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Egypt Bans Dissent  
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8711 posts, RR: 24
Posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3992 times:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20451208

Quote:
Egypt's President Mohammed Mursi has issued a declaration banning challenges to his decrees, laws and decisions.

The declaration also says no court can dissolve the constituent assembly, which is drawing up a new constitution.

President Mursi also sacked the chief prosecutor and ordered the retrial of people accused of attacking protesters when ex-President Mubarak held office.

Egyptian opposition leader Mohammed ElBaradei accused Mr Mursi of acting like a "new pharaoh".

So much for democracy and the rule of law in Egypt. Either the people will rise up against him and do a 'Mubarak' on him, or we may be seeing another Iran form up.


Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
69 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCadet985 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 1513 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

Here we go again...another Arab Spring in a few months?

Marc


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 2, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3945 times:

Is Mursi becoming a clone of Mubarak? Looks like it, methinks.


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 6942 posts, RR: 18
Reply 3, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3927 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Thread starter):
So much for democracy and the rule of law in Egypt. Either the people will rise up against him and do a 'Mubarak' on him, or we may be seeing another Iran form up.

Wow. Just wow. But I'm not surprised.

Quoting Cadet985 (Reply 1):
Here we go again...another Arab Spring in a few months?

I wouldn't be surprised, but they deserve it. Honestly, you know who you're voting for when you vote for them.

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 3):
Is Mursi becoming a clone of Mubarak? Looks like it, methinks.

Islamism at it's worst. Or at it's only. Honestly, stop it with these religious ruled government!



One of the FB admins for PHX Spotters. "Zach the Expat!"
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3918 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 4):
Honestly, stop it with these religious ruled government!

Agreed! I don't understand why religion needs to come into play with everything. Look what happened to the woman who died in Ireland because of a religious rule banning against abortion.

This religious crap really needs to stop. It throws common sense out the window.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5098 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3904 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 5):
Agreed! I don't understand why religion needs to come into play with everything.


Unfortunately, Islam is not just a religion, it is a political movement. When a religion's tenets spell out the rules of life in minute detail, that religion becomes ingrained in all facets of life.

And yes, I know that there are other religions and/or sects that look to control all facets of life, but you don't see Mennonites blowing themselves up.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlineNewark727 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 1311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3850 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 4):
Islamism at it's worst. Or at it's only

Mubarak was not an Islamist.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 6):


Unfortunately, Islam is not just a religion, it is a political movement. When a religion's tenets spell out the rules of life in minute detail, that religion becomes ingrained in all facets of life.

And yes, I know that there are other religions and/or sects that look to control all facets of life, but you don't see Mennonites blowing themselves up.

You've refuted your own point. Other religions and/or sects have plenty of political activism and an all-encompassing set of rules about life is something almost all religions have, it just so happens that Islam is in a region that is extremely volatile politically and its current theology is shaped accordingly. There have been periods of religious calm in the Middle East as well as there have been periods of tumult. Furthermore most Islamic nations have only recently been brought onto the world stage and held to standards of modern, global society and as such the institutions that moderate political extremism in the United States and elsewhere are weak or work in favor of the theocratic movements.


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8711 posts, RR: 24
Reply 7, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3821 times:

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 7):
You've refuted your own point. Other religions and/or sects have plenty of political activism and an all-encompassing set of rules about life is something almost all religions have, it just so happens that Islam is in a region that is extremely volatile politically and its current theology is shaped accordingly.

He has not. While other religions have their political adherents and agendas, only Islam explicitly states in its scripture that the church (or mosque) and state should be one and the same, and that any government not run as an Islamic theocracy enforcing religious law as civil and criminal law cannot be legitimate. There is no parallel in any other religion.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5098 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3818 times:

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 7):
You've refuted your own point.


No, my point was that there are plenty of religions and/or sects that impart a standard of living from which its adherents are expected to live, but rarely, except in Islam, do we see entire nations ruled by the religion.

Islam is as much a political system as it is a religion. You can't really say that about the other major religions of the world.

