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Julian Assange - Movement At The Station Pt 2  
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3883 posts, RR: 5
Posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4050 times:

As the first thread has now been archived due to lack of discussible news on Assanges self imposed confinement, might as well start a new thread  

Apparently he's suffering from a chronic lung infection and weight loss, and the Ecuadorians are still pushing for "fingers crossed" visits to hospital...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20537157

66 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4035 times:

Not much happening really, moo. The only 'news' appears to be that Assange is running out of money, due to the credit card people withdrawing support (no doubt under governmemt pressure)?

I don't know why the Ecuadorians keep pushing the 'safe conduct' business. They must know that, faced with an extradition warrant from Sweden, the British have no choice in the matter. Assange can go to hospital any time he likes - but he'll find himself under arrest as soon as he leaves the Embassy.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...politicians-of-blocking-funds.html


[Edited 2012-11-29 02:02:15]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3883 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4001 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 1):
The only 'news' appears to be that Assange is running out of money, due to the credit card people withdrawing support (no doubt under governmemt pressure)?

The bigger news there is that the EU has declined to launch an investigation into VISA and MasterCard withdrawing merchant accounts from WikiLeaks as they have decided it would not breach antitrust  

Poor poor Assange.


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3989 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 2):
Poor poor Assange.

He may actually be 'poor' nowadays! Though, as far as I know, the right to have credit card companies (which, after all, are just commercial organisations) provide services to you isn't covered by the 'four freedoms' (or any other legal code)?  

I've always had mixed feelings about Assange. On the one hand I enjoyed some of his revelations a lot. On the other, for my sins, I spent a bit of time in the field artillery, facing the Russians in Germany. We had (as far as I knew) three OPs (observation posts). The first one had been there since about 1946 - we used to see the Russians through the glasses, and wave; and they usually waved back. The second one was hopefully still secret; we had to crawl to it, and avoid waving. The third one was genuinely secret (as far as anyone knew); we had to 'wriggle' to that one, in the dark, and stay there, very much with 'heads down,' all day.........

If Assange and the internet had been around in those days, he'd very possibly have published information on all our OPs, and probably the gun positions as well. I don't suppose that that would actually have started WW3 and got us killed; but it would sure have meant us poor buggers having to do a hell of a lot of digging; at night, and mostly in the rain........  

All in all, I'm not overly sorry that he's out of business......



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3883 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3984 times:

My issue was they way he went around doing what he did - there's no way you can claim every one of a million documents is in the public interest, he was scattershotting and he didn't really care what was in there.

I also didn't like the fact that he considered private business contracts between two consenting entities as fair game either - what good does a contract between Airbus/Boeing and an airline do being in the public eye?

And then he rubbed me entirely up the wrong way by flat out saying that the British legal system didn't work.


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 5, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3887 times:

Apparently Assange isn't sick after all:-

"Ecuador's embassy in London has published a clarification about the health of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been living there for five months, saying there is no urgent problem.

"Ambassador Ana Alban, the South American country's envoy to Britain, told reporters in Quito on Wednesday that Assange "has a chronic lung condition that could worsen at any time".

"A statement posted on the London embassy's website on Thursday said: "In reference to reported comments of the Ambassador Ana Alban, Julian Assange does not have an urgent medical condition.

"We continue to seek the assurances from the UK and Swedish governments to enable him to live a normal life, free from the fear of extradition to the United States."


http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1...Assanges-lung-condition-not-urgent

The Ecuadorians must be desperate to see the back of him. But 'no joy' this time........



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7832 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3878 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 5):
free from the fear of extradition to the United States

Oh brother, he's still afraid of America? Doesn't he find it funny we haven't requested extradition?

And what does he have to say about the charges in Sweden? That Sweden (of all countries) is a puppet to America and they'll for some reason give him to us?

I think Assange is indeed sick... sick in the head



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8191 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3863 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 1):
The only 'news' appears to be that Assange is running out of money, due to the credit card people withdrawing support

What a shame. Reality is that none of the card companies want to be involved in a crime of violating security laws.

In reality it doesn't matter as apparently the guy is getting free room & board.

As to his health - a doctor can drop by and provide an Rx or two or three.


User currently offlineDoona From Sweden, joined Feb 2005, 3765 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3834 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 6):
And what does he have to say about the charges in Sweden? That Sweden (of all countries) is a puppet to America and they'll for some reason give him to us?

