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Practicing Manual Driving  
User currently offlineaf773atmsp From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2688 posts, RR: 1
Posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3204 times:

I never really considered practicing driving a manual transmission car, but that changed recently after I got a job at a car dealership. My first time driving a manual was a month ago in my uncle's Saturn L200, and after stalling it many times I discovered how tough it is. After beginning my job at the dealership I have rare encounters with manual cars, and all I have to do is park it in the lot, so I'm in first gear the whole time. I have been getting better, and stall a lot less. The manager was even kind enough to let me practice in a Volkswagen GTI with a manual transmission thats on the used car sale lot. Now I have been pretty much teaching myself how to drive manual, and the GTI is actually pretty easy to drive.

So for those of you who have mastered driving a manual transmission, how long did it take, what car did you practice with, and any bad experiences with manual cars?


It ain't no normal MD80 its a Super 80!
85 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8841 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3199 times:

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
So for those of you who have mastered driving a manual transmission, how long did it take, what car did you practice with, and any bad experiences with manual cars?

I learned to drive on a 1971 Chevy C-10 pickup, with a three-on-the-tree manual. The straight-6 engine had mountains of torque, and would not stall no matter what I did, but it would lug. Till the day he died, my grandfather (who taught me) blamed his neck pains on the first day he took me to an abandoned airstrip to learn how to drive.

But after the first day, I never had any more problems. And after the C-10 (whose clutch was almost either in or out, very little in between) all other manuals were easy.

To this day I still prefer manuals. You have a lot more control, especially in hilly areas. I can't imagine a bad experience with a manual.



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User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10036 posts, RR: 26
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3185 times:
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Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
how long did it take

Took a few weeks till I was comfortable driving around. Took a few more months before I really felt I was proficient at it. Frankly, even after driving manuals exclusively for 6 years, I still think I'm learning.

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
what car did you practice with

A 2002 Civic EX. 1.7 liter 127 horsepower, 5-speed. A very easy car to learn on - hard to mess up. Only thing is, with low horsepower/torque, you do occasionally have to be wary of stalling, especially on an incline. But the car was at 114,000 miles or so when it got totaled, still on its first clutch, engine, and gearbox.

I'm currently driving a 6-speed Mazda 3 with a 2.5 liter 160-something horsepower engine, and even that jump in engine power took some getting used to. Plus, there's something about the throttle and/or clutch that still bothers me a bit, at least compared to the Civic....Otherwise, I love the car.

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
and any bad experiences with manual cars?

No, nothing that wouldn't happen in an automatic.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 1):
To this day I still prefer manuals.

Me too. But it seems that they're getting to be harder to find, at least in the US, which makes me sad.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineFabo From Slovakia, joined Aug 2005, 1219 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3169 times:

I have never driven an automatic, so I suppose I am not really the person you are looking for.

Anyway, it did not really take me a long time to learn to work the clutch. The trick is to learn to feel when the clutch is just about in but not quite yet. I found that having to get a really underpowered car (Skoda 120L) going in a small incline did help me get the feeling. Getting the driving school car moving and stopped just by using clutch (no brakes, no gas) on a level ground might also help (although I did not do that much, really).

After that, it is only about practice. You just have to drive stick for a while until it all becomes second nature. I had my situation made a bit harder by the fact that I had only passed the tests after moving out for college, so I did not drive at all for several months after getting license. Everything fell into place though after driving almost daily when I returned home for summer. These days I only ever stall after not driving for 2-3 months and then only if I change cars within first day or two.



The light at the end of tunnel turn out to be a lighted sing saying NO EXIT
User currently offlineAzoresLover From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 757 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3147 times:
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I first drove a manual shift in college at Ohio State. I had a trusting roommate who needed me to help drive on a trip, so he spent a few minutes one evening showing me how to drive a manual. After a few stalls I "sort of" got the hang of it. The next morning we took off for St Louis, with me driving. That round trip helped me to become pretty adept at driving a manual. So I have always preferred a manual, for the reasons stated in above posts. My latest car, a 2012 Chevy Cruze, has a 6-speed manual, and I totally love that car!


Those who want to do something will find a way; those who don't will find an excuse.
User currently offlinebjcc From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 327 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3138 times:

Easiest way is to learn to drive a manual first, then an automatic. But it's clearly too late for that.
It takes a while to get used to clutch control, and it probably doesn't help if you have no one to show you the tricks of the trade. When I learned to drive, my instructor had me using the clutch to control the car on a hill, that was a good way of learning to control the clutch.


