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How Is Nokia Lumia 820/920 Doing?  
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Posted (1 year 8 months 10 hours ago) and read 4313 times:

How is Nokia Lumia 820/920 doing? Will this save Nokia or even bring it back to number 1?

I tried 920 (my friend is using it) and it's a very good phone. Dual core, multi-tasking, great camera etc

42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineManuCH From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 3011 posts, RR: 47
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 3 hours ago) and read 4244 times:
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I think it's indeed a very good phone, and it could be the last chance Nokia has to save its guts.

The problem I see is the lack of support for the Windows Phone OS by major developers. Now that even Google bailed out ("we won't publish our apps for Windows Phone until there's a solid user base"), it becomes even harder. Microsoft is doing what it can to attract developers left and right, but that's no easy task.

As far as I'm personally concerned, the lack of Google apps would be a bit of a show-stopper for me. I'm currently using an iPhone in an all-Apple ecosystem, and switching to a Lumia 820/920 would be really difficult for me. I'm sure others can relate.

Users who don't have all their data so tightly-knit into a specific system may have an easier time doing so, but without good support for calendar/email/etc sync and apps, high-end users are unlikely to switch. I think they're having a hard time finding early adopters. The "geek crowd" is snobbing the phone, and there's hardly any buzz going on.

I still hope for the best, as Nokias were all my first phones, and it would be sad to see them go under.



Never trust a statistic you didn't fake yourself
User currently offlineMarkusMUC From Germany, joined Jun 2010, 15 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 2 hours ago) and read 4229 times:

I've got a Lumia 820 for one month and I'm satisfied so far.

Sure, Windows Phone is not the best and there are not so much apps like for iPhone or Android. However, the major apps are available. Yes, Google apps are not available yet. Currently I don't miss them. Bing is okay and Nokia maps is quite good.

Actually I looked for an iPhone 5. However, I'm deeply disappointed by it. iPhone maps - don't work. WLAN internet connections - don't work without problems. And the iPhone 5 has only 1 out of 5 LTE frequencies. - For that money, no way!!

In the point of fast internet and phone/internet connections the Nokia Lumia 820/920 beats the iPhone 5 in very case.


An Android mobile phone wasn't an option for me. I don't like Android. Android is too open in my view.


User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 1 hour ago) and read 4208 times:

I've got the HTC 8X, the "other" (According to Nokia) Windows Phone 8 flagship. It's great. WP8 is very good, better than iOS6, hands down, but not quite as good as Android 4.2 (For me, anyway). When i was in Thailand recently i saw lots of people sporting the Lumia 920, which i really didn't expect.

I hope WP does well, but the problem is developers being too lazy to bother making a WP app.

If HTC/Nokia could make hardware like they do for Windows Phone and put pure AOSP Android 4.2 on it, it would be the perfect device.


User currently onlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12448 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4176 times:

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 3):
I hope WP does well, but the problem is developers being too lazy to bother making a WP app.

And I suppose you are too lazy to pull the engine out of your car and replace it with one of a different make and manufacture.

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 3):
If HTC/Nokia could make hardware like they do for Windows Phone

I wasn't too impressed with the HTC hardware I carried around for the last two years.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4164 times:

Some pundits have labeled the Lumia (as well as WP8) a flop. The lack of apps has definitely been a sticking point, as many developers would rather devote their efforts to platforms that have significant marketshares as that's where the money is. Windows Phone is not the only mobile platform Google has discontinued apps and support on, as they've done a similar thing with BlackBerry in recent months as well. Without native Google apps, that puts a device and OS at a disadvantage. At least with BlackBerry's tablet OS (from which the upcoming BB10 OS is derived from), there is an Android player and a number of folks have taken Google apps for Android and converted the file so it can run on the PlayBook via the Android player. RIM is actively courting those with Android apps to convert them for BB10 since the OS will have the same Android player that the PlayBook OS currently has. Microsoft doesn't have such an ability.

There's been a lot of money spent promoting WP8 in ads that also feature the Lumia (I drive past at least 6 billboards a day in the Atlanta area promoting WP8). They're brought in celebrities like Gwen Stefani, Jessica Alba, Cam Newton, and even characters from The Hobbit to promote the product and that really hasn't seemed to help sales.

Nokia in places like the US have been relegated to also ran status despite once being a dominant player in the cell phone market (A decade or so ago, their phones were the most widely sold phones in the world.) and partnering with Microsoft is something that both companies needed to do to try to stay relevant in the mobile device market that is dominated in most countries by iOS and Android devices. While in countries like India and in emerging markets in Asia and Africa, Nokia and RIM have remained or become the dominate phones because their devices work better on the existing cell phone infrastructure in those countries than the iPhone and Android devices (4G and even 3G service is not widely available even within major ciries and the cell networks outside of major cities are 2G).


