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Worst Hurricanes  
User currently offlinetommy767 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 6826 posts, RR: 9
Posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2206 times:

I just lived through Sandy, but I knew in the back of my mind that storms like Katrina and Andrew were so much worse:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heRS96YVP3k&feature=share

This video is a documentary of Andrew 10 years later. It makes Sandy look almost minor in comparison. Can you recall any hurricanes that still ring in your mind today?

--T


"KEEP CLIMBING" -- DELTA
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6448 posts, RR: 32
Reply 1, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2200 times:
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Well. It really depends on how you were affected by it. Not so much on the Hurricane´s intensity. If you are a Central American,"Mitch" probably will not be forgotten soon. I can tell you that here in Monterrey, "Gilberto" and "Alex" are two storms we won´t forget anytime soon. How were we affected?

I can tell you that our urban landscape was visibly changed after both hurricanes, and it cost billions of dolars too.


User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7847 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2179 times:

Quoting tommy767 (Thread starter):
I just lived through Sandy, but I knew in the back of my mind that storms like Katrina and Andrew were so much worse:

Sandy was a very weak hurricane, in comparison. When it made landfall, it was a category-1 hurricane. A weak Cat 1. Here's the thing; Sandy was being directed by a number of high-pressure areas and the remnants of the El/La niña cycle, which allowed the windsheer in the higher-levels of the atmosphere to prevent the hurricane from strengthening, while expanding, allowing such a large surge.

If you want a hurricane of hurricanes, try Typhoon Tip in 1979. That thing was the largest, strongest, and most powerful tropical cyclone on record. Imagine if that thing hit the east coast. We'd be talking about so much death and destruction, it'd be unfathomable.



我思うゆえに我あり。(Jap. 'I think, therefore I am.')
User currently offlineKFLLCFII From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3307 posts, RR: 30
Reply 3, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2141 times:

The Great Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 had the stuff of legend.

A compact storm like Andrew but smaller, at a time even before satellites when forecasting was about as good as word-of-mouth of changing conditions and imprecise storm alerts via radio or telegraph. The storm roared across the upper Florida Keys with what would remain today as the record for the most intense U.S. hurricane at landfall, packing 892 millibars of pressure and estimated 185mph sustained winds (which was later re-analyzed to be more likely around 200mph by NOAA).

The storm struck at a time when the country was already suffering its worst depression. Notably, hundreds of World War I veterans who were put to work on a WPA program to "earn" their service bonuses early (the "Bonus Army"), trying to feed their families by working on a project which would connect The Florida Keys by highway, were ravaged by a storm surge which swept them out to sea before a late Florida East Coast Railway rescue train could take them safely out of danger. Of the bodies that were located, many were found among mangroves up and down the island chain for a time to come. Hearing of the news, Ernest Hemingway even sailed his fishing yacht Pilar up from Key West to assist with rescue efforts.

The storm also notably sealed the fate of the Key West Extension of the Florida East Coast Railway, which was already in receivership by 1931 due to the Depression, when 40 miles of right-of-way was destroyed and not enough money (or traffic) to rebuild. What cost over $50 million to construct out of "retired" Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler's personal fortune was sold to the state of Florida for $640,000, its bridges and roadbeds later assisting in completing the Overseas Highway.

Some say that had it not been for the miles upon miles of man-made landfill used during construction of the railroad extension, the water would have had better channels around the islands for the surge to pass, rather than right over them. There are claims that locals made, at the time of construction, such an ominous warning to the railroad about doing so.



"About the only way to look at it, just a pity you are not POTUS KFLLCFII, seems as if we would all be better off."
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21791 posts, RR: 55
Reply 4, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2135 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 2):
Sandy was a very weak hurricane, in comparison. When it made landfall, it was a category-1 hurricane. A weak Cat 1.

Categories can be misleading. In terms of energy released, Sandy was more powerful than both Katrina and Andrew due to its sheer size. The winds weren't particularly strong, but they spread over a huge area, and thus those who didn't get a direct hit from Sandy ended up worse than those who didn't get a direct hit from Katrina or Andrew (though those who did get a direct hit got it much worse in those two storms).

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13169 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 2134 times:

Hurricane Sandy directly or indirectly killed well over 100 people in it's path, the deadliest hurricane in the USA since Katrina and the worst in 50 years in the Eastern/Northeastern USA in many years. It hit severely an area that has rarely seen hurricanes, in an overdeveloped area in one of the world's biggest media markets. It badly damaged mass transit, ports, key car tunnels, coastal properties and wide spread tree falls with power outages in a way never seen before. It raised attention as to long-term global warming/climate change so we may see more severe storms like this in this region with it's costs.
True, Sandy wasn't as severe as Andrew or Katrina but it had its own dynamics and affects that makes it one of the most costly natural disasters in the USA in generations.