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 7):
Mubarak was not an Islamist.


Mubarak was a political animal who used religion when he saw advantage in using religion.

Mursi appears to be religious and is backed by the religious.

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 7):
Furthermore most Islamic nations have only recently been brought onto the world stage and held to standards of modern, global society and as such the institutions that moderate political extremism in the United States and elsewhere are weak or work in favor of the theocratic movements.


It's a very good point, and I've argued it before. But, it doesn't change the fact that these nations are on the world stage and they make the world more dangerous, not less.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away. Never leave your cave without your club.
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 6942 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3814 times:

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 7):
Mubarak was not an Islamist.

I never was talking about Hosni?

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 6):
And yes, I know that there are other religions and/or sects that look to control all facets of life, but you don't see Mennonites blowing themselves up.

Precisely. A little religion doesn't hurt, except when you have to ram it down someone's throat.....with the barrel of a rifle.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 9):
No, my point was that there are plenty of religions and/or sects that impart a standard of living from which its adherents are expected to live, but rarely, except in Islam, do we see entire nations ruled by the religion.

fr8mech's point was pretty clear.



One of the FB admins for PHX Spotters. "Zach the Expat!"
User currently offlinevenus6971 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 1437 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3808 times:

How is the new boss? Same as the old boss.


I would help you but it is not in the contract
User currently offlineNewark727 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 1311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3803 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 10):
I never was talking about Hosni?

You were quoting a post that referred to Morsi being "a clone" of Mubarak. Which while it may very well be what comes about, is not a result of Morsi's Islamism, necessarily.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 9):

No, my point was that there are plenty of religions and/or sects that impart a standard of living from which its adherents are expected to live, but rarely, except in Islam, do we see entire nations ruled by the religion.

Depends on how you define "rarely," and depends on how you define "ruled by." Islam creates the political ideologies, but the outcomes are dependent on way more than that, and degrees of separation between religion and politics vary from country to country (though seem to be way closer than in Europe and the United States.)

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 9):

Mubarak was a political animal who used religion when he saw advantage in using religion.

Mursi appears to be religious and is backed by the religious.

True enough. Doesn't make much of a difference as to quality of governance on its own, though.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 9):

It's a very good point, and I've argued it before. But, it doesn't change the fact that these nations are on the world stage and they make the world more dangerous, not less.

Some of them certainly do, but I sincerely doubt that that Islam as a faith has much to do with it. The pattern I see in the Arab Spring tumult is that the countries tend to be run in a kind of clan/patronage system where the leader's friends and relatives form a core faction/powerbase and benefit accordingly; it's hard to bring pluralism and self-determination into that without turning lots and lots of people against each other. It's very far from a clear parallel but it reminds me a bit of caudillos in South America. Israel and the United States form a convenient distraction and/or complication and/or excuse.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18681 posts, RR: 58
Reply 12, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3751 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Thread starter):
So much for democracy and the rule of law in Egypt. Either the people will rise up against him and do a 'Mubarak' on him, or we may be seeing another Iran form up.


We all knew it was going to happen. They freely elected themselves another dictator. I wonder if this one will be better. The trouble with a theocracy isn't so much the lack of a moral compass, but rather that the moral compass always points north, even while your holy shock troops are raping and killing.


User currently offlineaerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 6900 posts, RR: 13
Reply 13, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3726 times:

Quoting venus6971 (Reply 11):
How is the new boss? Same as the old boss.

Same with post-Gaddafi Libya, will be same for Syria and any other country which has had a civil uprising recently. That is the biggest reason for not getting involved at all in any of these countries. No point endorsing another nutcase to replace the old nutcase. Given that they all seem hellbent on screwing up their own nations, may as well leave them to it with no outside involvement


User currently offline11Bravo From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1716 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3721 times:

Anyone surprised by this hasn't been paying attention to the Middle East for the last, well,... forever. We are still a long way from any Arab country adopting a real representative government based on the Rule of Law and acceptance of pluralism and respect for human rights. Maybe a nice little kingdom or perhaps a totalitarian theocracy would work out better for the Egyptians.


