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WW2 Bomb Will Go Off In The Middle Of Munich Soon  
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5875 times:

Another month, another bomb.

This time the WWII bomb was located in the middle of Munich, Munich Schwabing - a nice residential and nightlife district.
I myself must have walked a couple of yards past the bomb more than only once (slight understatement). It is a chilling feeling: the bomb sits only one meter (3 ft) deep, weights 500 lb / 250 kg and the chemical fuze "looks brand new and will definitely go off if you move it" the spokesperson of the bomb squad says. They can't even move it.

3,000 people have been evacuated since yesterday evening, some 10,000 sand bags and I-don't-know-how-many bales of straw are supposed to protect the nearby houses when they the blow that thing up.
It is only a matter of hours ....

Some pictures:
http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/bo...lindgaenger-fotostrecke-86715.html


I support the right to arm bears
42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8913 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5859 times:

Looks like they found it while doing some digging. How would you like to be the jackhammer operator who discovered it?




Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5851 times:

That's right, Dreadnought.

Okay, the bomb went off, one house or some houses are burning, reports say. Damn!

Edit:
Looks like four houses are burning. In hindsight it was a bad idea to bring all that straw ...

[Edited 2012-08-28 13:43:34]


I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5817 times:

Quoting NoUFO (Reply 2):
That's right, Dreadnought.

Okay, the bomb went off, one house or some houses are burning, reports say. Damn!

Edit:
Looks like four houses are burning. In hindsight it was a bad idea to bring all that straw ...

A little interesting you hear about finding an old bomb in Germany fairly often, but I can't ever remember hearing about them found in Japan. That said, they did the right thing and didn't try and move it. Maybe next time they will use wet straw instead of dry straw.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5736 times:

Maybe they thought the straw was wet, because it had been raining for hours. But it seems that something with the "controlled explosion" went entirely wrong.

Nice (if you can put it this way) video here:
http://vimeo.com/48399328



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5734 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 3):
A little interesting you hear about finding an old bomb in Germany fairly often, but I can't ever remember hearing about them found in Japan.

That's becasue the weapon of choice in bombing Japanese cities was incendiaries .

[Edited 2012-08-28 15:36:45]

User currently offlineVenus6971 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1443 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5723 times:

Did they find a British tall boy found near somewhere on the Rhine recently?


I would help you but it is not in the contract
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2449 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5716 times:

Quoting Venus6971 (Reply 6):
Did they find a British tall boy found near somewhere on the Rhine recently?

Yes, some months ago. It was near Koblenz in the Rhine, but it was a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockbuster_bomb , not a Tall Boy. The bomb was successfully defused.



David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10237 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5575 times:
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Quoting NoUFO (Reply 4):
Nice (if you can put it this way) video here:

My god. It's utterly unfathomable to think that in the heat of WW2, you could have dozens of those going off every night, if not every hour.

For someone like me who hasn't lived through a war in my own country, it's just amazing.



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8913 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 5526 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 8):
My god. It's utterly unfathomable to think that in the heat of WW2, you could have dozens of those going off every night, if not every hour.

You mean thousands. Each B-17 would carry a dozen of them.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinebongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3648 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5405 times:

Four houses on fire, good job it wasn't a British 4000lb "blockbuster"

User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2449 posts, RR: 14
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5401 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 8):
For someone like me who hasn't lived through a war in my own country, it's just amazing.

Still hundreds and hundreds of bombs are still found today. As somebody coming from Switzerland, alone seeing the cities of Nuremberg and Mannheim where post-1945 buildings predominate makes me sober.


Some impressions from Munich: http://www.zeit.de/gesellschaft/zeit...schehen/2012-08/bg-bombe-muenchen1


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineWolbo From Netherlands, joined Mar 2007, 492 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 5325 times:

Seems to be WWII Bomb Week. We had two discovered in The Netherlands just in the last week (Schiphol, Nijverdal).

User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3677 posts, RR: 29
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 5310 times:

Good thing is, there are many aerial shots available from British and American sources, so bombs can be systematically searched for. In my street in Hamburg we had two bombs defused this year.

Usually it is no big deal, however this bomb had a very dangerous long term fuse.


User currently offlinebongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3648 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 5289 times:

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 13):
Good thing is, there are many aerial shots available from British and American sources, so bombs can be systematically searched for. In my street in Hamburg we had two bombs defused this year.

Statistics show that for much of the early part of the War the RAF hadn't a clue where the bombs were dropping, apart from the conclusion that they were ending up nowhere near the target. Crews routinely reported which towns and cities thyeehad bombed, but what firm eveidence there was showed that the Countryside was the main recipient.


