and cultural commonality). But Americans are called "Norteamericano" (North-American) or "Estadounidiense" (essentially: "United Statesian"). When I speak about myself in Spanish, I call myself "Estadounidiense." It also helps clarify because when speaking Spanish, my accent places me as a Spaniard (I was raised speaking it), which can confuse Spanish-speakers.

Quoting lewis (Reply 1):
Based on the word itself, every person from the Americas is an American.

I agree. Except there is only one country in the world with the name "America" in its common name. No other country in the world has the name "America" in its common name. Every non-American from the Americas can call himself "Canadian" or "Ecuadorian" or whatever. As an American, I find it inconvenient to have to refer to myself as anything other than "American" when speaking English.

Furthermore, when speaking English, it's very obvious that I'm either American or Canadian. No Canadian would ever call himself "American." So when I say "American," I expect that it's understood what I mean.


User currently offlineArrow From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 2676 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3049 times:

Now that we've thoroughly fleshed out what an American is, let's have a discussion around what a "US Person" is. Should be entertaining once a little data has been unearthed.


Never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3997 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3049 times:

Canadians can also be referred to as to be Americans, in the sence that Canada is part of North America.

I also beleave that in a US passport it says that the bearer is not from America, but from United States of America and that the bearer is not an american citizen, but a US citizen or a citizen of United States of America

[Edited 2012-08-21 22:09:41]

User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15781 posts, RR: 27
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3042 times:

Quoting Arrow (Reply 9):
Now that we've thoroughly fleshed out what an American is, let's have a discussion around what a "US Person" is. Should be entertaining once a little data has been unearthed.

I have no idea other than that I am one and that seems to be all anyone cares about.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3997 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3038 times:

Quoting Arrow (Reply 9):
Now that we've thoroughly fleshed out what an American is, let's have a discussion around what a "US Person" is. Should be entertaining once a little data has been unearthed.

US person is someone that is a citizen of United States of America and not for instance Colombia.


User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5499 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3032 times:

Quoting Mortyman (Reply 10):
Canadians can also be referred to as to be Americans, in the sence that Canada is part of North America.


They can be...but are they?

I'm thinking that's the point.

I have a cousin in Greece that used to refer to me as his US-American cousin. As in: "This is my cousin, Fr8Mech, he is US-American". To which I would say, "no, I'm Greek-American".

For whatever reason, when someone is referred to as an American, he is understood to be from (or living in) the United States.

And, to open a slightly different can of worms, I really don't consider myself Greek-American...I'm an American of Greek descent...even though I was born in Greece. Spent the vast majority of my life here.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19954 posts, RR: 59
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3027 times:

Quoting Arrow (Reply 9):
Now that we've thoroughly fleshed out what an American is, let's have a discussion around what a "US Person" is. Should be entertaining once a little data has been unearthed.

Someone from the U.S., typically either a legal resident alien or citizen.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15781 posts, RR: 27
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3017 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 13):
I really don't consider myself Greek-American...I'm an American of Greek descent...even though I was born in Greece. Spent the vast majority of my life here.

What's funny is when just any black person is referred to as "African American." LeBron James is African American. Usain Bolt is not African American.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3008 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 15):
What's funny is when just any black person is referred to as "African American."

Yet there are those who insist that a certain person is a Kenyan Muslim.      


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3005 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 8):
HOWEVER, in Spanish, "Americano" is more commonly shorthand for SOUTH Americans (more linguistic and cultural commonality). But Americans are called "Norteamericano" (North-American) or "Estadounidiense" (essentially: "United Statesian"). When I speak about myself in Spanish, I call myself "Estadounidiense."

That's pretty much it.

To us, America is the whole continent, which in turn is composed of North, Central and South America as their subcontinents. The IOC seems to agree with us, as America has a single ring as it seems the "America" and "American" to refer exclusively to the US is a post-WW2 phenomenon.

An Argentinian, Brazilian, Jamaican or Canadian are equally American to us, and considering they outnumber "Americans" in your continent I'd say they have a good point.


User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2981 times:

Quoting JJJ (Reply 17):

An Argentinian, Brazilian, Jamaican or Canadian are equally American to us, and considering they outnumber "Americans" in your continent I'd say they have a good point.