User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4833 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 3117 times:

a little gas first then ease it out increasing the gas as you do it. Japanese cars tend to have soft clutches (which are easier), euro's tend to be firmer (harder), both have their benefits... a firmer clutch is usually better on a higher performance engine whilst a softer clutch helps an underpowered engined car get going.


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User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3307 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3062 times:
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Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
how long did it take

It took me about two days until I was comfortable driving on the public roads, but I have a vast technical knowledge about cars so I was able to learn what I was doing wrong very quickly.

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
what car did you practice with

My 2000 Ford Focus ZX3 (2.0L, 130HP), 5-sp manual. I, to this day, love that freaking transmission. The clutch was nice and heavy and the gear changes were buttery smooth.

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 2):
there's something about the throttle and/or clutch that still bothers me a bit

I don't know if your car has the same clutch as mine (I don't think so), but if it does, the thing that feels "unusual" is the spring-loaded return. It's a hairline clutch, it's either all the way in, or all the way out, with nothing in between. I actually love it 95% of the time, except when I'm on a steep incline. I burned the crap out of the clutch last week once at an uphill traffic light when the guy behind me pulled up so close I had no room to roll at all.

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 6):
Japanese cars tend to have soft clutches (which are easier), euro's tend to be firmer (harder)

That's funny, because my friend has a VW GLI (I have a Mazdaspeed3) and his clutch is like a soft pillow compared to my spring-loaded one. We switched cars last month and while I loved his GLI before I got my Mazda, I don't think I could ever go back to a car without a spring-loaded clutch anymore. The amount of leg force I need on my Mazda's clutch is ludicrous, but I actually really like it.

TIS



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User currently offlineLarshjort From Denmark, joined Dec 2007, 1475 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3057 times:

The car used to take my driving license was a 1998 Mecedes E230CDI 5 speed manual with 450.000km on the clock

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 7):
My 2000 Ford Focus ZX3 (2.0L, 130HP), 5-sp manual. I, to this day, love that freaking transmission. The clutch was nice and heavy and the gear changes were buttery smooth.

That description fits my 2003 Fiesta 1,6. On the other hand the clutch in my mothers 2010 Fiesta 1,4 is extremely soft.

/Lars



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User currently offlineCharles79 From Puerto Rico, joined Mar 2007, 1331 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3032 times:

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
So for those of you who have mastered driving a manual transmission, how long did it take, what car did you practice with, and any bad experiences with manual cars?

Didn't try learning until I was 26 and did it in a rental car in Germany. It was 2006 in a Seat Altea and I had two reasons to learn. First, it was a skill I wanted to acquire and, second, because we were going to drive from Bottrop to Berlin and I didn't want to ride shotgun the entire time (plus it wouldn't be fair on my other half to drive the entire time). I can't say I mastered it right there but I learned enough to be able to share driving duties in the Autobahn.

Fast forward to the end of 2008 and by then I had driven enough manual transmission cars to feel confident enough to buy a manual car. Since then I have only driven automatics as rental cars and do not miss them at all. I no longer stall the car, plus our current vehicle (a VW GTI) has a great clutch and transmission set-up making it very easy to drive the car smoothly.


User currently offlineDarksnowynight From United States of America, joined Jan 2012, 1365 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3018 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 1):

To this day I still prefer manuals. You have a lot more control, especially in hilly areas. I can't imagine a bad experience with a manual.

Also your fuel econ is more easily controlled this way. My car should get about 31mpg on the highway. In practice (skipping gears on the A-bend, N-gearing it down hills, etc...), I get about 37 and maybe 29 city. I managed to pull about 580mi out of my last (16.8 gal) tank. Not bad for a 4cyl Sonata.

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 2):

Me too. But it seems that they're getting to be harder to find, at least in the US, which makes me sad.

I think this is due to the advent of CVTs and "manu-matics." I'm really not a fan of the latter, and irrespective of what people sometimes try to tell me, I really don't see them as the same as a true manual...



Just out of curiosity, anyone ever notice how much dropping into top gear waaaaaay early (like 30mph) and winding all the way up to 95 feels a lot like a CostIndex 0 takeoff? Not that I would ever do such a thing, of course,  



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User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8279 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2992 times:

Hard to remember - it was 53 years ago.   
I seem to remember that it only took a day for the basics. Dad was a mechanical engineer (he wanted to get a job in Detroit in the Great Depression) so was a car fanatic. A day with him and you were doing OK. I was even taught to hold the car with the clutch at a light on a hill that first day.


