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Question About The Fiscal Cliff  
User currently offlineCadet985 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 1551 posts, RR: 4
Posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1614 times:

So I'm not too financially savvy. I'm overseas currently, and am concerned about the fiscal cliff. My concern is that if there is no agreement to avoid it, that my US Dollars will be worthless. So should I trade them in for Shekels now, or are my concerns about this unfounded?

Marc

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineQFA380 From Australia, joined exactly 9 years ago today! , 2060 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1586 times:

No, the USD is not going to be worthless overnight. I'd be more worried about the long erosion of value through the quantitative easing processes and the financial wizardry of Operation Twist than a hacksawed effort (effort nonetheless) to bring the budget close to surplus.

Going over the cliff will mean an initial pain for long term strength, or you can have long drawn out pain as the can is kicked further down the road. Either way, I would not recommend trading USD for shekels, there's really no point. Also remember that the purchasing power of a domestic USD will not fall unless inflation skyrockets which is unlikely in the medium term.


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7551 posts, RR: 32
Reply 2, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1585 times:

The impact of the fiscal cliff is going to be to increase taxes and cut government services to the people in the United States.

It is not going to make a major change in the exchange rate of the USD and foreign currencies - at least quickly.

Quoting Cadet985 (Thread starter):
that my US Dollars will be worthless.

Frankly, if the USD were to become worthless, the currencies of many other nations would also become worthless. The turmoil would shutdown most international trade, including airlines.

Won't happen.


User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11517 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1536 times:

It is not a fiscal cliff. It was Congress not wanting to offend anyone, so they kicked the can down the road and said "if X does not happen by Y date (they kept chainging the date, too!) then taxes will go up and cuts will happen." That is all the "fiscal cliff" is.


Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineCadet985 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 1551 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1535 times:

Thanks everyone...I just don't totally understand it, and my wifi here in this hostel isn't the greatest, so the "What the Fiscal Cliff Means..." videos on CNN won't load for me.

Marc


User currently offlineArrow From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 2676 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1472 times:
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Please -- will you just go over the GD cliff and stop obsessing about it. Going over the cliff would be a good thing -- higher taxes and revenue -- which the US desperately needs, and much lower spending --which the US also desperately needs. Voila -- no more deficits. Any compromise reached by Congress will be nothing more than another short term band-aid, and another successful "kick the can down the road" move.


Never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
User currently offlinealberchico From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 2911 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1468 times:

Quoting Arrow (Reply 5):

Please -- will you just go over the GD cliff and stop obsessing about it. Going over the cliff would be a good thing -- higher taxes and revenue -- which the US desperately needs, and much lower spending --which the US also desperately needs. Voila -- no more deficits.

What's so bad about continually kicking the can down the road ? Now is not the time to implement a doomsday budget. Let's wait until the economy improves and this partisan crap ends before completely restructuring the economy. Which also brings a good point. Do politicians genuinely care about the good of the country or are they concerned only with their own narrow agenda and loyalty to party ideology ???



short summary of every jewish holiday: they tried to kill us ,we won , lets eat !
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1843 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 1432 times:
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Last summer the US debt limit was reached, (which is the amount of money that the US can borrow to pay the debts already incurred) congress had decided to leverage the raising of the debt limit to try to get spending cuts in the budget. Needless to say they were not able to get the spending cuts so as a compromise congress decided to em-panel a bipartisan super committee to come up with spending cuts in order to agree to raise the debt limit. The super committee was tasked with coming up with spending cuts or else the Bush/Obama tax cuts will all expire as well as a host of spending cuts across the board evenly split between defense and non-defense. The impact of letting these things occur over a long period will pave the way back into recession. Needless to say the super-committee failed and we are now headed to the sequestration. It seems all other routes to making a deal have also failed as well. As for US dollar being worthless, it wasn't worthless during any of the previous recessions so it's highly unlikely it would be when we go into a future recession.