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4146 times:

Quoting srbmod (Reply 5):
Some pundits have labeled the Lumia (as well as WP8) a flop.

Doesn't surprise me, as "some pundits" had labelled it a flop (and WP8) 6 months ago, when they had no access to it - it seems to be the "party line" for some pundits...

Quoting srbmod (Reply 5):
The lack of apps has definitely been a sticking point

Yes, fully agree here, app offerings are anaemic.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 5):
as many developers would rather devote their efforts to platforms that have significant marketshares as that's where the money is

Again, agreed. But its worth noting that with WP8, the "cost of platform support" decreases dramatically because WP8 apps can be ported to Win8 Metro with little to no effort involved, unlike WP7 which was a standalone platform.

Expect to see the benefits of that in 2013.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 5):
Without native Google apps, that puts a device and OS at a disadvantage.

I disagree here - Google were withholding turn-by-turn navigation on iOS, but offering it for free on Android, so there were disadvantages anyway.

The Lumia series comes with the Nokia app suite, which is head and shoulders above that of the Google suite available - free turn by turn, with downloadable maps etc etc. The only issue I have with the Nokia maps app is the quality of the satellite images, which Google has better versions of.

Google have also turned off ActiveSync on Gmail for non-Android devices (surely theres some antitrust issue there?), which has its repurcussions...

I switched from the iPhone4S to the 920 at the start of December, and to be frank I've not yet regretted it.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 5):
Microsoft doesn't have such an ability.

Microsoft doesn't want such an ability because thats precisely how they killed O/S 2 back in the day (O/S 2 had both native and Windows NT app support - guess which won?)- why write native apps if you can target Android and have your app run anyway? And when Android development moves on? Well, BB10 will be at a disadvantage - and all of a sudden you have a user base which is hooked on Android apps, so why not go with an Android when they next refresh their device?

To return to the topic thread - I'm loving my 920 - its fast, responsive, huge screen, decent quality, built like an iPhone (many Android phones suffer from plastic-itis where they just feel like component parts loosly held together, and an iPhone has always felt like it was hewn from a single block of granite - the 920 is much more like the iphone and thus has a inherent quality feel to it).

I've not really had any issues migrating either - I used Requiem to strip the DRM from my iTunes library (mainly books and music), and everything else just worked. I got a free wireless charger as well, so that helps a lot.

The apps I use seem polished and well designed, and I can directly compare several between iPhone, Android and WP8 (Flixster for example - first used it on the iPhone, then used it on Android, now I use it on WP8 - the iPhone version is the one I use as a base line, the Android version was very poor, but the WP8 version exceeds the iPhone version in quality and ability).

I would love more apps, but after careful consideration prior to actually taking the plunge, I decided that the apps I actually used could be replaced with equal or better ones.


User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4133 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 6):
Google have also turned off ActiveSync on Gmail for non-Android devices (surely theres some antitrust issue there?), which has its repurcussions...

BlackBerry is among those affected, and while I didn't use it, a lot of folks did. Google tries to portray itself as being unlike the other guys yet does some of the same type of stuff.

Quoting moo (Reply 6):
Microsoft doesn't want such an ability because thats precisely how they killed O/S 2 back in the day (O/S 2 had both native and Windows NT app support - guess which won?)- why write native apps if you can target Android and have your app run anyway? And when Android development moves on? Well, BB10 will be at a disadvantage - and all of a sudden you have a user base which is hooked on Android apps, so why not go with an Android when they next refresh their device?

RIM views it more as a gateway to get app developers to develop for the platform by making it easy to port their Android apps to run on BB10 and to get them to develop BB10 apps down the road. Right now there thousands upon thousands of unofficial Android apps that are installed on BlackBerry PlayBooks that are not officially supported by RIM or the app developers so that whenever the new version comes out, a person has to remove the older version they have sideloaded and sideload the newest version of the app that someone has converted. The problem is that the newest version may not function correctly or not function at all due to the coding of the app. RIM is trying to remedy that by having those developers onboard with them in order to make it easier on all parties. This means no more sideloaded apps that are essentially pirated apps (even though the apps in question are free and the converting/sideloading community tries to avoid paid apps). If RIM wanted to put Android on the BlackBerry, they would have never bought QNX.

Microsoft is the dominant company when it comes to the PC market and while there are other options out there, they still reign supreme as the other options are either open source operating systems that don't always translate well with typical consumer needs or is a closed operating system that is proprietary to one company's computers. Much like how Android has become the dominant smartphone OS, Windows became the dominant PC operating system. Microsoft has tried to get into the mobile device market with varying levels of success, but in the mobile device market, Windows is a minor player in the overall market and Nokia dumping their niche OS to go to WP8 is a step that both parties needed to take as while both companies have name recognition, they both weren't doing too well in the current mobile environment.