User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7914 posts, RR: 51
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2980 times:

Ah manuals... still not very good at them but it's a necessary skill (IMO) because when you need it the most, you won't have time to learn it.

First time I drove a manual, I started from 5th gear @ 80mph (lol, crazy story.) Really learned to drive manual in the hills of Dahlonega, GA, probably not the best place to learn. Still haven't really mastered getting the vehicle going from a standstill when I'm on a hill...



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User currently offlineFabo From Slovakia, joined Aug 2005, 1219 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2971 times:

Quoting AzoresLover (Reply 4):
My latest car, a 2012 Chevy Cruze, has a 6-speed manual, and I totally love that car!

Slight OT, but my dads car is also a Cruze, albeit a 5 speed, 1.8L. The car could really do with a sixth gear, especially on highways... And some nice V6. I still like the car very much though, would not mind getting one of my own.

Quoting Darksnowynight (Reply 10):
Just out of curiosity, anyone ever notice how much dropping into top gear waaaaaay early (like 30mph) and winding all the way up to 95 feels a lot like a CostIndex 0 takeoff? Not that I would ever do such a thing, of course,  

Technically, Cost Index does not kick in until after 10K ft, in (unrestriced) climb mode. But I understand what you mean (lets say a maximum derate takeoff).

And no, dont do that. Personally, I would not even cruise in top gear at 30 (although some people advocate it...), let alone accelerate.



The light at the end of tunnel turn out to be a lighted sing saying NO EXIT
User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3307 posts, RR: 13
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2964 times:
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Quoting Fabo (Reply 13):
And no, dont do that. Personally, I would not even cruise in top gear at 30 (although some people advocate it...), let alone accelerate.

Low-rpm, high-gear acceleration is perfectly fine in a naturally-aspirated car. You certainly don't want to do it in a turbocharged or supercharged car, though...

TIS



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User currently onlineKaphias From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2952 times:

Learned on a 2000 Subaru Legacy Wagon; my mom drove it to a parking lot the day we bought it and I spent about 10 minutes feeling it out. Took it out on the road and drove to the store, then home. A week later we had an unexpected first snow of the season, and I was out driving to school with one week of manual experience on a car with nearly-bald summer tires. I've never driven any other manual to compare it to, but I'd really like to some day.


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User currently offlineNewark727 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 1363 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2863 times:

I'm in no way proficient with a manual transmission but both of my parents' cars have had them and so I've practiced on a 2004 Mini Cooper (briefly) and a 2011 VW Jetta diesel (started to get the hang of it.) Both times the venue would be an office parking lot on a weekend- California has no shortage of such things where I am. With the Jetta I managed to get into traffic for a while too but I hated it because when I did make a mistake there was more pressure to get back up to speed again. I think the problem for me is translating the action of working the gears and clutch in isolation with no other factors to consider into working the gears and clutch on the road with traffic.

User currently offlinejetmech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2699 posts, RR: 53
Reply 17, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2845 times:

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
what car did you practice with

I like you got a job in the service department at a car dealership where I was performing work on new vehicles. There were a very high proportion of manual cars in those days (more than 15 years ago), so I had no choice but to learn quickly. I'd never driven manual before, so I ended up learning on all the customers’ cars. I serviced about 15 cars a day on average, so it didn't take long to get a lot of practice in. This was mainly on passenger vehicles with a few four wheel drives thrown in.

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
how long did it take

I'd say about a week to be comfortable and confident with moving cars across the road, and a few more weeks before driving in public.

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
any bad experiences with manual cars

Not yet. My current manual car is misfiring allot, so it needs quite a few revs on board and very deft use of the clutch for hill starts, but aside from that, no real negative experiences.

Regards, JetMech



JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offlinepanam330 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2679 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2813 times:

I learned how to drive a stick in a car I was test driving back in 2008 (a Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec V). The salesman gave it to me overnight to "get acquainted with it," and my roommate took me to a huge abandoned parking lot to teach me. I got it down in like 20 minutes, give or take. Damn near emptied the car's gas tank driving aimlessly that night. I bought a Subaru with a 5-speed after I wrecked my first car, and now my 2010 Saab is a 6-speed manual. I'll never buy an automatic again until I need a bigger car for kids.