Yeah but I'm sure most of Asia, India, Australia, New Zealand refer to US Citzens/residents as Americans, Spanish-speaking countries are outnumbered.

Plain and simple... American or Americans refer to citizens of the United States of America.


User currently offlineAeri28 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 709 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2971 times:

I think they were talking about being Chileans here.. (not that there's anything wrong with being from Chile!)

"Tu vuò fà l'Americano"
by Renato Carosone and Nicola Salerno

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDS-eeZfxn0


Seriously, I have heard that the word "Americano" (in south america etc) can also refer also to themselves (it was also in the Spanish language film "Motorcycle Diaries),, and that the Spanish may refer to us as Norteamericanos or however it was expressed, but I would bet if the average person was in a country and said either "I am American" , "Je suis Americain" "Yo soy Americano", "Ich bin Amerikaner" or 'America" "Amerique" Amerika", more than likely, unless being pedantic, you would know pretty much where the person was coming from. Irregardless of Dictionary meaning or historical text. I mean, would an Ecuadorian go to London and say "I'm an American from America. Take me to the American Embassy" where Assange is located.?

I think, much to somes chagrin, the US has taken this as their own, or it has, for a large part, become synonymous with the US, and yes, technically the other explanations ring true, but if I walked into a bar in Algiers , chances are I'd be asked if I was American.

This defination gives both choices lol.

amerikan c
1. inhabitant of the Americas
2.. A person born in, or a citizen or inhabitant of United States of America


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2963 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 18):
Yeah but I'm sure most of Asia, India, Australia, New Zealand refer to US Citzens/residents as Americans, Spanish-speaking countries are outnumbered.

Not for Asians, they're mostly in the 5+1 continent camp (5 inhabited continents plus Antarctica), so do Greeks and other European countries.

For the Anglosphere, sure.


User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10107 posts, RR: 26
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2961 times:
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Quoting AA7295 (Reply 18):
Plain and simple... American or Americans refer to citizens of the United States of America.

Again, clearly it doesn't, given this:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans

Not sure why you have an issue with a different usage of the term. The continent is called North America. Referring to its residents as Americans makes perfect sense, even if you or I don't use the term that way.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2946 times:

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 19):
"Yo soy Americano"

If you said that (unless the accent was obviously Anglo) the reply would be, "Sure, we knew that already from your accent, but which country in America?"


User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2298 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2944 times:

In Romania, "american" is used to refer to someone from the USA or as an adjective referring to something made in the US. For example, we refer to people from South America as a whole as "sud-american".

User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2114 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2913 times:

In German "amerikanisch" most often refers to the United States, but technically it could refer to anything of the American continent, so we like to add the qualifier "US-amerikanisch" just to make clear what we're talking about. If we're talking about people, it seems a bit redundant, but in other cases it makes sense. "American west coast" for instance could refer to the whole Western stretch of the continent, while "US-American west coast" makes it clearer, at least in German.

Interestingly, if I were to speak of a "Nordamerikaner", i.e. north American, it would be implicit that I want to include Canadians and Mexicans as well, not only US citizens.



Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlineozglobal From France, joined Nov 2004, 2723 posts, RR: 4
Reply 25, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2896 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
I've discovered that people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans?

What's up with that? History, popular culture and the media has defined the word "American" and "Americans" to be those individuals who come from the United States of America, and/or live in the United States of America.

Never does it refer to someone from South America. I mean, if a Columbian said to me, "I'm American", but they didn't possess a US passport or reside in America, I would really question their intelligence.

What is your take on the word?

You're post just shows how completely you inhabit the angloshpere. This is, I hope you recognize, a minority of the planet. Even if most English speakers use American to refer to the US, US-Americans are outnumbered by Spanish and Portugese speakers on the same super continent, who may see it differently. You are just telling us how committed you are to the conventions of English usage. OK, duly noted...  

Indians, Chinese and other Asians when speaking their first language are usually not speaking English anyway, so no pont invoking their numbers for you argument.

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 18):
Plain and simple... American or Americans refer to citizens of the United States of America.