User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16891 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 2134 times:

I was on vacation with my family at the Harbor Beach Marriott in Fort Lauderdale as Hurricane Andrew approached, we woke up the day before the storm (clear Sunny day) to alarms going off in the hotel and announcements being made in English and German (guess there were lots of German vacationers staying in the Hotel) to evacuate. They did not tell us where, just evacuate. We drove to MIA to try and catch a flight but it was a mob scene, I later saw myself on CNN waiting in front of the terminal at MIA. We then went to the MIA airport Marriott to stay until the storm passed and could get a flight out, however when we got there and saw no one was going to be allowed into their rooms but would instead have to sleep in the ballrooms we decided we needed to get out of town. The urgency of this decision was further amplified when we tried to stop to get some supplies at a supermarket and they had armed guards out in front of the stores letting small groups in at a time.

We got on the Florida Turnpike about 4Pm in Miami the day before the Storm, it took us until around 2am to reach Orlando. The traffic was horrible, and we started getting hit by the storm somewhere near Lake Okeechobee. The next morning I went outside of our hotel (Disney Caribbean beach resort) to see lots of trees down. But no where near the devastation that the news was showing out of Homestead. IIRC New Orleans also got hit hard by Andrew.



Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 7, posted (1 year 11 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 2103 times:

As noted above - it really depends upon how the hurricane impacted you personally.

Sandy showed that a real tidal surge can do in a modern heavily urbanized area. While Sandy killed over 100 people, the 1900 Hurricane in Galveston Texas killed between 6,000 and 12,000 with its storm surge.

(Note - the insurance companies consider Tampa/ St Petersburg as the most 'in danger' area in the US for deaths and damage from a storm surge.)

Katrina showed what can happen when the evacuation plans break down.

Camille showed just how devastating a Cat V hurricane can be - and yet folks rebuilt in the same places, only to have Katrina come along decades later and destroy the Mississippi coast, again.

Some of the Pacific typhoons I've seen there results of make damage in the US seem minor.

The Bay of Bengal cyclones are 8 of the 10 deadliest storms in history - with up to half a million people killed in a 1970 storm.

When a storm impacts you - it is major.


User currently offlinesudden From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 2027 times:

Quoting tommy767 (Thread starter):
Worst Hurricanes

My ex. girfriend!



When in doubt, flat out!
User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2457 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1998 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 2):
If you want a hurricane of hurricanes, try Typhoon Tip in 1979. That thing was the largest, strongest, and most powerful tropical cyclone on record. Imagine if that thing hit the east coast. We'd be talking about so much death and destruction, it'd be unfathomable.

Man, you ain't kiddin'. Gives me the shivers.





  



Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlinetommy767 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 6826 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1974 times:

Quoting sudden (Reply 8):
My ex. girfriend!

Well said, sir!

Looks like Katrina is still in the top 3 deadliest US hurricanes along with Galveston (mentioned above) being the absolute worst:

http://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/usdeadly.asp

In terms of costliest US hurricanes it goes like this:

1. KATRINA 108 BILLION (2005)
2. SANDY 65 BILLION (2012)
3. IKE 31 BILLION (2008) -- almost a repeat of the Galveston hurricane from 1900
4. WILMA 29 BILLION (2005)
5. ANDREW 26.5 BILLION (1992)

I should also note that of the top 25 costliest, 3 were from 2005 and 4 were from 2004.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_costliest_Atlantic_hurricanes



"KEEP CLIMBING" -- DELTA
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 11, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Quoting tommy767 (Reply 10):
I should also note that of the top 25 costliest, 3 were from 2005 and 4 were from 2004.