WhaleJets Rule!
User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 259 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3683 times:

Welcome to the world of an Islamic state

User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 3664 times:

Quoting 11Bravo (Reply 14):
Anyone surprised by this hasn't been paying attention to the Middle East for the last, well,... forever.

It's kinda difficult to do that when its the same old crap they pull, but on different day. People get bored of it and just move on.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7276 posts, RR: 52
Reply 17, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3612 times:

This is a bad move indeed but I'm not gonna be so fast to write off Egypt. We can't expect a 1st world democracy out of the blue, hopefully the new Egypt will be a step in the right direction. They have been helping out with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict...


Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8616 posts, RR: 43
Reply 18, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3588 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 17):
This is a bad move indeed but I'm not gonna be so fast to write off Egypt.

Exactly. The usual suspects will (or rather, have) of course wail and cry over the supposed creation of another theocracy, but the rest of us are probably going to remember how the Egyptians ousted Mubarak and realise that they haven't lost too much of that fervour:

Quote:
Anti-government protests flare across Egypt

Protesters have spent Friday night in Tahrir Square in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, to show their anger at President Mursi's adoption of sweeping new powers.

More than 100 people have been injured in clashes across Egypt after President Mohammed Mursi passed a decree giving himself almost unchecked power.

However Mr Mursi says he is leading Egypt to "freedom and democracy".



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18681 posts, RR: 58
Reply 19, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 3451 times:

Quoting aloges (Reply 18):
Exactly. The usual suspects will (or rather, have) of course wail and cry over the supposed creation of another theocracy, but the rest of us are probably going to remember how the Egyptians ousted Mubarak and realise that they haven't lost too much of that fervour:

Great. So they can elect themselves an other "proper Islamic" dictator again and again. Perhaps, one day, they will realize that their personal idea of "proper Islamic" differs from those of their neighbors enough that maybe it's best that the government not be anyone's idea of "proper Islamic."

Perhaps one day...


User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 3448 times:

While Morsi has his supporters much of the opposition on the streets is coming from those who do not want a "proper Islamic" state. They are and have been calling for greater democracy and freedom for all Egyptians. Those are the people we should be encouraging, rather than smugly saying, "I told you so."

Couple of points to remember. Despite the protestations of the judiciary of interference with their independence, the judiciary remains in large part those appointed by Mubarak. They have been trying to block the work of the Constituent Assembly charged with drafting a new constitution. Second, Morsi has reiterated that once the Assembly has finished drafting a constitution it will be put to the vote in a referendum.

It remains to be seen if this will happen, so it may be premature to bemoan the rise of a theocratic dictatorship. The best guarantee against that happening is the continued self-organisation of the people. We might also like to remember that democracy did not just fall into place in Western Countries but arose out of decades of struggle. Why would we expect a perfect democracy in Egypt when the West was willing to prop up a regime in which the real independence of political parties was stifled?

While there is a danger that Morsi may attempt to consolidate his position, I do note that the extension of immunity to members of the Constituent Assembly is similar to the immunity enjoyed by members of parliament in Western Countries. Nor can a judge in the West typically dissolve Parliament.


User currently offlinemandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6590 posts, RR: 75
Reply 21, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3399 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 7):
only Islam explicitly states in its scripture that the church (or mosque) and state should be one and the same, and that any government not run as an Islamic theocracy enforcing religious law as civil and criminal law cannot be legitimate. There is no parallel in any other religion.

Really? I guess my country isn't Islamic   

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
You can't really say that about the other major religions of the world.

And oh, how many non-Islamic countries still have an official 'state religion' ?

Back to Egypt... the people of Egypt deserve better after all they've been through... but given it has just come out of a long dictatorship... it'll take a while before it all settles down into a proper new direction... but then, Morsi making these laws, are just making it... errr... potentially way skewed! I'll just wait and see...



