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What Do You Eat For New Year´s?  
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Posted (1 year 8 months 18 hours ago) and read 1685 times:
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Reading the other thread about what you eat for Chirstmas it would be fun to know about the different food for New year´s in your country/city/state.

Here in Mexico:

Tamales (We always have tamales) Pork, chicken beef, and beans
Bacalo (Codfish, with tomato sauce and olives)
Seafood (Mostly a smorgasbord of assorted shellfish)
Romeritos (A plant with edible foliage, prepared with Mole and shrimp, then put between two baguette style breads)
Spanish Tortilla with lobster
Cinammon Rice Pudding


MGGS
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineplanejamie From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2011, 576 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 18 hours ago) and read 1674 times:

A salad. Since I'm dieting like crazy.

User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6607 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 17 hours ago) and read 1648 times:

I'm in Italy with my Italian-French family so it will be a mix of both cultures' foods. Starting with foie gras, smoked salmon and various appetizers, along with campari, sauternes, spumante. Then 2 ducks that an aunt raised on her farm (where we eat), with marrons, and lentils, accompanied by chianti. Then all kinds of cheeses with salad, brie, parmesan, several goat cheeses. As a desert pandoro, panettone, marrons glacés, panforte, along with asti and champagne.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineAF1624 From France, joined Jul 2006, 658 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 17 hours ago) and read 1641 times:

I've just had:

Blini with salmon eggs and some kind of sauce that goes with it

then

Salmon & cream cheese bagel

then

Foie gras with Porto confit

All of this with Ruinart Blanc de Blanc champagne.

Life is good.



Cheers
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1559 times:

Quoting AR385 (Thread starter):
Reading the other thread about what you eat for Chirstmas it would be fun to know about the different food for New year´s in your country/city/state.

AR...........It's a huge coincidence that you should ask ! My new bride just informed me (a couple of days ago) that we were going to "Fallen Rock" for New Years Eve, and that it was to be a "pot luck" affair; First, Fallen Rock is a beautiful little camp ground about six miles away, and was owned for 12 or 14 years by some folks named Davy and Marcie Blyestone. Until about 2 years ago, we used to go there every Saturday night, as they had this "group" of "country" musicians that all get together every Sat. night and play there. (I'm not much "into" country music, but knowing all of the participants, I always went because it was just fun, hanging out with friends ); anyway, Davy had some health problems, and they sold the camp grounds to some other people, several months ago; inasmuch as I hadn't met the "new people", I decided to go, just out of curiosity; (I'm glad I did !)

Second........for those not familiar with U.S. "culture"..........a "pot luck" is a euphemism for "an informal get-together among friends, where everyone "brings" some of the food.

As a general rule, the extent of my "food preparation" is re-heating some ham left over from Christmas,  and making myself a couple of ham sandwiches , (which I just finished)

But for the "pot luck", my new bride explained that WE were bringing meat balls, deviled eggs, some ridiculous little (I hesitate to describe these things..),........first, she brought home this minuscule "loaf" of rye bread, each "slice" being about 2 inches square; then she mixes up all of these "things" in a bowl, one package of creamed cheese, mixed up with one package of some sort of Italian "dressing"; then........my job was to "smear" about a tea-spoon full of this "stuff" on each dinky little slice of rye bread, THEN she slices up this huge, longish English cucumber, places one big slice atop each rye bread with "stuff" on it; actually, the the "stuff" wasn't bad, but I abhor cucumbers, English or otherwise ! But I dutifully did as I was instructed.

My next big task was to "do" the deviled eggs; I've always LOVED deviled eggs ! In this case, she had purchased two dozen extra large chicken eggs, and boiled them; after they had cooled off from the boiling, my task was to remove all of the shells, which actually proved to be a laborious, two hour task; then slice each egg "in two" lengthwise, and remove the yolks intact, place them all in a large mixing bowl, and mash them up until there are no "lumps"; at that point, i / we put spoons full of mayonnaise into the bowl, followed by lesser amount of French's mustard, a little hot sauce, and stir it all up for a bit; then......after placing all of the "empty" boiled egg whites in a pie carrier, you add maybe a teaspoon of the "stirred-up-stuff" into each egg, and sprinkle some powered dill leaves onto the "stuff" (mainly just for decorative effect, but you can taste it; ) making the deviled eggs was not hard, (after removing all of the egg shells that is), but is is very "labor intensive"; (worth every minute though, as the things ARE delicious ! )

We get to Fallen Rock, and I met the "new owners"; He; a really BIG guy, (a brute actually, but VERY friendly, very nice !
She; made the whole effort worthwhile ! At my age, and after being married just a week, I very rarely see a lady that causes my male testosterone to "become evident" ! The new owner's wife did just that ! Tallish, very nicely built, on the slenderish side, fabulous face / hair / and facial expressions; the outstanding thing though, was when she moved ! Like a cat.....so "fluidly", so effortlessly, and she even went nuts over the deviled eggs and the meatballs ! It was a fun evening, and I'm glad we went; (I just HOPE there were no "mind-readers" among the guests !

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineluckyone From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 2168 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1547 times:

Growing up in the South my family always ate some variation of the following:

Pork (usually a loan or roast)
Greens (my mother preferred turnip greens, my father and I prefer collards)
Black eyed peas
Rice (they cook white rice, I usually cook hoppin' johns because I'm not a fan of plain rice)


User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4990 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1545 times:

I start the day out with leftover Christmas pudding fried in butter and champagne to drink.