Yes, in contrast to the UK (whom we all know never bows to the might of the US), Sweden apparently enjoys some form of special relationship with the US. A military alliance, extensive co-operation in terms of intelligence and security. Goes back to Roosevelt. Or no, wait a minute...

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 6):
Oh brother, he's still afraid of America? Doesn't he find it funny we haven't requested extradition?

Could just be that he's actually guilty and figures to use his earlier role in Wikileaks to rouse the tin-foil people.

[quote=NAV20,reply=5]The Ecuadorians must be desperate to see the back of him. But 'no joy' this time........

I'm sure they thought granting him asylum temporarily would give them some some diplomatic leverage the UK and probably the US. Doesn't seem to have worked out that way.

Cheers
Mats



Sure, we're concerned for our lives. Just not as concerned as saving 9 bucks on a roundtrip to Ft. Myers.
User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 3805 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 6):
That Sweden (of all countries) is a puppet to America and they'll for some reason give him to us?

I don't know if you are familiar with the Muhammad al-Zery case but I posted links in the previous thread that showed Sweden had assisted in rendition of a "suspect" who was bundled into a vehicle, taken to the airport, placed in an executive jet with American registration N379P and shipped out to Egypt, where he underwent torture. The '"suspect" was later released without charge and the Swedish Government acknowledged their role in the affair when they paid him compensation.

I personally think that as long as he is able to remain in the media spotlight that it is unlikely that the Swedish would want to do anything similar. Not I think they do. Far from it.


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3883 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 3802 times:

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 9):
Muhammad al-Zery

Notable, but its also worth noting that a lot of those rendition flights went through the UK with the explicit permission of the British Government - I continue to fail to see why he would be any more safe here in the UK than in Sweden  


User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days ago) and read 3783 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 10):
I continue to fail to see why he would be any more safe here

Perhaps that fine old British tradition of forming an orderly queue? While the British were considering an extradition request from Sweden could they ignore it only to consider one from the US? That would be a poor show, old boy.  

But I agree that the British might be just as accommodating if the US were serious about Assange's extradition. So far it remains unclear on what grounds he could be charged, let alone extradited to the US.

At least in the example I gave (and it might be noted that a second person was extradited at the same time and has since been granted permanent residency in Sweden) there was an allegation of terrorist related activities. In comparison, the worst Assange can be accused of is embarrassing people by confirming what was already suspected. Selfish and egotistic? Maybe. But that isn't a crime but an essential trait of just about anyone who goes into politics as a career.

On the more serious allegations he should avail himself of the opportunity to clear himself. I can see that he might fear being wrongfully convicted as he may not be able to prove innocence. But by refusing to appear he simply confirms in the minds of many that he has something to answer for. He won't achieve an acquittal if he is innocent by hiding away in a bedsit in an Embassy in London where the hosts are growing weary of his presence.


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 12, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3751 times:

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 11):
Quoting moo (Reply 10):
I continue to fail to see why he would be any more safe here

Perhaps that fine old British tradition of forming an orderly queue?


My own feeling is that none of this ever had much to do with any possible extradition to the USA. That all Assange was interested in was 'getting out from under' the Swedish rape charges; but he brought the US possibility into it to make his own position look more respectable ('heroic leaker' as opposed to 'casual rapist').

I think, further, that neither he nor the Ecuadorians involved looked up British 'law and practice' with regard to extradition warrants. My guess is that both he and they thought, at the beginning, that the granting of asylum would entitle him just to head for the airport and leave Britain in the normal way. In fact, what with the repeated requests for 'safe conduct to a hospital,' they still don't seem to have got the message..........

Anyway, there appear to be only two options open to Assange. Either give himself up and take his chances in the Swedish courts; or face what will amount to 'life imprisonment' in his Embassy bedsit...........



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlinePu From Sweden, joined Dec 2011, 695 posts, RR: 13
Reply 13, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3732 times:

Isn't a diplomatic pouch whatever an embassy says it is? ..and aren't embassy cars immune from search?

Build a coffin-type box adequate to live in for a few hours and have it loaded unto an Ecuadorian (or friendly 3rd party) ship for Guayaquil....After its free of British waters....the box can open, maybe?

Just for the sake of drama I want something like this attempted.



Pu


User currently offlinecmf From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3717 times:

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 9):
I don't know if you are familiar with the Muhammad al-Zery case

Are you aware of the aftermaths in Sweden?