The only valid opinions are those based in facts
User currently offlineNorthstarBoy From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1825 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1407 times:
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Given that the Tea Party gave birth to this pig in the first place, then strangled Obama into signing it by holding the debt ceiling hostage, I wonder if they could do the same thing again in February, but in reverse, forcing Obama to accept tax cuts for everyone while keeping the spending cuts intact?


Why are people so against low yields?! If lower yields means more people can travel abroad, i'm all for it
User currently onlinepar13del From Bahamas, joined Dec 2005, 7047 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1384 times:

Quoting alberchico (Reply 6):

What's so bad about continually kicking the can down the road ?
Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 7):
Last summer the US debt limit was reached, (which is the amount of money that the US can borrow to pay the debts already incurred) congress had decided to leverage the raising of the debt limit to try to get spending cuts in the budget.

Damage is being done to the USA by running the massive deficits, it is like an illness to the body, without a periodic checkup, when the damage comes to the surface it is often times too late to save your life.
Take jobs for example, when they started going overseas no one really gave it much thought until it became an avalanche, so now everyone and their granny has an acceptible excuse for it, and none of them involve lowering the cost of doing business in the USA, from massive regulations, lack of innovation, high labour / infrastructure cost, etc. etc. etc. everyone likes to get on unions who represent less than 50% of the workforce, another can kicking.

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 7):
Given that the Tea Party gave birth to this pig in the first place,

Lets be fair, the USA has been running deficit spending for a long long time with neither party doing anything about it, cutting the rate of increase in the deficit is the kicking the can down the road, when their was a surplus under Clinton, does anyone know how much of the surplus was used to pay off the national debt?
The Tea Party is putting the problems of the deficit front and center, their biggest problem is that they do not have good enough PR in explaining to the people the damage that deficit spending and its resulting federal debt has for the nation.
State's especially those who have balanced budget amendments know the consequences of running a deficit, those that do not also know since most of them make every effort to stay within their means and when they do go over get hit with high interest short term loans which do hurt.
Where the Tea Party fails is that they have not been able to shake the belief that the Federal government is always there to assist and they unlike states can run deficits and pile up debt to their heart content as there are no consequences.
Ask one question, rather than fighting about going over the cliff, not wanting to cut spending and fighting over raising taxes, why not just print more money and sell off US gold reserves, no one gets hurt right?
Taxes will stay where they are, spending will continue and if you print enough you can increase the rate of spending to cater for everyone going through these difficult times, when the economy comes you can revisit the situation.
There are consequences here too, which may be closer to the surface for all to see.


User currently offlineQFA380 From Australia, joined exactly 9 years ago today! , 2060 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 1372 times:

Quoting alberchico (Reply 6):
What's so bad about continually kicking the can down the road ?

You realise that consumers and business need certainty and they're incredibly resilient when they have it. Trust and certainty are the grease that allow the cogs of capitalism to flow smoothly. No one knows which last minute deal will be the one that fixes everything. Companies in the US have incredible balance sheets because they don't know what is going on and want to sit tight until they see. Going over the cliff will be painful, but once everyone knows the game, spending and investment will increase and the budget will be in a better position. Kicking the can is good for absolutely nobody except politicians and bureaucrats.


User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8681 posts, RR: 43
Reply 11, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 1363 times:

Quoting alberchico (Reply 6):
Let's wait until (...) this partisan crap ends before completely restructuring the economy.

I certainly don't mean to sound snarky, but that'll be the day when pigs are certified for airline service.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3928 posts, RR: 28
Reply 12, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1346 times:

"Fiscal cliff" is a made-up word designed to scare naive people into further deficits, as if government spending ever created any actual growth, or a rolling two-year tax break on something ever made someone make a 30+ years investment decision. I say, pedal to the metal, Thelma & Louise style.


Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8681 posts, RR: 43
Reply 13, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 1332 times:

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 12):
I say, pedal to the metal, Thelma & Louise style.

That's your formula for fixing the federal budget of the US?   



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
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