Really, what a fuss. A little pluralist nuance may be good for the sole...

US-American is a perfectly understandable term by all and it is also perfectly understandable that Latin Americans may choose to use it when they speak English. There should be nothing offensive in it.



When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 26, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2859 times:

Quoting JJJ (Reply 17):
To us, America is the whole continent, which in turn is composed of North, Central and South America as their subcontinents. The IOC seems to agree with us, as America has a single ring as it seems the "America" and "American" to refer exclusively to the US is a post-WW2 phenomenon.

Eh you're about as spanish as spotted dick. Clearly you need to change your flag.

To us spanish, «americanos» usually means people from the US, on the other hand if we speak of a person from being from america (es de América) it can be more ambiguous, but again usually just referring to a person from the USA.

On the other hand we would almost always refer to the USA as EE UU, not 'America'.



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineAM744 From Mexico, joined Jun 2001, 1780 posts, RR: 0
Reply 27, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2863 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 8):
HOWEVER, in Spanish, "Americano" is more commonly shorthand for SOUTH Americans (more linguistic and cultural commonality). But Americans are called "Norteamericano" (North-American) or "Estadounidiense" (essentially: "United Statesian"). When I speak about myself in Spanish, I call myself "Estadounidiense." It also helps clarify because when speaking Spanish, my accent places me as a Spaniard (I was raised speaking it), which can confuse Spanish-speakers.

This is the way to go.   

I'm fine with the use of 'American' in the Anglosphere. In Spanish it can get confusing and most importantly it sort of questions the 'Americanism' (as in Americas) of Latin Americans, leading to pointless arguments and hurt feelings.


User currently onlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8329 posts, RR: 9
Reply 28, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2863 times:

Look at our alternatives.

United Statesers?   

Oddly enough a lot of people use a tag related to the state they live in, like Texan.

So we are down to being called Americans. Canadians might have a right to join in on that title, but seem to prefer to call themselves Canadians. Same in Mexico.

I guess it is simply an acknowledgement that United Statesers is too awkward.


User currently offlinebogota From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 819 posts, RR: 1
Reply 29, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2843 times:

I also understand that for a large part of the world American means from the United States of America, but in Latin America and especially when speaking Spanish, American is from the Americas. Historically America existed long before the pilgrims launched for Boston so for Spanish, French and Portuguese America, America is the whole continent and Americans are all of its inhabitants.

For the purpose of not hurting feelings I fully accept to refer to Americans when speaking English in the Anglo world, I refer to US-Americans when speaking English outside the Anglo world and I refer to people from the USA as "estadounidense" but mostly "gringo" (which is NOT a derogatory term in Colombia) when speaking Spanish.

This is an eternal discussion that will never reach an agreement, so compromises must be made.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6728 posts, RR: 12
Reply 30, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days ago) and read 2767 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 28):
I guess it is simply an acknowledgement that United Statesers is too awkward.

Yep, you need to come up with a real name for your country !

In French États-Uniens is occasionally used, often when you're about to say something bad about the US. It's common for communist/trotskyst politicians for example (and we have a number of those). Apparently it's also used in a similar manner in Québec. Incidentally when I visited Canada the Quebecois that housed me talked about West Canadians as "les anglais" meaning the English !

There is actually a fully fledged French Wikipedia article on the question : http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9...m%C3%A9rique_et_de_leurs_habitants

I couldn't find an equivalent on English Wikipedia. It deals with usages in French but also Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Esperanto, Italian. Another suggested English name for Americans is Usanian.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 31, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days ago) and read 2761 times:

I think it's fine to call people from the US 'American' in english, and in other languages can be different (as the case may be)

Different languages, different names.. Usanian or Unitedstatsian just doesn't work for me :P



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineWrenchBender From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1779 posts, RR: 9
Reply 32, posted (2 years 2 months 4 days ago) and read 2759 times:

Up here we just call them "Yanks" or "Y'alls" depending on which side of the Mason-Dixie line they come from..... 

WrenchBender



Silly Pilot, Tricks are for kids.......
User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2298 posts, RR: 7
Reply 33, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2744 times:

Statesman could work but it already has a different meaning. 