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8191 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3713 times:

Quoting Pu (Reply 13):

Isn't a diplomatic pouch whatever an embassy says it is? ..and aren't embassy cars immune from search?

Going from the building to the car isn't protected and the police would block the car if they tried.


User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6389 posts, RR: 54
Reply 16, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3710 times:

Quoting Pu (Reply 13):
Build a coffin-type box adequate to live in for a few hours and have it loaded unto an Ecuadorian (or friendly 3rd party) ship for Guayaquil....After its free of British waters....the box can open, maybe?

Just for the sake of drama I want something like this attempted.

I believe that something like that is going to happen, maybe not tomorrow, but sooner or later. And with British "assistance".

He has already served a longer sentence than anything he could fear in Sweden. And as long as he doesn't turn himself in to Sweden he will continue to be "imprisoned" in countries which do not deliver him to Sweden. He will not be a free man until he has faced the Swedish judge.

I believe that the Englishmen one day will find a way to make him "accidentally" disappear. Game over, and everybody will be happy, including the Swedes. It is not like Sweden fears that if he gets out of the embassy, then he will sneak into Sweden and rape all Swedish women.

"He fooled us by growing a beard and having his hair tinted. He walked in on black shoes, but must have walked out on brown shoes". Something like that we may hear from Britain one day. Game over.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 17, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3691 times:

Quoting Pu (Reply 13):
aren't embassy cars immune from search?

Good point, PU, I should have covered it. Yes, if the building had a basement car park Assange could indeed be driven to Heathrow in a diplomatic car, enjoying diplomatic immunity. But the buildings in that part of Central London are mostly 'Edwardian,' built in the early 1900s, more or less before cars were invented - so the Embassy doesn't have a car park. So Assange can only leave on his feet.........

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 16):
I believe that the Englishmen one day will find a way to make him "accidentally" disappear. Game over, and everybody will be happy, including the Swedes.

I don't think the current situation presents any particular problem for the British, prebennorholm. It only 'costs' them a few policemen on duty; one in the lobby (by arrangement with the building owners) and a couple in the street outside. It's their duty to do that, under their extradition treaty with Sweden. Further, they'd be in direct breach of that treaty if they 'conspired' to allow Assange to escape......



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 18, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3616 times:

I like the coffin idea, just neglect to put air holes in it.

Many people have died all over the world because of this mans actions.

Speaking of his actions, anybody still thing he is innocent of rape after his act the past coule of years



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6389 posts, RR: 54
Reply 19, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3615 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 17):
I don't think the current situation presents any particular problem for the British, prebennorholm. It only 'costs' them a few policemen on duty; one in the lobby (by arrangement with the building owners) and a couple in the street outside. It's their duty to do that, under their extradition treaty with Sweden. Further, they'd be in direct breach of that treaty if they 'conspired' to allow Assange to escape......

What I had in mind was not a breach of the extradition treaty. I imagined a secret agreement with the Swedes in advance. I'm pretty sure that the Swedes will be more than happy never to see the man again. If he ever shows up in the Sweden, then a trial might easily collect quite a few strange people in Stockholm for some riot like activities (unless it is winter and miserable cold of course).

If the Ecuadorians really want to keep the man, then it just seems so convenient for everybody. Too convenient to ignore in the long run.

And add to that, Assange has already suffered more than enough for what crime he may have committed in Sweden.

Who woundn't rather spend a year in a Swedish prison than six months in an Equadorian embassy?



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7832 posts, RR: 52
Reply 20, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3611 times:

Quoting L-188 (Reply 18):
Many people have died all over the world because of this mans actions.

While I think he went about releasing information very sloppily, do you have any proof of anyone that has died? I would not be surprised if many died but I haven't seen anything attributed to him. He could've released damning information without naming informants... that's just terrible

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 19):
I'm pretty sure that the Swedes will be more than happy never to see the man again.

I'm sure the Swedes respect their legal system more than political convenience, or at least I would hope

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 19):
And add to that, Assange has already suffered more than enough for what crime he may have committed in Sweden.

For rape?? Then again, I'm not too educated on Swedish laws, I hope rape would carry a little more of a heftier sentence.

Plus he hasn't suffered for any crimes, he's choosing to stay in the embassy. I couldn't care less if he spends a 100 years in there, that's his own doing, and I would not find it wrong to send him to jail for any crime he may be dodging.

I don't care for the man, but what I am saying is not being said in revenge, just the reality of the situation



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6389 posts, RR: 54
Reply 21, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3610 times:

Quoting L-188 (Reply 18):
Many people have died all over the world because of this mans actions.

