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CFL Vs LED Advice  
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

My old thread on the subject is locked/archived, so I'll start a new one.

We just bought a new home. All the lights are incandescent and that has to change immediately. I don't need to rack up those kids of electricity bills.

Now, I'm well aware of the disadvantages to CFL's. Breakable, mercury, less efficient, warm-up time, dimming works poorly.

BUT... before I sink $1,300 into LED lighting that will last me until I'm 50, I want to make a careful decision. It seems to me as if LED lighting technology is rapidly maturing. The new Philips L-prize LED has a CRI of 90 at 2700K and uses 10W for 900 lumens (60W incandescent equivalent). It comes in one power (10W/900 lumen) and the other bulbs of other powers are CRI of 80.

But Philips already has introduced into some markets the "DimTone" LED. This LED is fully dimmable and changes the color temperature as it is dimmed to a richer, warmer light just like an incandescent. If the L-Prize 10W is out, when will that technology be combined with DimTone?

See what I mean? I'm hesitant to buy LED's because I'm worried that they will quickly go obsolete. I'm tempted to wait a few years until the ones with features I like become available.

What are your thoughts?

[Edited 2012-11-20 00:29:09]

54 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinefrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3712 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

I know I'd wait.

And I think there's no guarantee that LEDs that you buy today will last you forever either.
LEDs themselves suffer almost no wear, but heat dissipation is their major issue. LEDs are more efficient but actually produce more heat than an equivalent incandescent. The higher the power rating, the better the heat dissipation system must be to ensure a long lasting bulb...

I'm guessing that integrating LED spots in enclosed areas like false ceilings or the like where there is little ventilation is still relatively challenging...

Here's a good article from a good website on the subject:

http://www.ledsmagazine.com/features/2/5/8



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 2, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

It occurs to me that a lot of the fixtures in the house are closed, so I guess we'll get stuck with CFL's for a little while, anyway.

User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2048 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

I too wouldn't invest a lot of money in LED lighting at the moment. I'd replace the incandescents that are used the most with high-quality CFLs with a warm color range. Those really are okay, not perfect but very usable. Then in a few years buy LEDs when the market has stabilized.


Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting francoflier (Reply 1):
LEDs themselves suffer almost no wear, but heat dissipation is their major issue.

That's not true LED's dim over time, you can already see it in instilations where a LED has failed and been replaced, the new one will be brighter than the older ones.

Personally I'd wait a while and wait for the prices for LEDs to drop as the technology maturers. What I would do is replace the incandescents with something like the Osram Halolux energy saver lamps, they give the same kind of like as incandescent, are cheaper to run and have amuch longer life, they are also significantly cheaper to buy than good quality CFL's. 60w is reduced to 42w, yet the output is the same and energy consumption reduced with a longer lifetime.

Quoting francoflier (Reply 1):
I'm guessing that integrating LED spots in enclosed areas like false ceilings or the like where there is little ventilation is still relatively challenging...

The new OSRAM LED's are specifically designed for this kind of instillation, so long as they are installed within a box it's not a problem.


User currently offlineswissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

We have made the switch 3 years ago.... have maybe 3 or 4 CFL's left in the house just because there is nothing available on the LED side. Most of these LED's are in the "daylight" range. No regrets so far and non of them had to be replaced and they works just fine in our cold winters in Canada   They all do loose brightness over time.... I do not pay attention to the watts, lumens is what I look for and compare between all these bulbs. Majority are made by Lights of America...

Cheerios,


User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6056 posts, RR: 29
Reply 6, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2552 times:
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Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 4):
That's not true LED's dim over time, you can already see it in instilations where a LED has failed and been replaced

They sure do. My dad sells and services railroad signal equipment and has been selling and servicing LEDs for 11 years and he tells me they do wear out over time. Railroads like them because they are bright, use less energy and last longer than traditional lamps, but they will not last foreever.

LEDs can also have issues with the circuitry that makes it works. The LEDs may be in perfect shape, but a failed circuit still means a failure.

I would also go with the CFLs until the LED technology gets cheaper. CFLs aren't the best, but I made the switch 8 years ago when they were fairly pricey and I have only replaced two inside the house. I have replaced the ones in my porch lights about once a year, I guess they can't take the Michigan winter more than once.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 7, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
All the lights are incandescent and that has to change immediately.


Hang on to them for now. You can install dimmer switches for the moment and turn down the lighting when you don't need that much light.