User currently onlineLonghornmaniac From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 3332 posts, RR: 45
Reply 34, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2743 times:

US Americans   

"Americans" refer to people from the USA. I don't care how it's defined in the dictionary, I have thoughts. You wouldn't ever hear a born and raised Mexican refer to themselves as a "Mexican American." It just doesn't work that way. As said, history has defined Americans as "Americans." I had this argument with a French guy in a Madrid hostel. It's a stupid argument.

If someone asks you where you're from and you say "America," never will the follow up be "which country?"

Cheers,
Cameron


User currently offlinebogota From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 819 posts, RR: 1
Reply 35, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2717 times:

Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 34):
I don't care how it's defined in the dictionary,

If that works for you is fine, just don´t ask others who do not agree to call you as such. Around this side of the world you are either a US American, estadounidense or gringo like it or not.

Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 34):
As said, history has defined Americans as "Americans."

For some parts of the world, for other parts of the world history goes further back my fellow American.

Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 34):
I had this argument with a French guy in a Madrid hostel. It's a stupid argument.

If you are still having this type of arguments then it was not a stupid argument, it was simply a different perspective on the real world.


User currently onlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8329 posts, RR: 9
Reply 36, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2696 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 30):
Yep, you need to come up with a real name for your country !

We're OK on the name of the country, it's us folks who live here that are the problem.

Quoting WrenchBender (Reply 32):

Up here we just call them "Yanks" or "Y'alls" depending on which side of the Mason-Dixie line they come from..... 

That probably works as well as anything we can come up with.

And far better than what some would use.  Wow!


User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5675 posts, RR: 6
Reply 37, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2689 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 28):
Look at our alternatives.

United Statesers?

Bingo. "American" has become the default adjective when describing a US national, as no other suitable word in English was used.

It's cool to discuss, but I hate it when people get offended because of it.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlinesccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5555 posts, RR: 28
Reply 38, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2681 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 8):
Except there is only one country in the world with the name "America" in its common name. No other country in the world has the name "America" in its common name. Every non-American from the Americas can call himself "Canadian" or "Ecuadorian" or whatever. As an American, I find it inconvenient to have to refer to myself as anything other than "American" when speaking English.

Common sense, thy name is Lightning.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 8):
Furthermore, when speaking English, it's very obvious that I'm either American or Canadian. No Canadian would ever call himself "American." So when I say "American," I expect that it's understood what I mean.

My best friend calls himself an "American" (or, equally frequently, a "Texan," which we all know is the highest and best form of American   ), but he was born and raised in Canada. He is a naturalized (excuse me, "naturalised") citizen, now.

It is from knowing this fellow that I have come to understand that no one appreciates what we have more than someone who is here by choice.

---

Back on-topic: I believe that it is sound communication practice to refer to US Citizens as "Americans," but I am not comfortable with the presumption that "America" is automatically synonymous with "United States of America."



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently onlineLonghornmaniac From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 3332 posts, RR: 45
Reply 39, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2657 times:

Quoting bogota (Reply 35):
US American, estadounidense or gringo

I've been to 5 South American countries and have never heard the term "US American" (nor anywhere else). Of course I've heard "estadounidense" because it's the demonym for USA in Spanish. Just like "American" is the demonym for USA in English.

Quoting bogota (Reply 35):
For some parts of the world, for other parts of the world history goes further back my fellow American.

All I'm saying is that if you, as a Colombian, referred to yourself as American, people in every country I've ever been to would be initially confused (that is, if they knew you were from Colombia). The name America is derived from Amerigo Vespucci, the explorer who discovered the "Americas," so of course it has different roots. But all the same, language evolves, and in all of the 6 continents and 45 countries I've been to, not a single person has ever expressed any confusion when I say I'm American. No one has ever asked me if I was from Canada, or anywhere else in the Western Hemisphere which has been come to be known as the Americas. It was understood that I was from the United States.

Quoting bogota (Reply 35):
If you are still having this type of arguments then it was not a stupid argument, it was simply a different perspective on the real world.

You had to be there. He was being intentionally obtuse.