That's because the value of the damage is impacted by inflation. But since replacments have to be paid with current dollars, we will always see the most costly hurricanes to be fairly recent.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14127 posts, RR: 62
Reply 12, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1964 times:

Early this year typhoon Sendong killed several thousand people in the Philippines. The main problem there was, although the meteorological government agency PAGASA had issued warnings that this typhoon would strike northern Mindenao, people didn´t take these warnings seriously, because they didn´t have a typhoon in this region for thirty years (most typhoons strike further north, at Masbate, Leyte, Bicol and Eastern Luzon).
So nobody was prepared when suddenly the massive rainfall caused the rivers leading from the inland mountains to the coast to rise by more than 4 meters within one hour and to turn these normally placid rivers into raging streams, escaping their beds, which washed all houses in their way into the sea. The worst was that this happened around 3 am local time, when everybody was fast asleep. Also, the residential areas along the riverbanks had mostly poorer inhabitants, living in single story houses made from plywood and corrugated iron sheets. The few concrete buildings generally withstood the surge and became refuges for neighbours, especially if they had more than one floor.
The cities of Cagayan de Oro and Iligan were the ones hit hardest.

Jan


User currently offlinegarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5419 posts, RR: 52
Reply 13, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1954 times:

Growing up in South Carolina, Hugo stood out to me. I remember being without power for a few days, being out of school, seeing just swaths of uprooted trees, even as far inland as we were in Columbia. We got through with minimal property damage - a few shingles blown off the roof and my sandbox was never seen again, but I still remember the fear. My sister and her husband lived in Charleston and came to stay with us prior to the storm landing.

Another one that stands out (and somewhat aviation related) is Hurricane Isabel as I flew from CAE to PHL during it in a Dornier 328. The FA came around and started telling something to every passenger and when she got to me she told me that the plane's weather radar had died and that we were having to divert to PIT because of this. Looking out over the mountains of WV and seeing rain freezing up on the plane's wings gave me a slight pucker factor! We ended up being stuck at PIT for a few hours because in the time it took the weather radar to be repaired/replaced, the pilots had to go into a rest period and PHL went on a ground stop.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2457 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1938 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 12):
The main problem there was, although the meteorological government agency PAGASA had issued warnings that this typhoon would strike northern Mindenao, people didn´t take these warnings seriously, because they didn´t have a typhoon in this region for thirty years

I was born and raised in south Florida up until February of 1992. The only hurricane experience I had was David in 1979 and that was a glancing blow when it wasn't even at it's strongest. Then a little storm called Andrew came along. South Florida had beyond a wake up call with that hurricane because of the same reason. They are a major catastrophe that can be avoided days in in advance. Why the hell wouldn't you leave??



Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7240 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1936 times:

I was only 3 years old during hurricane Andrew. My family lived farther north from the worst hit areas. However it was expected to make a direct hit on Miami making a last minute turn south. My family and I actually evacuated as we lived in an evacuation zone south not north closer to the damage. I remember one thing from Andrew and that is walking outside and seeing trees down everywhere and being in the car seeing all the destroyed homes. Probably my earliest memory I can recall now in my life.

I remember a bunch of other smaller storms that were not really a big deal down here. I remember Katrina very well when it made its first weak landfall on Miami before going to NOLA. I also remember Wilma well from high school. That is the storm which effected me the most I think. Thankfully nothing much just some trees down no major damage to anything. The worst thing was not having power for 4 days getting it back for a day and losing it for another 2 but really compared to what other people had to deal with that was no problem. Just meant early nights and lots of reading.

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 11):
That's because the value of the damage is impacted by inflation. But since replacments have to be paid with current dollars, we will always see the most costly hurricanes to be fairly recent.

Exactly. I saw a chart once that put the dollars from older storms to present dollars.
The Great 1026 Miami Hurricane was a big one. That storm destroyed Miami and gave the huge building boom of the 20s an early end in Miami before the depression hit.

Quote:
The damage from the storm was immense; few buildings in Miami or Miami Beach were left intact. The toll for the storm was $100 million ($1.31 billion 2012 USD). It is estimated that if an identical storm hit in the year 2005, with modern development and prices, the storm would have caused $140-157 billion in damage.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b9/1926_Miami_Hurricane_damage.jpg



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlinezippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5501 posts, RR: 13
Reply 16, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1933 times:

Quoting tommy767 (Thread starter):

Not to pick hairs but do you mean 20 years?

Some of the worst Hurricanes I remember, in no particular order:
Rita
Wilma
Katrina
David
Camille
Cleo (my cousin and family were caught in Miami Beach in that one back in 1964)
Agnes (Not in the big bad ass categories but caused massive flooding in Maryland, and PA)



I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14127 posts, RR: 62
Reply 17, posted (1 year 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

Quoting PC12Fan (Reply 14):
They are a major catastrophe that can be avoided days in in advance. Why the hell wouldn't you leave??

Part of the reason is that especially the poorer people have no real place to go and are afraid that, if they would abandon their houses and property, looters would steal all.

Jan


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