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
I'm well aware of the disadvantages to CFL's. Breakable, mercury, less efficient, warm-up time, dimming works poorly.


....and may hurt your dog if they break.
Remember what Congressman Ted Poe said;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv59PJ30WeM

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
I'm hesitant to buy LED's because I'm worried that they will quickly go obsolete. I'm tempted to wait a few years until the ones with features I like become available.



Wait a while before something else comes along. The charming vintage Victorian you recently bought really shines and brings out the fine details of your walls, boarders, arches and other ornate details found in home of this era with traditional incandescent light bulbs. You don't want to put in cheap factory lighting (CFLs) in your new home.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5327 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

I've put a couple of LED lights in the kitchen (we also just bought a house, and strange how bulbs seem to be burning out), replacing incandescent. Both the wife and I commented that the light was 'different' We bought Bright White with a 75 watts equivalent.

We're hesitant to experiment with Daylight and Softwhite, due to the cost of experimentation.

I replaced a couple of basement bulbs that are on dimmers with a dimmable LED and they seem to work OK. Those bulb sit right next to incandescents and, except at the dimmest setting, I really can't tell the difference.

We will probably just replace bulbs on an attrition basis.

I will assure you of one thing...CFL's are coming out of this house. The light is just too harsh and the warm-up time (though getting better) is annoying. Three or 4 years ago, I swapped the whole house over to CFL and that was a mistake.

Quoting Superfly (Reply 7):
The charming vintage Victorian you recently bought really shines and brings out the fine details of your walls, boarders, arches and other ornate details found in home of this era with traditional incandescent light bulbs.

I think it would look much better by gaslight.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 2):
It occurs to me that a lot of the fixtures in the house are closed, so I guess we'll get stuck with CFL's for a little while, anyway.

Doc, what do you mean by closed? I haven't found a fixture that won't accept an LED. In fact, I have found that the LED's are closer to mimicking the shape and size of a comparable incandescent than some CFL's are.

[Edited 2012-11-20 08:43:59]


When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3521 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
We just bought a new home. All the lights are incandescent and that has to change immediately. I don't need to rack up those kids of electricity bills.

Incandescent lights are not the huge drain if you turn them off when not in use.

I heard about new 3M bulbs this weekend. They believe they have solved the heat problem by surrounding the led with a cooling liquid. Passively cooled allowing for smaller size bulbs. Fully dimmable. Supposedly Walmart will be carrying them but I could not find them online.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 7):
Hang on to them for now. You can install dimmer switches for the moment and turn down the lighting when you don't need that much light.

Dimmer switches are already installed. I can use dimmable CFL's or dimmable LED's.

Quoting Superfly (Reply 7):
Wait a while before something else comes along. The charming vintage Victorian you recently bought really shines and brings out the fine details of your walls, boarders, arches and other ornate details found in home of this era with traditional incandescent light bulbs. You don't want to put in cheap factory lighting (CFLs) in your new home.

I think you're used to the CFL's that have the 5000-6000K color temperature. That color of light is horrible and is exactly like cheap factory lighting.

Proper domestic CFL's have a 2700K color temperature and a good CRI. The light quality is indistinguishable from those of an incandescent to the human eye. I'm more concerned about the environmental impact both in the home (if one breaks when it is warm) and also globally (mercury).

Quoting mham001 (Reply 9):
I heard about new 3M bulbs this weekend. They believe they have solved the heat problem by surrounding the led with a cooling liquid. Passively cooled allowing for smaller size bulbs. Fully dimmable. Supposedly Walmart will be carrying them but I could not find them online.

I've heard about these and the DimTones and it just appears as if they aren't yet available.

For now, I am putting LED's in all open fixtures around the house and I will put dimmable CFL's in the closed fixtures. The closed fixtures (and for that matter the open fixtures) are all completely fugly and eventually (when I have some of that green stuff around), I'd like to replace them with something a bit less "grandma."

[Edited 2012-11-20 11:07:47]

User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 11, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
I think it would look much better by gaslight.


True but then there is the fire hazard - the dog might knock it over or an earthquake and then his investment is up in smoke.
That wouldn't be good.  
Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):
I think you're used to the CFL's that have the 5000-6000K color temperature. That color of light is horrible and is exactly like cheap factory lighting.

Proper domestic CFL's have a 2700K color temperature and a good CRI.