It depends on how you look at it.

He did unveil for a large number of governments - especially the US government - that their data security measures were inadequate. And they scrambled to correct that.

If he had not done that, then someone else would have done it later. And had it been done more secretly, then it could easily have caused a lot more harm.

In fact we don't know if serious secret leaks have been done before Assange, leaks which now have become impossible because he showed us that improved security was needed.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineprebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6389 posts, RR: 54
Reply 22, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3596 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 20):
For rape?? Then again, I'm not too educated on Swedish laws, I hope rape would carry a little more of a heftier sentence.

From what I have heard the case is that a drunken woman shall have discovered too late that he didn't honor an agreement to use a rubber thing.

With my limited knowledge about the Swedish justice system, then - if found guilty - I wouldn't be surprised at all if he would get away with a fine and/or economic compensation to the victim.

Maybe they might put him in custody, but certainly not to rotten away for years. But it wouldn't surprise me if they just handed him an invoice.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 23, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3586 times:

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 19):
Who woundn't rather spend a year in a Swedish prison than six months in an Equadorian embassy?
Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 20):
For rape?? Then again, I'm not too educated on Swedish laws, I hope rape would carry a little more of a heftier sentence.

Looks like, if convicted, he could cop at least two years, and possibly up to six. And it won't help him that there were allegedly two women involved - that would appear to rule out any sort of 'momentary lapse' defence.........

“A person who by assault or otherwise by violence or by threat of a criminal act forces another person to have sexual intercourse or to undertake or endure another sexual act that, having regard to the nature of the violation and the circumstances in general, is comparable to sexual intercourse, shall be sentenced for rape to imprisonment for at least two and at most six years.

"This shall also apply if a person engages with another person in sexual intercourse or in a sexual act which under the first paragraph is comparable to sexual intercourse by improperly exploiting that the person, due to unconsciousness, sleep, intoxication or other drug influence, illness, physical injury or mental disturbance, or otherwise in view of the circumstances in general, is in a helpless state.

"If, in view of the circumstances associated with the crime, a crime provided for in the first or second paragraph is considered less aggravated, a sentence to imprisonment for at most four years shall be imposed for rape."


http://erlinghellenas.wordpress.com/2010/09/01/the-swedish-rape-law/



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 24, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3564 times:

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 22):

From what I have heard the case is that a drunken woman shall have discovered too late that he didn't honor an agreement to use a rubber thing.

With my limited knowledge about the Swedish justice system, then - if found guilty - I wouldn't be surprised at all if he would get away with a fine and/or economic compensation to the victim.

From what I´ve heard, it was a bit more serious.
In the first case, when she found out that he had disposed of the rubber and told him to get off, he allegedly used force to hold her down while finishing the business.
In the second case he allegedly penetrated the woman without the agreed protection while she was asleep and then again used force to finish.