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8711 posts, RR: 24
Reply 22, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3360 times:

Quoting mandala499 (Reply 21):
Really? I guess my country isn't Islamic

Be happy about that. Most countries bow to the state religion (if they have one), but don't take everything in it fortunately.

Quoting mandala499 (Reply 21):
And oh, how many non-Islamic countries still have an official 'state religion' ?

How many of them restrict the rights of those who are not of the state religion, in civil and criminal matters, impose additional taxes on them like the Jizya?

Anyway, The point is not an Islam bash-fest. But we can't fight the problem unless we recognize that the main reason why we have a big problem with Islamic fundamentalism is that there are some pretty radical things in the Quran and Hadiths that encourage it. The same might be said about other religions, but not to the same extent - which is why we don't have as many problems with fundamentalists of those religions.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8616 posts, RR: 43
Reply 23, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3346 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 19):
Perhaps one day...

That describes our own long and painful ways to democracy just perfectly.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinemandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6590 posts, RR: 75
Reply 24, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3330 times:

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 22):
But we can't fight the problem unless we recognize that the main reason why we have a big problem with Islamic fundamentalism is that there are some pretty radical things in the Quran and Hadiths that encourage it. The same might be said about other religions, but not to the same extent - which is why we don't have as many problems with fundamentalists of those religions.

I disagree with the "encourage"... I don't feel encouraged to do whatever they do...
Extent, also, I disagree... I've seen some pretty bad fundamentalists from the faiths here... but one thing we can agree on, they're all pretty damn freaky, and I hope none of them gets into any government!