I haven't bothered to check. As long as incandescents are on the market, I'll continue to buy them.

Have you considered lava lamps and other inexpensive mood lighting?



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 12, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 11):
I haven't bothered to check. As long as incandescents are on the market, I'll continue to buy them.

Most of the lighting in our rental house right now is CFL (that I put in). They've more than paid for themselves. The big problem with CFL's as far as light is concerned is the warm-up time. When you turn them on, they come on at less than 30% brightness and then require anywhere from 1-10 minutes to warm up completely.

However, once they are on, they look like incandescents if you can't see the bulb itself.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 13, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 12):
However, once they are on, they look like incandescents if you can't see the bulb itself.

I'm a bulb-snob   



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 10):

Dimmer switches are already installed. I can use dimmable CFL's or dimmable LED's.

Hate to burst your bubble Doc but not all dimmer switches will work with all dimmable LEDS, there's both analogue and digital dimming, they are not interchangeable.


User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3521 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 14):
Hate to burst your bubble Doc but not all dimmer switches will work with all dimmable LEDS, there's both analogue and digital dimming, they are not interchangeable.

Good point. Many dimmers cannot deal with the low wattage of leds.


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8369 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

CFL has been a failure until MAYBE now.

LED is most likely a failure at this very moment -- bad quality, bad light, production defects and too expensive.

CFLs last a very long time if you never turn them off. This strikes me as an irrelevant and misleading fact. They do die, and regularly.

I use CFLs for the majority of my lighting. i like Cool color temps, not sickly yellowish "warm" lights. GE Reveal is a bit too reddish for me, but it gets close. The goal is something similar to daylight. At least some of us enjoy that.


User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5327 posts, RR: 14
Reply 17, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):
This strikes me as an irrelevant and misleading fact. They do die, and regularly.

I agree. It seems I was changing CFL bulbs more than I expected. I seemed to always be localized around a coiple of fixtures, though. I cleaned the contacts and checked the voltage at the bases, but still 3 or 4 fixtures kept burning those CFL's out.   



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2048 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 17):
I agree. It seems I was changing CFL bulbs more than I expected. I seemed to always be localized around a coiple of fixtures, though. I cleaned the contacts and checked the voltage at the bases, but still 3 or 4 fixtures kept burning those CFL's out.   

That's strange, I've been using CFL's for 10 years now and I still have to have a single one die on me. Quite unlike incandescents which you have to replace rather often. The CFL's do lose their full power though. I already replaced one or two because they don't go to full brightness anymore.



Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2553 times:

I actually just bit the bullet and bought a bunch of LEDs. I'm leasing an apartment and just renewed the lease for a year, and fully plan on taking these with me when I move. Yes, I did box up all the old incandescent lights to put them back in the fixtures. 

One of the luxuries of being a young, single guy making way too much money is I can start silly projects and have fun. I have started automating my apartment, and have built my own electronics to do that, and all the control mechanisms using computers, I have programmed and built myself.

The next step was to get controllable lighting. I did not want to play around with solid state relays in light switches, so I bit the bullet and bought some LEDs that Philips makes. They only sell them at Apple stores.

http://www.meethue.com/en-US

They aren't cheap: http://store.apple.com/us/product/HA...ps-hue-connected-bulb-starter-pack
And additional bulbs are $60.

They're fun because I can dim them, turn them into any color I want, and adjust the warmth all from my iPhone/iPad/Android. I have also written a custom application so I can control them over a HTTP call... and can then control them over a webpage or a phone prompt.

As for the LEDs themselves, they are bright and well-built. I think the light is just as good as incandescent bulbs - I never liked the CFLs.



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 20, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2548 times:

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 19):
They're fun because I can dim them, turn them into any color I want, and adjust the warmth all from my iPhone/iPad/Android. I have also written a custom application so I can control them over a HTTP call... and can then control them over a webpage or a phone prompt.

The question is how good the CRI is. If the bulb is based on just RGB, then the CRI will be poor.


User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2531 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 20):
The question is how good the CRI is. If the bulb is based on just RGB, then the CRI will be poor.

The LEDs inside are not RGB - they are closer to orange, lime-green, and violet. Right now I have them in about half the sockets around the apartment, and the other half are incandescent. I have set the warmth of the LEDs such that they are truly indistinguishable from the incandescent bulbs.