Quoting sccutler (Reply 38):
which we all know is the highest and best form of American

  

Quoting sccutler (Reply 38):
Common sense, thy name is Lightning.

Yessir.

Quoting sccutler (Reply 38):
Back on-topic: I believe that it is sound communication practice to refer to US Citizens as "Americans," but I am not comfortable with the presumption that "America" is automatically synonymous with "United States of America."

Absolutely spot on.   

Cheers,
Cameron


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 40, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2653 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 26):
Eh you're about as spanish as spotted dick. Clearly you need to change your flag.

That's where I was born, always lived and can trace as far back. Which one would you suggest I use?

Now working in a company (in ol'Castile) which is partly owned by a Mexican conglomerate and at any given time there's 6-8 of them working with the home team at the lab (mostly Mexicans, USaians and Chileans) guess what they're all called around here: "americanos" none of them are more american than the other


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 41, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2626 times:

Quoting JJJ (Reply 40):
"americanos" none of them are more american than the other

Btw: here's what the RAE has to say about the subject:

americano, na.

1. adj. Natural de América. U. t. c. s.

2. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a esta parte del mundo.

3. adj. indiano (‖ que vuelve rico de América).

4. adj. estadounidense. Apl. a pers., u. t. c. s.

5. f. Chaqueta de tela, con solapas y botones, que llega por debajo de la cadera.


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 42, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 2602 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 28):
Look at our alternatives.

United Statesers?  

   That's the root of it. We would have the same problem if we didn't also call our country (inaccurately) Great Britain or Britain -> British.

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
I've discovered that people from continental Europe and South America tend to refer to Americans as US-Americans?

I can't speak for the rest of continental Europe or for South America but in the UK "American" tends to pertain to the USA.

However, it seems we're not alone...

Quoting dc9northwest (Reply 23):
In Romania, "american" is used to refer to someone from the USA or as an adjective referring to something made in the US.
Quoting Rara (Reply 24):
In German "amerikanisch" most often refers to the United States
Quoting Asturias (Reply 26):
To us spanish, «americanos» usually means people from the US

That said...

Quoting ozglobal (Reply 25):
US-American is a perfectly understandable term by all and it is also perfectly understandable that Latin Americans may choose to use it when they speak English. There should be nothing offensive in it.

  


User currently offlineSmittyOne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 43, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 15):
What's funny is when just any black person is referred to as "African American." LeBron James is African American. Usain Bolt is not African American.

Charlize Theron is an African American...LOL. I really dislike that term, for being so damned imprecise. The only one of those "PC" labels that makes any sense to me is "Native American".

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 28):
I guess it is simply an acknowledgement that United Statesers is too awkward.

Exactly. The simple truth is that using "American" as shorthand for a "person from the United States" is the best linguistic option for everyday use (in English anyway), even if there is a larger geographical region also called "the Americas".

Though I suppose some would try to poke us in the eye that this is some sort of evidence of US arrogance...granted we are arrogant but this ain't it.  


User currently offlinebogota From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 819 posts, RR: 1
Reply 44, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2509 times:

Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 39):
All I'm saying is that if you, as a Colombian, referred to yourself as American, people in every country I've ever been to would be initially confused (that is, if they knew you were from Colombia). The name America is derived from Amerigo Vespucci, the explorer who discovered the "Americas," so of course it has different roots. But all the same, language evolves, and in all of the 6 continents and 45 countries I've been to, not a single person has ever expressed any confusion when I say I'm American. No one has ever asked me if I was from Canada, or anywhere else in the Western Hemisphere which has been come to be known as the Americas. It was understood that I was from the United States.

I don´t refer to myself as American because my nation is Colombian, but that does not mean either that I am not American. Just like people from France are French but also European. If in the future some nations become the United Nations of Europe then they might decide to call themselves Europeans, does that mean those belonging to those nations not part of the United Nations of Europe are not considered Europeans? Obviously not.

So as I said earlier for me and most other of the 500 million non Anglo Americans, people from the USA are in general US-Americans, Estadounidenses or Gringos. In other parts of the world then Americans are from the USA. especially in the Anglo World. No hard feelings my fellow American.


User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 45, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2477 times:

Quoting JJJ (Reply 40):
That's where I was born, always lived and can trace as far back. Which one would you suggest I use?