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
25 DocLightning : I guarantee you the Bible has at least as many passages that can be taken to promote violent totalitarianism. And do. I give you the Dark Ages. And I
26 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : Egypt is about to go bankrupt should the present situation continue. http://www.almasryalyoum.com/node/1266716 GOOGLE TRANSLATE Member of the Board of
27 fr8mech : Having a official religion is quite different from having a religious government.
28 PHX787 : There's a difference between governing by Sharia/Fundamentalism and just saying there's a religion in this country.
29 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : Egypt crisis: Morsi refuses to back down Judges say Morsi has failed to end the impasse 13:30 Back on Tahrir, Ahram Online journalist Zeinab El-Guindy
30 Quokkas : On the surface this may be true, but do not forget that the constitutions of some western countires, nominally democratic, require the head of state
31 Dreadnought : One might be surprised at this, but I don't recall Obama or anyone in his administration coming out and condemning in any way Morsi's decree. Of cour
32 DeltaMD90 : I highly doubt this (harmless) comment has anything to do with it. And honestly, I was surprised myself to see this chant. I guess anything they hate
33 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : Didn't Obama come up with some big money for Mursi and the MB after he got elected in place of Mubarak? Protests are still going strong n Cairo and ot
34 DeltaMD90 : The US (for some strange reason) just gives money to a bunch of countries, including Egypt, so I'm not sure if it's really the President's fault
35 Newark727 : Might have had something to do with Egypt playing mediator between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. Also, a State Department spokesperson did have a few rem
36 Quokkas : Would things have been any different under a different President? We don't know but we can speculate. The previous administration was fearful of chan
37 Post contains images PHX787 : Well Its something we really shouldn't have given anyway since we're in massive debt Morsi is now the new Gaddafi.....of course Gaddafi didn't rule w
38 Post contains links n229nw : There is no comparison, not yet. In fact, Morsi seems ready to back down partly here over the last day or two and compromise after the protests--whic
39 DeltaMD90 : Thing to remember is the transition to democracy is usually hard. The US was pretty unstable after the Revolutionary War and we created a whole govern
40 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : Some interesting facts about Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi Morsi was born in Northern Egypt, and is the eldest brother of five. He recalls riding
41 Post contains links DocLightning : I never did get how a scientist can also be a religious fundamentalist. It's as if you have to turn off half of your brain to believe the crap that t
42 DeltaMD90 : Yeah, average politicians, even the sleaziest of the bunch, rarely make full blown authoritative moves. It's very wrong, whether he rode a donkey or
43 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : News breaking: Egypt's President Mursi fled the presidential Palace via Helicopter. Morsi has escaped from the back door of the palace once the protes
44 DocLightning : Well, this is interesting. A second revolution? Perhaps this one will be less bloody. Dare we hope that the Egyptians are figuring out that a theocra
45 DeltaMD90 : Well I did hear that most democratic revolutions often have to go through several overthrows (and often bloodshed) to finally get a good, stable gove
46 L-188 : Apparently that no protest law isnt workibg. Sad part it mosy open up the coubtry to thar cookoo's from the muslim britherhood to move in
47 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : News breaking: 04 December 2012, 20:10 Islamist leader to Al-Arabiya: We will declare jihad if anyone infringes on Morsi's legitimacy. http://www.naha
48 DocLightning : Or other extremists. Extremists offer certainty in times of turmoil. Mind you, they can't actually back up their offers, but they can make the offer.
49 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : 2035 GMT: Egypt. Alexandria tonight: http://www.enduringamerica.com/stora...RESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1354653364443 Egypt. Protests - Reuters live feed htt
50 par13del : Except these people are usually docile and when you encourage them to step forward they actually get killed or run to ground, a lot is accomplished b
51 Post contains links MadameConcorde : Morsi and Obama are buddies. Quote: "President Obama has been very helpful, very helpful," Morsi told Time Magazine. "And I can say really that his de
52 Post contains images MadameConcorde : Cairo situation update: Reuters Tahrir live cam knocked down. I wonder if Mursi went to work today. He is said to live in his home and gets ferried to
53 Post contains links directorguy : The problem now is with the constitution, written by Morsi's Islamist allies (the overwhelming majority of the non-Islamists walked out of the writing
54 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : This is getting really ugly Tanks on the streets in Cairo Muslim Brotherhood starting their crackdown. Witnesses counted at least five tanks and nine
55 fridgmus : Like we didn't see this coming!
56 Dreadnought : I remember watching TV on Christmas in 1989 - soon after the fall of the Berlin Wall, we were basically watching Nicolae Ceausescu's fall from power
57 TheCol : Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood are in power at the leisure of the Egyptian military. If the General's decide things are getting out of hand, then th
58 Post contains links Dreadnought : Don't you remember this summer, when Morsi forced all the top military commanders to 'retire' and replaced them with his own supporters? http://www.n
59 Post contains links Quokkas : With all the talk of how Egypt is regressing, I wonder how many have actually read the draft constitution? The document does include some points that
60 directorguy : In the 1923 constitution, Islam was the state religion. In the new 1971 constitution, Islam became a principle source of legislation, and in 1981 Mub
61 Quokkas : Agreed. I know that it is common in many countries to establish a state religion, even in many European countries, so I suppose it comes down to how
62 Post contains links Quokkas : The decree that granted the president powers to declare emergency laws and shield him from judicial oversight at the centre of current protests has be
63 directorguy : Morsi has not agreed to postpone the referendum. I do wonder what the results will be. The MB have a clear, vested interest in winning this, and furth
64 n229nw : But surely boycotting the referendum is the opposition shooting themselves in the feet. Wouldn't it be much better if they round up the vote and vote
65 ImperialEagle : Freedom of speech appears to be anethama to the hardline Islamists. I guess we will continue to see more and more incidents of this kind.
66 TheCol : Mubarak had a lot of supporters in the military as well, until they got sick of his BS. One thing the Egyptian military has proven over the years is
67 directorguy : Very true. Bad politicians are voted in by good people who don't vote. Another alternative is if the constitutional referendum is passed, then it's a
68 MadameConcorde : It is not like Mursi took power by force. There was an election where voters had a choice between Shafik and Mursi. He is a democratically elected pre
69 DeltaMD90 : Do you really believe this? Are you serious? Can you not see the power grabs taken by Mursi? Was he democratically elected to behave like a dictator?
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