I do have some knock-off LED accent lights as well, which are RGB. I was unhappy with those, as the light was always bright white. The two schemes are definitely different, with different color productions possible with each. The Philips LEDs are more "pastel" - that's the best word I can come up with.



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 22, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2528 times:

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 21):
The LEDs inside are not RGB - they are closer to orange, lime-green, and violet.

Even still, that's going to hit the CRI. Colors that absorb and reflect frequencies between those emitted frequencies will appear very dull.


User currently offlinesccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5484 posts, RR: 28
Reply 23, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2500 times:

If you are counting on changing out bulbs to "save money," you must leave a lot of lights on a lot of the time!

I have replaced most lights that I use a lot with CFLs, and I know that they use a lot less power (and emit less heat, which in Texas in the summer is a good thing). Nonetheless, I have also found that CFLs fail more frequently than we are told to expect - I have come around to the habit of coding the date of installation to track this; very disappointing.

Also (and this is something we hear little of), CFLs will occasionally fail "noisy" - the electronic circuitry making a huge amount of electrical noise (they are transmitting RF, over the home's wiring). It interferes with radios and remote-control devices. Big pain to troubleshoot the first time I encountered it.

I have great hopes for LED lights, but the cost is just stupid right now, and having watched the price curve, I am confident that they will make a lot more sense economically in a couple of years.



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 24, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2477 times:

Quoting sccutler (Reply 23):

If you are counting on changing out bulbs to "save money," you must leave a lot of lights on a lot of the time!

Well, you save money on a light that lasts 15 years and burns little energy in a setting where energy is expensive.

Quoting sccutler (Reply 23):
Nonetheless, I have also found that CFLs fail more frequently than we are told to expect - I have come around to the habit of coding the date of installation to track this; very disappointing.

There are a number of factors that affect CFL lifetime and one of them is frequency of on/off. Every time you turn a CFL on and off, you shorten its lifespan, much as for an incandescent. For this reason, CFL's are good for lights that will be cycled infrequently and left on for a long time.

I use incandescents for closets and other such spaces where the light will only ever be on for a few seconds at a time. In such a setting, a CFL will age quickly and require "warming up" to get to full brightness and an LED is simply not cost-effective.

I use LED's for open fixtures. They have all of the benefits of CFL's (even better efficiency), last 10-20 years, start instantly, and don't care how often they're turned on and off. Also, most LED bulbs today are dimmable, although the color temperature starts to look odd once they are very dim.

I use CFL's for closed fixtures because LED's currently handle closed fixtures. Fortunately, in my home, most of the closed fixtures are in side rooms (the office, the bedrooms) where they would likely not be turned on and off frequently and will be left on for a long time.

But each technology has its niche.


User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 25, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2473 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 24):
and don't care how often they're turned on and off.

They do care, same with most electronics, the number of cycles effects them.


User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6056 posts, RR: 29
Reply 26, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2470 times:
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Quoting Rara (Reply 18):
That's strange, I've been using CFL's for 10 years now and I still have to have a single one die on me

I have had them for 7 or 8 years now and I have only replaced two inside the house. The outdoors ones don't last as long, but neither did standard bulbs.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineswissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 27, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2487 times:

We did a bigger scale test with my wifes poultry barns.... 400 bulbs  , the worst ones are the CFL's by far, lighting is controlled by computers, we averaged changing 8-15 bulbs every 9 weeks, dimming was bad towards the lower end, CRI was @87 and was fine, color was at 2700K... not so good for poultry.

Now we are in our 3rd year with LED's and we have changed so far 8 bulbs!! and we are using 10w per bulb on average, CFL's was 15w... These barns are washed after each flock of birds are gone, if its -20 during empty time barn is that cold too, no issues to fire them up or flicker....

Would stay away from the high priced LED's for now and try it out with some more reasonable priced LED's and see  

Cheerios,


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 28, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2455 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 25):
They do care, same with most electronics, the number of cycles effects them.

Not the diode itself. In fact, LED's last longer when cycled. The underlying solid-state electronics may degrade, but much slower than the diode will.

The fact that diodes may be switched on and off very quickly (on MHz frequencies even) is one reason why they get used in displays and as pumps for pulsed lasers.


User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 29, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2450 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 28):

Not the diode itself. In fact, LED's last longer when cycled.

You have to consider the diode and the electronics behind it as one in the same, you can't replace the diode when the circuit board dies. I have no idea where you get LED's last longer when cycled from, I've been selling light for nearly 6 years and have never heard that.