Jan


25 AR385 : You are assuming that the Ecuadorians are naive at best, and/or incompetent at the worst. I can tell you that every government in Latin America that
26 NAV20 : I think it was probably more a matter of a hasty decision at the top, AR385 - directly between the president and Assange - and that they didn't 'do t
27 Post contains links moo : This is a reoccurring issue with the whole Assange saga - many of his "supporters" in these discussions don't actually know what hes charged with...
28 AR385 : I can see your attempt to take a jab at the Ecuadorians, and attempting to portray the government as a criminal enterprise. But you failed to mention
29 Post contains links NAV20 : Maybe a 'sign of movement'? Assange would possibly be well-advised to allow himself to be extradited to Sweden while he can still afford defence lawye
30 AR385 : Assange just spoke at the embassy in London and communicated his decision to run for office, a senate position in Australia in 2013. I assume that sen
31 NAV20 : Just dunno, AR385. I doubt that he stands much chance though, my sense is that he's increasingly viewed as a 'loser' here. In any case, the 'burning
32 AR385 : I don´t think that´s going to be difficult. He could play the martyr and if he chooses the right district (is that how elections work in the Land D
33 Quokkas : It is a fundamental principal in the Australian legal system that everyone is equal before the law. As a consequence Australian politicians do not en
34 moo : Sorry, no I wasn't taking a jab at hte Ecuadorians, I was merely pointing out that the Ecuadorian diplomatic circle is not as white as snow as people
35 NAV20 : Good point, AR385. I think he IS - or, more probably, he (and his supporters and advisers) are 'clutching at straws.' Unless the London Metropolitan
36 Quokkas : As pointed out in reply #33, standing for election to the Senate would provide Assange with no immunity from criminal prosecution or extradition. Eve
37 moo : My point was, he's still in the UK - Australian law colud make him perpetually immune to the laws of physics for all it would matter to UK law in thi
38 Ken777 : Not really. The guy has been a spoiled, big ego type of bum that forced himself on two girls. He's played the legal games in the UK without a care in
39 Quokkas : Absolutely agreed. As I previously stated: Standing for Parliament in Australia would not in any way provide immunity from prosecution for offences a
40 AR385 : Good for you. Here, our congressmen and senators are immune from all types of prosecution. And boy, do they take advantage of that fact. They can´t
41 NAV20 : My guess is publicity, AR385. If he doesn't perform, publicise secret files, etc., his supporters are just going to forget about him (and, most impor
42 Post contains images Rara : Proof please. Proof of a single death would suffice, let alone "many". Anyone who has their wits together just knows he didn't rape her. Because all
43 Post contains links cmf : There was a time when I thought so too. Then I read the police protocols ( http://www.nnn.se/nordic/assange/protocol.htm ) and now I think he is guil
44 moo : You see, the typical response of a Assange supporter - I highly doubt that anyone has followed up on the welfare of the many Afghani informants and v
45 DeltaMD90 : I used to be in the boat of saying he killed people, but you and others are right, there is no proof. My problem is how he released the documents, co
46 moo : The problem is two fold - firstly, there were literally millions of documents in the Wikileaks release, and secondly, they involved masses of unvette
47 Rara : I have just read the document, not sure whether I feel differently now. Assange certainly seems an unpleasant type, but I knew that before... Also, m
48 DeltaMD90 : Doesn't give him the right to avoid the court of law If I feared the US, I'd be more scared to be in the UK. I've heard that the UK is America's lapd
49 NAV20 : It's important to bear in mind that Sweden, at this stage, only want to question him; they haven't laid any charges yet. And also that if the USA eve
50 cmf : I'd do an important change to your definition. It is sex without consent. And that is what is said to have happened in Enköping : "she awoke and fel
51 Rara : I don't see it either, but I wouldn't bet my life on it (which is what he would essentially do). I have only the highest opinions of Sweden and their
52 cmf : We can have a discussion about what is rape and what isn't but as it relates to this case it has been determined that it is classified as rape both u
53 Rara : It hasn't though, has it? Otherwise Assange would be charged with rape in Sweden. But he's only "wanted for questioning". If such behaviour is really
54 Post contains images Quokkas : We all know that what is legal and what is done often is not the same. It was, and remains illegal to participate in "rendition". Yet several instanc
55 MD11Engineer : IIRC, in Sweden the police has to arrest a person first before they can charge him. E.g. there exist movies on Youtube taken by a crazy motorcycle ri
56 cmf : It has. Read the UK extradition ruling. It makes is absolutely clear that the accusations qualify as rape in both UK and Sweden. If he is guilty or n
57 DeltaMD90 : He can't be charged until he's there, according to Swedish law
58 Post contains links NAV20 : Apparently Assange is planning another 'balcony appearance' on Thursday. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news...ssage/story-fnb64oi6-1226537778427 Soo
59 AR385 : Here it is: Statement by Julian Assange after Six Months in Ecuadorian Embassy Thursday December 20th, 19:00 GMT "Six months ago – 185 days ago - I
60 L-188 : What a bunch of drivel from someone trying to remain relevant and unforgotten Julian be a man go back to Sweden and face your accusers!
61 Post contains images scbriml : A claim often made, especially by his detractors, but never backed-up.
62 NAV20 : Checked up on his election chances. Every election, half the Senate comes up for re-election. The bigger states elect or re-elect six senators each at
63 Rara : Seeking election in order to escape legal proceedings is a terrible strategy really. You could call it the Berlusconi way of doing things.
64 WrenchBender : Nav, I believe that if he is convicted and sentenced to greater than 2 years he can not stand for election. But until he is sentenced it should not af
65 DeltaMD90 : tl;dr, could only make it about half way through... what I want to hear about is why he should be able to dodge questioning for rape allegations? I d
66 Post contains links NAV20 : Don't often visit the Wikilleaks site, but there's one very interesting item on it at the moment. Assange is apparently down to his last thousand buck
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