User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7965 posts, RR: 12
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5274 times:

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 14):
Statistics show that for much of the early part of the War the RAF hadn't a clue where the bombs were dropping, apart from the conclusion that they were ending up nowhere near the target.

And then many bombs were dropped in emergencies. Tourists visiting the Baltic Sea are sometimes warned not to pick up what appears to be amber. It could be white phosphorus leaking out of shells sitting on the bottom of the sea. There are naval vessels clearing the Baltic Sea (as well as the North Sea), but they simply aren't fast enough.
Some people picked up the "amber", and as soon as the phosphorus was dry it started burning causing severe burns. White phosphorus, as you probably know, is self-incendiary.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09oBuk0L-rE&feature=youtu.be&t=2m10s

Back to Munich: Reports say analysts had to check the structures of the adjacent houses, 17 of which are damaged so much or covered with so much dirt (inside - the windows shattered) that residents cannot go back in.



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5207 times:

Quoting LMP737 (Reply 5):
That's becasue the weapon of choice in bombing Japanese cities was incendiaries .

I researched this a little more last night. Okinawa seems to have a really big problem with unexploded ordinance from WW2. They find bombs and artillery shells almost weekly. There was a story I found where construction workers on a road expansion project found a total of 902 unexploded bombs under a restaurant.

There are other articles about unexploded high explosive bombs being found around Tokyo and Osaka but much less frequently. Remember that the US and British navies also did tactical bombing in harbors, I wouldn't be surprised if there are unexploded bombs in Japanese harbors.

Either way, in Munich it sounds like the authorities in Munich did the right thing, even with the damage to surrounding structures.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineLMP737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5190 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 16):
I researched this a little more last night. Okinawa seems to have a really big problem with unexploded ordinance from WW2. They find bombs and artillery shells almost weekly. There was a story I found where construction workers on a road expansion project found a total of 902 unexploded bombs under a restaurant.

Okinawa had some of the most intense fighting of the war so I'm not surprised they find stuff there.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14127 posts, RR: 62
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5116 times:

Manila also has a problem with unexploded WW2 ordnance from the Battle of Manila in 1945. On the forme fortress island of Corregidor (which used to guard, together with three other, smaller, islands the entrance of Manila Bay) there are still tunnels under the hills which are full of the remains of dead Japanese soldiers and explosives. When the American troops recaptured the island in 1945 many Japanese soldiers blew the tunnels, in which they were hiding, up to prevent capture. These tunnels have only been partially excavated.

The neighbouring Carabao Island is still off limits because it is contaminated with unexploded bombs and shells. A small detachment of the Filipino Navy on this island will open fire at anyone unauthorised coming close to the island

As for the bomb in Munich, it had a chemically operated longtime delay fuze. It was supposed to explode hours or days after the bomb attack to disturb recovery and rebuilding operations. While the British equivalent could still be made safe using some tricks, the American variant (as in this case) is practically boobytrapped. Any attempt to remove it will set it off.

Jan


User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 5080 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 18):
Manila also has a problem with unexploded WW2 ordnance from the Battle of Manila in 1945. On the forme fortress island of Corregidor (which used to guard, together with three other, smaller, islands the entrance of Manila Bay) there are still tunnels under the hills which are full of the remains of dead Japanese soldiers and explosives. When the American troops recaptured the island in 1945 many Japanese soldiers blew the tunnels, in which they were hiding, up to prevent capture. These tunnels have only been partially excavated.

When I was looking into this last night I ran into this study on WWII unexploded ordnance on four pacific island countries: Kiribati, Palau, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

http://www.forumsec.org.fj/resources...achments/documents/UXO%20final.pdf

I had always known WWII ordnance was a problem in modern day Europe but I hadn't thought much about places like the Philippines and the island battlefields of the Pacific.

Even if you don't read the study, there's a lot of interesting photos of what they find: unexploded mortar rounds, grenades, naval artillery shells, bombs, cases of machine gun rounds, etc. You'd think the battlefields of Europe are probably littered with the same stuff. Especially around the WW1 battlefields.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14127 posts, RR: 62
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 5076 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 19):
Especially around the WW1 battlefields.

A few years ago Belgium was the country with the highest amount of WDMs. It was all the WW1 gas shells, which the farmers in Flanders regularly plough to the surface.
The farmers just stack the shells on the sides of their fields and once a week an Army truck will come and pick them up.

Jan


User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 5041 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 20):
The farmers just stack the shells on the sides of their fields and once a week an Army truck will come and pick them up.

So how often does any of this ordinance explode? I read last night that a few years ago a tractor driver on Okinawa got blinded because he dug up an unexploded shell that...exploded. And, NoUFO says sometimes WP is unintentionally ignited by tourists.