User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3521 posts, RR: 3
Reply 30, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2434 times:

Quoting swissy (Reply 27):
Quoting DocLightning (Reply 28):
The underlying solid-state electronics may degrade, but much slower than the diode will.

Not even close. Resistors and whatnot can fail for a number of reasons, in fact the big problem leds have is the circuit board getting too hot and that is often what is failing because where does the heat rise? Electronics can even go bad from long periods of disuse.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 31, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2426 times:

DocLightning:
Have you considered halogen lights?
They may not be as efficient as the CFLs but more efficient than incandescent yet still dimmable and can be romantic.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineMarcus From Mexico, joined Apr 2001, 1775 posts, RR: 2
Reply 32, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2426 times:

These look good...don't know about prices but since these are sold in Apple stores they will not be cheap...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoQj08SluXo



Kids!....we are going to the happiest place on earth...TIJUANA! signed: Krusty the Clown
User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 33, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2425 times:

Quoting Marcus (Reply 32):
These look good...don't know about prices but since these are sold in Apple stores they will not be cheap...
Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 19):
bought some LEDs that Philips makes. They only sell them at Apple stores.

 



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8369 posts, RR: 3
Reply 34, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2398 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 31):
Have you considered halogen lights?

  

When going for a premium clean look, halogen is perfected technology.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 35, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 2380 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 31):

DocLightning:
Have you considered halogen lights?
They may not be as efficient as the CFLs but more efficient than incandescent yet still dimmable and can be romantic.

Can't use halogens in closed fixtures. Also, halogens still radiate the vast majority of their energy as heat and, while they save about 10-20% on energy over a standard incandescent, they still use a lot of power.

Quoting mham001 (Reply 30):
Not even close. Resistors and whatnot can fail for a number of reasons, in fact the big problem leds have is the circuit board getting too hot and that is often what is failing because where does the heat rise? Electronics can even go bad from long periods of disuse.

Again, LED's do not age based on being turned on and off. In fact, some commercial LED's actually flicker at about 100Hz during normal operation.

One major use of LED is in displays where they are rapidly cycled on and off. The diode itself does not decay with this use. The electronics in a well-designed LED bulb are designed to operate under the normal conditions for which the bulb is designed. They only generate heat when powered, so if they are turned on and off ten or fifteen times per day, their lifespan is not affected. In fact, LED's are excellent for motion-sensing floodlights, which may turn on and off twenty times during a night.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12270 posts, RR: 25
Reply 36, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 2364 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
I will assure you of one thing...CFL's are coming out of this house. The light is just too harsh and the warm-up time (though getting better) is annoying. Three or 4 years ago, I swapped the whole house over to CFL and that was a mistake.

I've avoided CFLs because of the warm-up factor.

Also the early ones had transformers in them that would hum, which would drive me nuts.

I've still got lots of ol' fashioned incandescents here.

I am pretty careful about how long I leave lights on.

I tend to leave the plasma TV on longer than I should, but like the incandescent, the follow-ons aren't as good and I see no reason to replace it.

Quoting Superfly (Reply 11):
Have you considered lava lamps and other inexpensive mood lighting?

Now that's what I need!   

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 19):
One of the luxuries of being a young, single guy making way too much money is I can start silly projects and have fun. I have started automating my apartment, and have built my own electronics to do that, and all the control mechanisms using computers, I have programmed and built myself.

I used to do such things when I was young, but now I get all the jollies I need from my day job.

I tend to have larger silly thoughts these days, converging on the new Tesla model.

Think of it as a big light bulb!

I think I have a few years before I'd need to pull the trigger on that, though.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinesccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5484 posts, RR: 28
Reply 37, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 2339 times:

Looks like our approach to lighting is consistent, Doc. Good analysis.


...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 38, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks ago) and read 2328 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
Doc, what do you mean by closed? I haven't found a fixture that won't accept an LED. In fact, I have found that the LED's are closer to mimicking the shape and size of a comparable incandescent than some CFL's are.

A "closed" fixture is a fixture that is not open to the air.


An "open fixture" is open to the air.


This is important because LED's generate a fair amount of heat. LED's do not perform well in a hot environment and suffer degradation both in light output and lifetime. They require open fixtures that allow air to circulate so that heat can be removed. Many LED bulbs come with radiator fins as part of the bulb assembly.



If air cannot circulate freely in and out of the fixture the bulb will overheat.