User currently offlinebohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2700 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2808 times:

I learned to drive a manual in a 1967 Volkswagen Bus on the streets of San Francisco. Once I learned the basics of the manual I had to learn how to get it moving while facing uphill without rolling backwards. I stalled the engine quite a few times until I learned the parking brake was my friend.  

User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19727 posts, RR: 58
Reply 20, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2802 times:

I learned at 17 on my 1993 Ford Escort.

My father won "quote of the year" when telling me how to handle the accelerator vs. clutch:

"You have to be slow and gentle. Like making love to an old woman."

Yup, that's a great bit of advice to give to a 17yo boy.   

Like any motor skill (motor as in use of your body, not the car), it takes practice, practice, practice. The only way to learn is by doing.

By day 3, I was pretty proficient. By week 2, I was very good. By month 2, I was double-clutching and accelerating more smoothly than some automatics.


User currently offlineDarksnowynight From United States of America, joined Jan 2012, 1365 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2775 times:

Quoting Fabo (Reply 13):

Technically, Cost Index does not kick in until after 10K ft, in (unrestriced) climb mode. But I understand what you mean (lets say a maximum derate takeoff).

Oh, I know. I wasn't being so literal, but I'm glad someone got that.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 13):

And no, dont do that. Personally, I would not even cruise in top gear at 30 (although some people advocate it...), let alone accelerate.

Not something I'd do a lot.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 14):

Low-rpm, high-gear acceleration is perfectly fine in a naturally-aspirated car. You certainly don't want to do it in a turbocharged or supercharged car, though...

It does so happen I'm NA here, yes. But I'm curious now. I thought laboring an engine was always bad. You're saying it's not unless you've got forced air induction?



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User currently onlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1839 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2742 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 12):
Still haven't really mastered getting the vehicle going from a standstill when I'm on a hill..

If the hill is really steep, the easiest way is using the handbrake.

Keep the handbrake on, put 1st gear and slowly pull the clutch and press accel until you feel it starts to power the wheels. Keep it that way (it won't stall unless you're pressing too much), release the handbrake and you're on. It's easier on the clutch as well, as it doesn't have to pull the weight of the car going downhill.

A lot of manuals now have hill assist, though.


User currently offlineB747-4U3 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2002, 990 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2743 times:

Quoting af773atmsp (Thread starter):
The manager was even kind enough to let me practice in a Volkswagen GTI with a manual transmission thats on the used car sale lot. Now I have been pretty much teaching myself how to drive manual, and the GTI is actually pretty easy to drive.

I learnt to drive in a Golf 1.9 Diesel and it was easy to drive and had a brilliant clutch. I'd driven manual motorbikes before and I found the transition to a Golf was really easy.

I then bought a Chrysler Crossfire (3.2 litre, V6) which was a completely different story. The clutch pedal is quite springy so it is very easy to let it out a bit too fast and stall, or worse let it out a bit too fast with your other foot on the gas pedal and fly off...and with an engine that size it really does fly (although the sound the engine makes is superb).

I think it is just a case of getting used to it. Indeed, I got in someone else's automatic the other day and spent a few seconds fumbling around with my foot trying to find the clutch pedal before it dawned on me that automatics don't have them. Then every time I came up to a red light I was pushing down expecting to find the clutch to change down.

Once you get used to a manual you might find that you prefer it. Mine is a nuisance to drive around town because you have to apply so much pressure on the clutch pedal (unlike a Golf), so changing gears constantly is tiring. But once I'm out on the open road there really is nothing that can beat a manual. It gives you a lot more control over the power and you can use the gears for faster acceleration, helping you to slow or just to create a nice noise from the engine.


User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3307 posts, RR: 13
Reply 24, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2777 times:
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Quoting Darksnowynight (Reply 21):
It does so happen I'm NA here, yes. But I'm curious now. I thought laboring an engine was always bad. You're saying it's not unless you've got forced air induction?

It's not that it's not bad. It can, of course, cause severe problems if you do it all the time. It's the equivalent of running an engine without oil, so you can have damage to the crankshaft, cams, and cylinders from repeated wear and grinding since oil isn't pressurized and lubricating. But high-load at low-RPM in a NA engine won't risk spontaneous destruction like it will in a forced induction car (bent rods, shattered cylinders, torn up manifolds, destroyed turbos, etc).