Sure, of course you are..

Quoting JJJ (Reply 41):
Btw: here's what the RAE has to say about the subject:

Thanks, we can actually look up the dictionary, but in Castilla y León, where I am from, americanos is usually for people from the USA.

Quoting JJJ (Reply 40):
Now working in a company (in ol'Castile)

as spanish as spotted dick jjj



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineSmittyOne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 46, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2471 times:

Quoting bogota (Reply 44):
I don´t refer to myself as American because my nation is Colombian, but that does not mean either that I am not American. Just like people from France are French but also European. If in the future some nations become the United Nations of Europe then they might decide to call themselves Europeans, does that mean those belonging to those nations not part of the United Nations of Europe are not considered Europeans? Obviously not.

So as I said earlier for me and most other of the 500 million non Anglo Americans, people from the USA are in general US-Americans, Estadounidenses or Gringos. In other parts of the world then Americans are from the USA. especially in the Anglo World. No hard feelings my fellow American.

Well said! Pretty simple really.

Quoting Asturias (Reply 45):
as spanish as spotted dick

LOL this is just wrong.


User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1862 posts, RR: 1
Reply 47, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2468 times:

Quoting Asturias (Reply 45):
as spanish as spotted dick jjj

Thankfully you're not the one handing passports.


User currently onlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8329 posts, RR: 9
Reply 48, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days ago) and read 2449 times:

Quoting SmittyOne (Reply 43):
I really dislike that term,

I do too - too many syllables.

I have a friend Down Under who could be called African Australian. What color do you think he is?

In terms of calling us Americans, it would be too hard to change. Worse than going metric, which is a massively expensive effort that some idiots would probably push us into some day.


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8969 posts, RR: 39
Reply 49, posted (2 years 2 months 3 days ago) and read 2439 times:

I have no problem calling US citizens Americans while also knowing I am an American - South American. Calling US citizens "North Americans" is weird, unnecessary and still commits the supposed "error" in question because Canadians and Mexicans are also North Americans.

"US-Americans" is just dumb.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8969 posts, RR: 39
Reply 50, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2427 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 18):
Plain and simple... American or Americans refer to citizens of the United States of America.

So if a Swiss shows up in an EU country and is greeted with "welcome to Europe!" how is he gonna react?



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineSmittyOne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 51, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2414 times:

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 48):
I have a friend Down Under who could be called African Australian. What color do you think he is?

What about a Frenchman of the negroid race who moves to the US. Is he an African American? That makes no sense.

Likewise, what the hell happens if an African-American (a person of the negroid race born and raised in the US) moves to Africa? They'd call him an American, would they not?

Honestly I have no idea what is wrong with calling somebody "Black", since "White" still seems perfectly acceptable.

All of this angst over labels - whether it is "American" or something else - is so silly to me. It is the intent behind the language that really counts. If you are an ass it doesn't matter what words you use, nor should people be pulled through the knothole for simple errors in terminology.


User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 52, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2392 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 50):

So if a Swiss shows up in an EU country and is greeted with "welcome to Europe!" how is he gonna react?

Your argument is invalid. Switzerland is part of the continent of Europe. It is not part of the European Union. The European Union does not define "Europe".


User currently offlinebogota From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 819 posts, RR: 1
Reply 53, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2376 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 52):
Your argument is invalid. Switzerland is part of the continent of Europe. It is not part of the European Union. The European Union does not define "Europe".

You are absolutely right, just like The United States of America does not define America.


User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 54, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2373 times:

Quoting bogota (Reply 53):
You are absolutely right, just like The United States of America does not define America.

So you're saying if a Colombian boards a flight from Bogota to Washington DC, and the CBP officer says "Welcome to America", that person is going to raise their eyebrows and be like "I have not left America?".

Me thinks not.


User currently onlineLonghornmaniac From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 3332 posts, RR: 45
Reply 55, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2368 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 54):

Winner, winner, chicken dinner.

Cheers,
Cameron


User currently offlineTransIsland From Bahamas, joined Mar 2004, 2046 posts, RR: 9
Reply 56, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2360 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 52):
Your argument is invalid. Switzerland is part of the continent of Europe. It is not part of the European Union. The European Union does not define "Europe".