I think the takeaway is that this stuff is nearly everywhere a battle has been fought.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14127 posts, RR: 62
Reply 22, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5019 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 21):
And, NoUFO says sometimes WP is unintentionally ignited by tourists.

The WP is one of the lesser problems there. Big areas of the Baltic and North sea have been used to dump unneeded chemical shells and bombs after WW2. Now they corrode and the contents (mainly mustard gas, which in fact has a consistency from oily liquid to rubber-like gel) is being washed to the shores. This stuff gives nasty burns, which take a long time to heal.

As for the Belgian shells, I haven´t heard of accidents. Apparently the farmers are pretty good in identifying old ordnance and can distinguish those which are safe to handle and those which need to be blown up in situ.


BTW, Northern Africa (Western Egypt, Libya and parts of Tunesia) are contaminated with minefields from WW2. In the desert climate they stay live forever.

Korea is AFAIK prettty much contaminated as well.

Jan


User currently offlineTheCommodore From Australia, joined Dec 2007, 2922 posts, RR: 8
Reply 23, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4997 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 22):
As for the Belgian shells, I haven´t heard of accidents. Apparently the farmers are pretty good in identifying old ordnance and can distinguish those which are safe to handle and those which need to be blown up in situ.

The Dutch have been dealing with unexploded mines in the North sea for some time now.

Only a few years back, 3 fishermen were killed on a trawler when they snagged one in the nets, it exploded on deck killing all on board.

Here is a video of the Royal Dutch Navy, blowing some old ordinances up.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=0cd_1346086071



Flown 905,468 kms or 2.356 times to the moon, 1296 hrs, Longest flight 10,524 kms
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4985 times:

Quoting TheCommodore (Reply 23):
The Dutch have been dealing with unexploded mines in the North sea for some time now.

Aren't most of the WW1 mines contact mines? As the cables keeping them below the sea surface rust they get free and float to the surface. Then any ship that comes by and hits one could blow up.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
25 TheCommodore : Not sure exactly, but i'd imagine that most of the WW1 mines have rusted and floated free by now, but I may be wrong. Seems as though most of the tro
26 flyingturtle : Okinawa was a conventional battle, no strategic bombing like on mainland Japan. So, very few incendiary bombs were used. Different times, different b
27 PanHAM : Happens rarely that ordnance explodes accidentaly. Last I can remember was a couple of years ago on an Autobahn contructions site near aschaffenburgt,
28 LMP737 : Yes I know incendiaries were not the weapon of choice there. Lots of 250-500l pounders and anywhere from 5in-16inch naval gunfire support.
29 canoecarrier : How are they able to find unexploded ordinance using reconnaissance photos? There was a B-17 strike on Schweinfurt in '43 that had 230 aircraft. On a
30 NoUFO : Unexploded ordnance creates much smaller craters - in which it is buried. Trouble is, a bomb won't follow a linear path under the surface of the grou
31 PanHAM : There are experts in all fields, as noUFO explained, unexploded ordnance has a much smaller crater. Since the RAF took pictures before and after the r
32 Post contains links canoecarrier : Fascinating information. Thanks for sharing. It's amazing just how many times Cologne was bombed during WWII. Mostly it was the RAF but the US sent t
33 mainMAN : Unimaginable, isn't it? The bombing of German cities was unrelenting in comparison with what most UK cities had to endure (perhaps with the exception
34 NoUFO : So do I. The school building looked evil to me for the mere fact there was a mushroom shaped siren on top of the roof. After the wall fell, most of t
35 PanHAM : When you look at the "luxury problems" people have today it is hard to imagine what people had to endure in these days. My mother lived in a small ci
36 canoecarrier : Interestingly enough, tonight there was a documentary on about Japanese naval history during WWII. At the end of the war, the US didn't disband the Ja
37 GEEZER : All of this talk about unexploded ordinance reminded me of an incident that happened when I was in the Navy, about 1953; the ship I was on, the U.S.S.
38 DocLightning : Have to hand it to the Nazis: they were persistent if nothing else. Before WWII, the USA also had an extensive passenger rail network. My father, who
39 aloges : I found it interesting how sirens affect some of you, for a particular reason: the sirens in my hometown were, and still are, tested on every first Sa
40 NoUFO : Well didn't some Pentagon / Central Command / Whatever paper say Germans had a life-expectancy of 72 hours should the cold war turn hot? By the way:
41 CPH-R : It took a while, but last year we finally managed to clear the last of the mine fields left by the Germans after WW2. Approximately 72,000 mines were
42 PanHAM : That's petty cash compared to the economic impact of the Oktoberfest which is about 1 Billion €
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