CFL's can tolerate a warmer operating environment than an LED and also do not generate quite as much heat, so they are compatible with closed fixtures.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
CFL's are coming out of this house. The light is just too harsh

I keep hearing this about CFL's (and LED's) and the problem is that you are buying CFL's that are "daylight" or "bright white."

You want to buy "Warm White" or "Soft White" bulbs. They should list a color temperature between 2700K and 3000K. This is a pleasing, yellowish color that is visually indistinguishable from an incandescent when the bulb is hidden behind a baffle.

2700K-3000K is appropriate for relaxing settings, like home. This is probably because this is similar to the quality of daylight at sunset. By contrast, 5000K-6000K is a harsher, bluer light that is appropriate for work settings, which is probably because this color temperature is similar to the quality of daylight at mid-day.


User currently offlinezippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5467 posts, RR: 13
Reply 39, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks ago) and read 2324 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):

What are your thoughts?



Since they are an investment, start gradually. I can vouch for outdoor LED floods I purchased within the past six weeks. I use them on my patio. This fixture is an photocell on at dusk, off at dawn unit. These canno't handle CFL's but, I wanted bright economical lighting. So I invested in two of them. Cost me about $60 give or take. I'm very happy with them. So my advice is switch to LED's for say flood lights, maybe outside like myself or if you have a hard to reach ceiling light go LED for that one. Rapidly, there are more choices and prices are starting to come down a bit. And my LED's which I bought at Home Depot were bright light and on sale. They look like regular flood lights, not those funny "ET" looking earlier LED's.



I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 40, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2318 times:

Quoting Flighty (Reply 34):
When going for a premium clean look, halogen is perfected technology.


  
My condo has both halogen and incandescent bulbs.
All of the halogen and some of the incandescent bulbs are on dimmers switches.
Looks great at night with the halogens dim and looking out over the Bangkok skyline.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 36):
I tend to leave the plasma TV on longer than I should


I still use a CRT for TV and computer monitor.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 36):
Now that's what I need!


Yes!
...and they use a single energy efficient 40watt incandescent bulb.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 38):
This is a pleasing, yellowish color that is visually indistinguishable from an incandescent when the bulb is hidden behind a baffle.



That's not true. Hiding a CFL behind a fancy light fixture is like putting lipstick on a pig. It still has that depressing, dim light look.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 41, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2312 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 35):
Can't use halogens in closed fixtures.

Jesus Doc where the hell do you get this kinda rubbish information. This kind of halogen you can use in any fixture open or closed. Osram Halolux Classic Energy Saver.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 35):
Again, LED's do not age based on being turned on and off.

No but the controlling electronics do, you see the diode you're forgetting that the diode by itself is useless, the diode and the controlling electronics need to be treated as a single unit.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12270 posts, RR: 25
Reply 42, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2272 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 41):
No but the controlling electronics do, you see the diode you're forgetting that the diode by itself is useless, the diode and the controlling electronics need to be treated as a single unit.

I'm really surprised the controlling electronics would degrade with switching. Use of solid state electronics in switching applications is as old as the hills, at power levels waaaay above what we're talking here.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 43, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2263 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 41):
Jesus Doc where the hell do you get this kinda rubbish information. This kind of halogen you can use in any fixture open or closed. Osram Halolux Classic Energy Saver.

Oh. I've never see those before. Cool!

Quoting Superfly (Reply 40):
That's not true. Hiding a CFL behind a fancy light fixture is like putting lipstick on a pig. It still has that depressing, dim light look.

I've done side-by-side comparisons with doubters like you and they've been shocked.


User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7035 posts, RR: 3
Reply 44, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2259 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 43):

Oh. I've never see those before. Cool!

Standard 60w is replaced by a 42w, lights have a design life of 3000 hours and are cheaper than quality CFL's.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 45, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2255 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 43):
I've done side-by-side comparisons with doubters like you and they've been shocked.

Did you stick their wet finger in the socket?  



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3521 posts, RR: 3
Reply 46, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 2220 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 42):
I'm really surprised the controlling electronics would degrade with switching. Use of solid state electronics in switching applications is as old as the hills, at power levels waaaay above what we're talking here.

But are those switches sitting next to the hot led going through heat cycles? A flashing led would only be half hot and might explain where he heard they last longer. It probably really depends on the length of cycle and ultimate temperatures but circuits do not like heat cycling.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 47, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 2199 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 45):
Did you stick their wet finger in the socket?  