Huh? Colombia is part of the Americas. It is not part of the United States of America. The United States of America does not define "America."

As somebody from the Americas, an English-speaking part of the Americas at that, I use the term U.S. American for people and things pertaining to the United States of America, and say American when referring to people or things from the entire hemisphere in general.

Funny, how U.S. Americans get upset when we reclaim what they wish to monopolise.



I'm an aviation expert. I have Sky Juice for breakfast.
User currently offlineAeri28 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 709 posts, RR: 0
Reply 57, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2336 times:

I don't see anybody getting upset here, I tried looking at the posts above, seems calm, just people with adamant positions. I think, at times, when Americans are adamant in their views and opinions and don't budge, it may be taken as "arrogant', or "not taking criticism" but it really is just simply not backing down and expressing what we believe. It's a trait of ours.   I"ve heard the term 'arrogant Americans' here and there... But I assure you it's not intentional  


-
-

RE the African American phrases, MY opinion, unless I am not part of that club, it really is not for me to say how I feel they should be classified. Throughout history in the United States, the black community or African American community has used different phrases to describe themselves. t's an internal thing. Internal to their community and internal to the U.S. What other countries do is up to them.


User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5499 posts, RR: 14
Reply 58, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2334 times:

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 57):
RE the African American phrases, MY opinion, unless I am not part of that club, it really is not for me to say how I feel they should be classified. Throughout history in the United States, the black community or African American community has used different phrases to describe themselves. t's an internal thing. Internal to their community and internal to the U.S. What other countries do is up to them.



The following sums up my feelings:

"Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready." ~Woodrow Wilson, 1919

There is a longer, more abrasive quotation by Theodore Roosevelt that might go a touch too far, but has the gist of my attitude. It can be found here and read in its full context here.

But, that's a topic for another day



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineSmittyOne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 59, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2302 times:

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 57):
Throughout history in the United States, the black community or African American community has used different phrases to describe themselves. t's an internal thing. Internal to their community and internal to the U.S. What other countries do is up to them.

Sure, my point is that I'm not going to apply the term "African-American" to a person simply because they are of a particular race. I don't know where their their family is from and I think it's a poor assumption that they must be descendants of the African slaves brought to the US.

If a person considers himself African-American then I'm fine with referring to them that way. To the extent that I'd have a reason to refer to their race at all...which should be minimal.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Azerbaijan, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 14079 posts, RR: 62
Reply 60, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2293 times:

Quoting SmittyOne (Reply 59):

Sure, my point is that I'm not going to apply the term "African-American" to a person simply because they are of a particular race. I don't know where their their family is from and I think it's a poor assumption that they must be descendants of the African slaves brought to the US.

What about our fellow A.netter SW733? He is of the caucasian race, has been born and grown up in Namibia, which defintely is in Africa, of American parents and has dual citizenship (now living in the US)? By birth he is an African, but also an American.
He would be a true African-American.

Jan


User currently offlinebogota From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 819 posts, RR: 1
Reply 61, posted (2 years 2 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2260 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Reply 54):
"Welcome to America", that person is going to raise their eyebrows and be like "I have not left America?".

No, he/she is just going to think " These people still think they own America." Which is what we all think. Does it affect us, no it is part of life, just as Latin Americans also believing themselves as Americans also. Why does it affect you so badly, you have to understand it is a fact of life, regardless if you like it or not. Plus when you arrive at the USA they usually say Welcome to the United States of America.

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 57):
I think, at times, when Americans are adamant in their views and opinions and don't budge, it may be taken as "arrogant', or "not taking criticism" but it really is just simply not backing down and expressing what we believe.

Which Americans are you referring to US Americans or Americans from other American Nations?

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 60):
He would be a true African-American

This political correctness is new to Colombia, we tend to call Blacks as Blacks (negro) whites as white, fat as fat, thin as thin and nobody really takes offense in it. And although calling somebody negro is still a term of endearment, the black community has begun referring to themselves also as African American (afroamericano) and very rerely as afrocolombian.


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