Usually I have some kind of Chinese food on New Years day. This year it will be vegetable Egg Foo Young with white rice.

Been doing this for the past 10 years or so.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6088 posts, RR: 29
Reply 7, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1527 times:
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Quoting AR385 (Thread starter):
it would be fun to know about the different food for New year´s in your country/city/state.

My family and I always have pork on New Years. This year mom made a pork pie. We got turned on to these on a trip to England this past summer. It turned out great and we never made one before.

We had to modify the recipe a bit because mom didn't have the correct sized pan. This one is bigger than what the recipe is for; at 9 inches with 2.5 pounds of ground pork and 12oz of streaky bacon ( or regular bacon as we Americans call it ).



http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb309/NWA747/Porkpie020.jpg

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb309/NWA747/Porkpierecipe.jpg



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlinesignol From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2007, 3003 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1488 times:

Turkey curry, usually the last bit of Christmas day leftovers  

signol



Flights booked: none :(
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5400 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1485 times:

We host a party every year. We always vary the menu and rarely go traditional.

Let's see, this year:

A honey-baked ham
A slow cooked beef brisket with mushrooms
Roasted red potatoes
Mac & cheese
Green bean casserole
Sweet bread
Stuffed mushrooms
Various alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks
Various cookies and cakes and pies
A Greek Salad and a "standard salad"
A tart pasta salad that I need to get the recipe for

No seafood this year...pity.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1332 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1466 times:

The starter was a plate with tuna mousse, smoked salmon with spinach sauce, freshly baked bread and a salad with greens, cherry tomatoes and avocado. First main course was beef stroganoff (from sirloin, of course) with mashed potatoes. Second was a roast of tenderloin with filled baked potatoes, sauce bernaise and green asparagus wrapped in Italian ham. Dessert was 3 home made cakes with an assortment of berries and ice cream.

We had a 2001 Californian Chardonnay with the starter, a 1987 Bordeaux with the mains and a 2006 Sancerre with the desserts. Unless, of course, one chose to stay with the bubblies, which quite a few of us did. They were 2003 Dom Perignon.

Didn't do my diet any good, but it is nice to have friends who both enjoy and are skilled in the art of making wonderful food.



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlineLO231 From Belgium, joined Sep 2004, 2392 posts, RR: 23
Reply 11, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1421 times:

Appetizer liqueur d'Anvers

Scampis (tiger shrimps in beer sauce)

Belgian wit-blauw steak with fries and cress and beer sauce

Sourbet with strawberry beer

Simple, but oh so nice!!! Thanks, Tony!



Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 12, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1419 times:
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Quoting Geezer (Reply 4):
my task was to remove all of the shells, which actually proved to be a laborious, two hour task; then slice each egg "in two" lengthwise, and remove the yolks intact, place them all in a large mixing bowl, and mash them up until there are no "lumps"; at that point, i / we put spoons full of mayonnaise into the bowl, followed by lesser amount of French's mustard, a little hot sauce, and stir it all up for a bit; then......after placing all of the "empty" boiled egg whites in a pie carrier, you add maybe a teaspoon of the "stirred-up-stuff" into each egg, and sprinkle some powered dill leaves onto the "stuff" (mainly just for decorative effect, but you can taste it; ) making the deviled eggs was not hard, (after removing all of the egg shells that is), but is is very "labor intensive"; (worth every minute though, as the things ARE delicious ! )

I love deviled eggs. I´m going to incorporate that recipe. The way we do them is the same, more or less, but we add Paprika, Tabasco sauce and Worcestershire sauce to the mix.

Quoting falstaff (Reply 7):
This year mom made a pork pie. We got turned on to these on a trip to England this past summer. It turned out great and we never made one before.

We´ll try this, thank you for providing the recipe.

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 9):
A slow cooked beef brisket with mushrooms

That one brings memories. My Texas side of the family would always have a brisket for New Year´s.

Thank you all for sharing. I love food.



MGGS
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14003 posts, RR: 62
Reply 13, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1413 times:

In Germany traditionally it is a carp in many regions, and "Berliner Pfannkuchen" (a kind of sweet bun made out of doughnout dough and fried in similar manner, but filled withz jam) are also quite common.

In the Philippines it is common to eat something with long noodles like Pancit or spaghetti to symbolised long life.

Pancit Bihon (there exist many other variations, with different types of noodles, seafood, meat etc.):



Jan

[Edited 2013-01-02 23:18:36]

User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8133 posts, RR: 26
Reply 14, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 1413 times:

My GF was with family so I spent NYE/NYD in Kyoto with some friends. Since portions run small over here, we were basically eating the whole time.

Started with sashimi - we had already bought some at the market but things got better when my friend's landlords came over and dropped off a big yellowtail fresh out of the freezer box which we cut up like so.

http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/574907_2731173255659_1216411413_n.jpg

Then we made a traditional new year dish, chikuzen-ni - steamed chicken with taro and other vergetables in a broth made from sake and mirin:

http://sphotos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/544061_2731173695670_2080562879_n.jpg

Then we went to the temple around midnight, where old women were handing out hot sake and all kinds of otsumami - dried squid, dried fruit, mixed nuts, etc. This standing around in the cold, eating and drinking by a big fire continued until about 1:30 am. We got up late the next day, grilled the leftover yellowtail to make fish sandwiches, and it started all over again.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
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