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
25 vikkyvik : I doubt we have the same clutch, based on this: I find the Mazda clutch to require about the same force as my Civic clutch did, but it has a slightly
26 af773atmsp : Is there anyway of knowing when you're ready to drive a stick shift on public roads? Sometimes I feel like I'm ready, but other times I feel I need mo
27 vikkyvik : Whenever you're reasonably comfortable. Basically, if something goes wrong, you don't want to freak out. So if you're at a stop sign, and when it's y
28 NAV20 : af773atmsp, one thing that no-one seems to have mentioned yet - and that is that 'letting the clutch in' is very much a two-stage process. The clutch
29 ImperialEagle : We had a funeral yesterday for a gentleman who had a vintage car collection. The immediate family showed up in a 1941 Packard 120. The car was in imma
30 FI642 : I've been driving a "manny tranny" for a long time. The easiest? Toyota. Most difficult? Honda. Once you get the knack of it, you'll be fine, and reme
31 Post contains images TLG : Control of what? 5. Or drive an automatic and not worry about all this!
32 Post contains images vikkyvik : Allow me to state the obvious answer: Shifting gears.
33 Post contains images TLG : How could I miss something so clear?
34 Geezer : First car I ever drove was a 1935 Graham.........in about 1945; ( I was all of 13 yrs old at the time ) You have that about half right ! Yeah, there A
35 vikkyvik : While that's true when starting from a stop, that's the only place it holds. The rest of the time, it's not strictly about flywheel speed; it's about
36 Dreadnought : In the case of a rear-wheel drive car, a manual gives you the best possible control of the car's dynamics. There is a very good reason why the vast m
37 TLG : True, but the normal daily drive never encounters the same conditions. My family vehicle will neither spin nor skid; improve on that please! I realiz
38 Geezer : quote=TLG,reply=37]My family vehicle will neither spin nor skid; improve on that please![/quote] That's a very interesting statement.......a vehicle t
39 zippyjet : Originally I was taught by my cousin when I just got my liscense 40 years ago when I turned 16. Scott (my cousin) had one of those 2 door early 70's V
40 Post contains images Dreadnought : You'd be surprised. Even here in Atlanta - hardly considered a mountainous area - there are some places where you encounter steep hills and sweeping
41 vikkyvik : Never? I know you don't need clutches in trucks with unsynchronized/non-constant-mesh transmissions, and I know a lot of truck drivers float the gear
42 TLG : Correct, never. Traction control & ABS anyone? Good job on the math Geezer! Much of my experience came the same way you got yours; I used to be a
43 JJJ : Sorry but having driven all kinds of manuals, double-clutches and regular automatics that's absolutely non-true. With a manual you can control just h
44 Kaphias : Shall I send some snow your way?
45 TLG : Certainly, I've driven many thousands of miles on snow covered roads! Google "traction control" and "ABS" to find out what they are.
46 Geezer : Please understand........I am NOT advocating driving ANY vehicle without the clutch; I was merely pointing out that.......if you are VERY familiar wi
47 ANITIX87 : Oh my God you love quotation marks...re-read your post doing "air-quotes" with your fingers each time you use them. You'll see how "excessive" it is
48 Kaphias : I know what they both are, thanks, and I also know that neither will always stop a car from spinning and/or skidding. Almost always, sure, but not al
49 af773atmsp : Although I'm still not quite ready for the roads just yet, I did reach another milestone in my manual driving. Now I'm able to drive manuals through t
50 Post contains images vikkyvik : I understand, and I'm aware. Come on Charley, you completely ignored the first half of my sentence: Clutchless shifting in a synchronized/synchromesh
51 Geezer : vikkyvik......... After carefully re-reading the preceding paragraph, I don't think we have any disagreement; I think you are referring to manual tra
52 FrankAMS : They say the best anti-theft deterrent in the States for a car is buying a manual. I would hazard a guess that 90% of Americans can't drive a manual,
53 Darksnowynight : Oddly enough, that never happens to me. I have an MT for a personal vehicle, but almost all the company vehicles I use (often on a daily basis), are
54 ANITIX87 : Charley, I didn't mean for you to be insulted. There's no correct or incorrect use of emphasis, I'd just never seen it done with quotation marks (I'm
55 Post contains images Kaphias : You're not the only one. I've tried it a few times when I'm bored and always end up looking like an idiot. I don't know why it's so difficult; as you