 
Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 44):
Standard 60w is replaced by a 42w, lights have a design life of 3000 hours and are cheaper than quality CFL's.

Still not doing it for me. I can cut it to 12-14W with a design life of 5-7000 hours and negligible radiated heat. There are about 20 bulbs in the house that will be replaced with CFL alone. That's 600W right there if you assume 30W savings per bulb. When you add in the other 15 or so that are LED that burn similar wattage to a CFL, that's now 1.2kW.

While a 25% savings is nice, an 80% savings is better.

Liquid-cooled LED's will be on the market in the next few years. Around the time that my CFL's start to wear out, I'll be ready to replace those in the closed fixtures with these. Alternatively, I may choose to replace my closed fixtures with track lighting or something else. Those fixtures are ugly.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 48, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 2197 times:

Quoting mham001 (Reply 46):
But are those switches sitting next to the hot led going through heat cycles? A flashing led would only be half hot and might explain where he heard they last longer. It probably really depends on the length of cycle and ultimate temperatures but circuits do not like heat cycling.

That's part of it. It takes a while for an LED to reach full heat. Usually a half hour on or so.

Here is an example of rapid LED cycling. It's called the Cubitron and it is a featured Burning Man art exhibit every year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnjdYQzm68s

(Warning, some profanity in the background comments).


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 49, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2178 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 48):
Here is an example of rapid LED cycling. It's called the Cubitron and it is a featured Burning Man art exhibit every year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnjdYQzm68s

(Warning, some profanity in the background comments).

That is amazing and would look even more trippy if you're on something.....



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 50, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2124 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 49):
That is amazing and would look even more trippy if you're on something.....

I'm sure nobody at Burning Man does drugs.

And even on the off chance they did, they would not stand around the Cubitron grinning and laughing like happy idiots.

*deadpan*

Update on the lighting situation: wouldn't you know it, the hanging fixtures won't accept an A19 LED bulb? They take an A19 incandescent but the slightly different contour of the LED bulb won't allow the glass dome to screw on all the way.

Well, I thought the fixtures were fugly anyway, and there are only three of them. So we'll be replacing them. I'm about to learn how to replace a ceiling lamp! How exciting!


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39659 posts, RR: 75
Reply 51, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2119 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 50):
I'm sure nobody at Burning Man does drugs.

Well of course not. It's against the law...

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 50):
screw on all the way.

How exciting!

Oh boy.   



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19275 posts, RR: 58
Reply 52, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2080 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 51):
Oh boy.   

Jeebus. The man is as bad as I am!  
Quoting Superfly (Reply 51):
Well of course not. It's against the law...

I'm glad you understand. We're all very law-abiding. After all, I am an upright, respec(koff!)able, ups(hack!)tanding, ionnoce(haaaaarch!!!)...

Sorry, I couldn't quite get that sentence out.  

In all truth, if you're ever in a bind, you want to run across Burners (Burning Man people). We're not upright or clean-cut, but we're good people, we're tough as nails, we're organized, and we're prepared. After Hurricane Katrina, a group of Burners went to NOLA and set up their camps in parking lots and proceeded to provide services on par with the Red Cross at a fraction of the cost.

[Edited 2012-11-24 23:47:16]

User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12270 posts, RR: 25
Reply 53, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2048 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 52):
After Hurricane Katrina, a group of Burners went to NOLA and set up their camps in parking lots and proceeded to provide services on par with the Red Cross at a fraction of the cost.

Did their camp include a 'Jiffy Lube' tent? 



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinesccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5484 posts, RR: 28
Reply 54, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2044 times:

The effective and efficient help by the Burners does not surprise; nothing like a bureaucracy to hinder and delay the delivery of assistance (I had my own involvement in Katrina relief, saw first-hand who was and who was not effective; it was the agile, those unbound by ridiculous constraints, who got things done. FEMA was not the problem.

---

I found, today, another CFL that failed much sooner than it should have. Again, I suspect that the CFLs, after application of their other negative attributes, do not work out to be as efficient (this includes manufacturing and disposal burden) or economical as we are led to believe. When used in long-duration applications (not a lot of on/off), they sem more robust. When used to replace lights which are frequently on and off, they are less optimal, failing earlier and (of course) taking longer to reach effective illumination levels (unless you use larger lamps than needed, which would seem to defeat the purpose).



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
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