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I Didn't Expect An A  
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11596 posts, RR: 15
Posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 1624 times:

I am in school. Junior College and I just switched my major to business because I don't have the money to continue in architecture. I took one architecture class. I was never expecting an A. With my English skills, I was expecting a D at best. I got an F. An F. I want to break stuff. And people. An F. I know I didn't do that well, but an F? I tried. I made an effort. I wrote papers knowing English composition was not my strong suit and drew stuff knowing that I could not draw. I am so p*ssed off right now.


Life in the wall is a drag.
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 1617 times:
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Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
I tried. I made an effort. I wrote papers knowing English composition was not my strong suit and drew stuff knowing that I could not draw.

Chill. That is the important stuff. As long as you are happy with the effort you made, then a grade is just a mark on paper.

When I was getting my MBA in the US I once got a C. I was also pissed, but it was a subject of which I knew nothing as an udergrad and I knew I put a lot of effort and did my best.

Don´t worry about it.



MGGS
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31679 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1544 times:

Tell yourself to aim higher.....Aim for the stars so you reach the sky.....Aim for A next time and try to achieve it.


Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinekiwiinoz From New Zealand, joined Oct 2005, 2165 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1542 times:

Hi. Your English seems fine to me. Have you actually had it explained why you got an F? Perhaps there is some other area of competence that yuo need to focus on?

User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7702 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1519 times:
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Quoting kiwiinoz (Reply 3):
Your English seems fine to me

Yup, seems pretty ok. No reason why that should present a major obstacle to success.

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
drew stuff knowing that I could not draw

Haven't seen your drawing, but could obviously be a problem if you really think that you can't draw.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
.Aim for A next time and try to achieve it.

Very sound advice. If you expect to get a D, sounds like you're setting yourself up to fail somewhat.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3062 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1427 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 1):
Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
I tried. I made an effort. I wrote papers knowing English composition was not my strong suit and drew stuff knowing that I could not draw.

Chill. That is the important stuff. As long as you are happy with the effort you made, then a grade is just a mark on paper.

I have to be realistic here, but for the part I put in bold, that's good if you get a low but passing grade. My calculus course was divided into three courses up to a total of 11 credits (4 credits for the first two parts, 3 credits for the last one) and I got a C in the latter two ones. Of course I was disappointed, but given a calculus problem, I may be able to solve it just like an A student would.

Of course, the OP can get around the F and say "well, that course was really the one that made me realize that architecture is not for me" and no one would care about it.

Fact is sometimes we get into a major expecting something and end up disappointed. But at least you switched to plan B which is good. I've known people who get an F on their first college test and dropout altogether. Staying on and going to the end says a lot about you.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
Tell yourself to aim higher

I think the OP did, but (like me) set his expectations low. I usually aim for the A but set myself low expectations. That way I'm not disappointed by the outcome.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 2):
Aim for A next time and try to achieve it.

Spot on.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineNewark727 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 1341 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1396 times:

Your English sounds alright on here. What sort of feedback were you getting on your assignments, if any? Usually they don't just fail you without some sort of "see me after class" or other heads-up.

User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7893 posts, RR: 52
Reply 7, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1368 times:

I found that almost no teacher would fail a student if they met up with the teacher after class and show above-and-beyond effort to the teacher personally. The people I saw that usually failed were the ones who never spoke to the teacher except during the 1-1.5 hour block they were in class, and only when they were called upon.

I also see no problem with your English, I'm surprised to hear you have one. I'd:

1. Use ratemyprofessor.com for next semester and find an easier teacher. (hey, use every advantage to your favor!)
2. Meet with the teacher before and after many classes, and even send emails from time to time
3. Go in with some questions about a paper or advice or something--that goes far to show you really care
4. Realize you can get higher than a D, many before you with English speaking problems have gotten As
5. Pray you pass  



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineNewark727 From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 1341 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1324 times:

Also, you mention "English composition" specifically. That is one school subject that it has been a long time since I enjoyed, but people tell me that I'm good at it- I've aced most of my liberal arts classes that have required it, or at least come in at the high ranks. Inasmuch as I can identify tricks for liberal arts/English papers, they are these:
-Come out swinging. Usually teachers don't want to hear any more than a long sentence of scene-setting, exposition as to why what you're talking about is important, or anything like that in your introduction- they just want to read the thesis you'll be arguing in subsequent paragraphs, and what evidence you'll be using in those subsequent paragraphs to argue it. This may create an introduction paragraph that feels short, but the best places to worry about length are elsewhere. I was lucky enough to not have strict word counts for most of what I did, but it's my opinion from the feedback I've received that chasing length is only worthwhile if you can pull those extra words straight back to your main argument.
-If you have flexibility in your topic, or if it's one of those open-ended topics where you can pick almost anything, do your absolute best to pick a topic or thesis that you are interested in and comfortable researching/arguing about. This is of course a luxury but when you can do it, it makes the process much easier. I was in a class for my liberal arts requirement (in a program focused on art for entertainment media, especially digital, so take this for what it's worth) that used pre-Colombian Mexican and Central American history as a jumping-off point for I guess what you might call a sociology study focused on rebutting popular Eurocentric concepts of economic growth. The final project was extremely open-ended, basically any topic of social development related to Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America, so after clearing it with the teacher (this is an important step if you think you'll end up outside the box) I wrote about Mexicana and Pan Am and just generally patterns of airline development in emerging countries. Even when you're much more constrained, as I was in high school and we had a certain number of specific works of literature to draw from, consider what the teacher is looking for but also what you're best at saying.