56 ANITIX87 : Same here. I damn-near break my nose every time I try it. I'm blown away by how difficult it is to do. One time I drove my dad's automatic Accord aft
57 vikkyvik : The clutch also has a much larger travel and more force required than a typical brake pedal. So even though you have to be fairly precise, I wouldn't
58 Post contains links TLG : You are both correct, and I should've worded it differently. I fully realize it's possible for a vehicle to spin or skid even with Traction Control &
59 Post contains images NAV20 : af773atmsp, following my principle of (as briefly as possible) giving you advice that may help, a couple more things:- Starting off a manual-gearbox
60 vikkyvik : Really? I know that was the case in the past, but all manuals I've driven have a meshed 1st gear. For unmeshed 1st gear, I suppose the reasoning is l
61 Geezer : As long as we're talking about manual transmissions and trucks, I'll pass on this sad story from my early trucking days; Years before I started haulin
62 vikkyvik : That is a tragic story. Though the cynic in me has to point out that if he had been floating the gears, he probably never would have gotten it into f
63 Fabo : Yeah well, remind me of that when you kill yourself going 50 into that snowed up corner, because ESP will take care of that. You will not be first an
64 Post contains images planewasted : I do it quite often, it's a good way to have fun in a FWD car without using the handbrake. Push the accelerator at the same time as you brake with yo
65 Kaphias : If first gear on my 2000 Subaru Legacy is meshed, it takes FOREVER to do it. I ran into that problem soon after I got the car and was learning to dri
66 YXD172 : I'm pretty sure that a big part of it is also where the sensitive range of motion is. Most clutches that I've used are very sensitive when they are c
67 TLG : I know what you mean! I used to do it all the time when I drove truck. Since the accelerator is necessary to downshift, it's not really possible to b
68 Geezer : TLG; Here we go again ! What kind of a truck / transmission are you talking about that you have to "double-clutch" (depress the clutch pedal twice) i
69 vikkyvik : Fair enough. If I'm below 10 mph or so, I can shift into 1st with no problem. I don't do it much at all, but it's possible. Both good points! Simple
70 Post contains images AM744 : Learned from a young age in VWs. No bad experiences at all. They are simpler, require less maintenance and old clunky cars can be jumpstarted by push
71 jamincan : I learned on a '96 Honda Accord and have driven manual exclusively since then except the odd time where I've driven someone else's car. Practiced a fe
72 rlwynn : We had a rental car in America with an automatic. I would keep trying to push in the clutch and hit the big brake pedal instead. My family would tell
73 Post contains images Dreadnought : That reminds me of the first time I drove in the UK. It was a manual. For the first time I was driving from the right seat, and the gearshift is in m
74 af773atmsp : Basic manual driving question: If I'm in a higher gear (lets say 3rd or 4th gear) and I'm approaching a stop and need to slow down, do I have to down
75 Kaphias : I think you'll find that everyone does it a little differently. For me, as soon as I know I'm stopping I either pull it into neutral if there's no lo
76 Dreadnought : Whichever way you like. Shift down if you want to use engine braking, but otherwise, just push in the clutch once you've slowed down to under 800-100
77 TLG : That's about right, although downshifting is normally not recommended because of the extra wear & tear on the clutch. Brakes are much easier &
78 mad99 : This was common for cars built before 1970, especially British cars. One of the guys from the office had to travel to the us and had the same problem
79 moo : In the UK, engine braking and downshifting during braking are both taught during driver learning - the only situation where I was told not to downshi
80 Darksnowynight : Yup. My car was certainly not designed with enthusiasts in mind. But it does feel a lot more "fun" to drive around the hills and twisties of my neigh
81 JJJ : It depends on your driving habits. City driving puts a lot of wear on clutches, and you'll see most manual taxis having the clutch replaced preventiv
82 Post contains images moo : Definitely - if my 1998 Landrover did it, then so will your 2010 vehicle Quite often you will find yourself replacing the clutch not because of the w
83 Darksnowynight : Sounds reasonable enough. I try to keep my shifting to an average of about 2 shifts per mile (I can get away with that living in Southern California,
84 Fabo : Yep, pretty much every fuel-injected car does that.
85 af773atmsp : Well I drove a manual shift car on public roads for the first time. There were a couple times when I thought I was driving an automatic and the RPMs s
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