User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1830 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1296 times:

I would meet with your professor to discuss your shortcomings in the course, and find out what you can do to improve. Furthermore, use the resources made available to you by your school (workshops, academic advising, etc.).

You can't let this F bring you down. People I go to university with consider me to be pretty damn smart, but most of them don't know I failed a couple courses in high school. I once finished with a 39 in high school calculus; I worked my ass off all summer to retake the credit so that it wouldn't affect my chances of getting into a good university. Then, when it came time to take university-level calculus, I worked extra hard, and ended up getting a 76. Sometimes things don't make sense the first time and you have to take a second shot and work a little harder.

Being a good student doesn't make you smart, and being smart doesn't make you a good student. I wouldn't just write-off that architecture class just yet, maybe give it another go.  
Quoting AR385 (Reply 1):
I once got a C

Every accounting course I've ever taken...

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 4):
If you expect to get a D, sounds like you're setting yourself up to fail somewhat.

   Forgive the brashness of this analogy: but when I played hockey (of which fighting is a common occurrence) my coach told the team to always punch the guy behind the guy you're fighting, meaning if you aim for a close target, you're only going to hit the close target. Always aim further than you think you can achieve (an A), and then strive for it so that the B is really a concession, but still a good mark.

Quoting Newark727 (Reply 8):
If you have flexibility in your topic, or if it's one of those open-ended topics where you can pick almost anything, do your absolute best to pick a topic or thesis that you are interested in and comfortable researching/arguing about. This is of course a luxury but when you can do it, it makes the process much easier.

   I took an 'Italian Civilization and Culture' class as my required humanities credit (    ), but as you mention, the final major project was extremely open-ended. Seeing that I'm a business student, I wrote a lengthy paper on the Italian economic crisis, followed by my own recommendations to resolve the mitigating factors. I got the highest mark in the class. (and then bombed the final exam, which brought my mark way down...)



Flying refined.
User currently offlineplaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1251 times:

As a college professor, teaching both undergraduate and graduate students here are a few words of wisdom:

1) If writing (composition, grammar, punctuation, citations, etc.) are difficult, connect with the available resources before you being any given course. There are staff members available to assist, but students need to reach out. It always amazes me how many times I connect students with resources for assistance and the near universal resistance to help.

2) Ask your instructors if s/he is willing to review assignments ahead of the due date and provide feedback. I always offer this to my students (and do the review's electronically using track changes so it makes it easier for both). In a given semester I might get one who will take me up on this. If you do take advantage of an offer like this, please do not send items for review within 48 hours of the deadline as it is difficult to provide useful assistance so close to the end of the process.

3) Take a look at the syllabus. One of the most challenging issues for faculty is students that do not check the guidance provided via the syllabus. I will concede that some of my faculty counterparts are less than detailed in a syllabus, so the issue does not allows sit with the student.

4) Read assignments out loud before submitting, preferably to someone not connected with the course. You can catch a fair number of writing errors this way.

5) Finally, recognize that sometimes the issue is with the faculty member and not the student. If you believe you have followed the assignment, used the resources, and still are potentially challenged, reach out to the department representative (including academic advisors) for assistance.

I'm also happy to provide assistance if you feel it would be helpful.



I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11648 posts, RR: 60
Reply 11, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1240 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 9):
I got the highest mark in the class. (and then bombed the final exam, which brought my mark way down...)

I did that once - not just year, but ever for that course (educational 1 in 5 scale model of a jet engine in detail). Then the entire exam was on a subject which the tutor said had a very slim chance of coming up, and if it did would be for one question. Thanks for my B Edexcel   

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
drew stuff knowing that I could not draw.

I think that's open to interpretation. Some of the drawings I've seen by architects leading major practices have been, well, 'iffy'!


Dan  



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11596 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1215 times:

With all of the reading and writing I was told about at the very beginning of the term, I knew I would not get an A. Having some debates on this board and having too many of my thoughts misunderstood because I didn't know how to present them already showed me that I do poorly at English composition. I thought I would do well in architecture, but knowing what it is all about with the drawing and reading and writing, I really don't think that is my thing.

I was also upset about my algebra grade. He gave me a B. I am sure it is a high B, but still a B.



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 13, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1188 times:
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Quoting seb146 (Reply 12):
Having some debates on this board and having too many of my thoughts misunderstood because I didn't know how to present them already showed me that I do poorly at English composition.

To be honest, your posts have never given me that impression.



MGGS
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2786 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (1 year 8 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1124 times:
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I feel your pain man. I had a nice 3.0 ruined by a sculpture class. I'm all for a well rounded education. But I'm going to school for commercial aviation. That did not help enhance any of my flying skills.
Blue



You push down on that yoke, the houses get bigger, you pull back on the yoke, the houses get bigger- Ken Foltz
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