WP8 and BB10 have the risk of being another Palm OS/WebOS as the markets have changed and even if you adapt to the market, you really have to have the wow factor to get folks to switch to your device.


User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4130 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
And I suppose you are too lazy to pull the engine out of your car and replace it with one of a different make and manufacture.

It's easier for developers to make WP apps than Android or iOS apps. Microsoft do most of it for you. Developers say they won't make WP apps until more people take up the platform, yet no-one is picking up the platform because developers aren't making good apps.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 4):
I wasn't too impressed with the HTC hardware I carried around for the last two years.

I take it you aren't familiar with recent HTC Hardware then. Ever since the One X (March 2012) HTC have made great hardware, beautiful designs and strong. Compared to the flimsy iPhone series, HTC devices are built brilliantly.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 7):
you really have to have the wow factor to get folks to switch to your device.

There is MUCH more wow factor in the Lumia 920 than the iPhone 5 for instance. Apple is adding things that have been present in Android for years and labelling it as "revolutionary", whilst Nokia is really developing new things that are incredibly useful, like OIS, Pureview camera technology, Puremotion screens, Supersensitive displays etc.


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4124 times:

Quoting srbmod (Reply 7):
RIM views it more as a gateway to get app developers to develop for the platform by making it easy to port their Android apps to run on BB10 and to get them to develop BB10 apps down the road.

Ain't eeeeeever going to happen - the Dalvik and BB development environments, while both based on Java, are worlds apart.

BB would be better providing a much better developer experience, as its currently very very very very very very poor.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 7):
If RIM wanted to put Android on the BlackBerry, they would have never bought QNX.

But the problem is, by allowing Android apps to run natively on their platform, they are literally giving control of their platform away to a third party - they no longer control functionality or compatibility, its all down to Google and the other Open Handset Alliance members who control Dalvik...

Thats the danger. And its a bigger danger than "hey look, now Android apps work here too!" is a benefit.

RIM is currently in the floundering stage of major corporate issues - they either get their stuff together quickly (and taking a year getting BB10 out the door does not bode well), or they lose their offices.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 7):
Much like how Android has become the dominant smartphone OS

There are plenty of caveats with statements like those - I do not dispute that Android has the biggest market share, but if you look at their actual market spread the majority of Android devices are the type of device which is steadily replacing the bottom of the market Nokia et al - the type of device that someone who doesn't really care what they get so long as it makes calls, gets.

Apple are the ones in the better position, as they have a smaller market device share but a hugely dominant market profit share - Apple don't care about the bottom end of the market, which is why Android is thriving there, almost by default.

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 8):
I take it you aren't familiar with recent HTC Hardware then. Ever since the One X (March 2012) HTC have made great hardware, beautiful designs and strong. Compared to the flimsy iPhone series, HTC devices are built brilliantly.

I heavily dispute this - during 2011 I had several HTC devices, from the middle of the range to the top of the range, and all sucked badly in the build quality. Plasticy, creaky, bendable, and just plain cheap.

The iPhone has always been the better build quality.


User currently offlineplanejamie From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2011, 576 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4122 times:

I personally went from Windows Phone to an iPhone 5. If I'm honest, the iPhone isn't perfect (I'm using Google Maps instead of Apple Maps) but it's far better than Windows Phone for me.

In hindsight I wish I'd waited for the new Google Nexus


User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2078 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4115 times:

It's too expensive, isn't it? The high-cost market is already cornered by Apple. Android's strength is to provide options at pretty much all price ranges. I think Windows Phone would stand a chance if it was offered at a lower price, but right now... why would I spend 600+ Euros for a phone if I could get an iPhone for that price?


Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4103 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 9):

I heavily dispute this - during 2011 I had several HTC devices, from the middle of the range to the top of the range, and all sucked badly in the build quality. Plasticy, creaky, bendable, and just plain cheap.

The iPhone has always been the better build quality.

"Ever since the One X (March 2012) HTC have made great hardware" I take it you didn't read that part. During 2011 i agree, but i specifically said March 2012 onwards. The iPhone had never been good build quality, everyone i've known to own an iPhone has at some point broken the screen or the back.

Quoting Rara (Reply 11):
why would I spend 600+ Euros for a phone if I could get an iPhone for that price?

Because a Lumia 920 can do way more than an iPhone 5? People buy iPhone's because they are made by Apple and are called iPhone's. That's it. You ask the vast majority of iPhone users what OS their phone is running and they wouldn't have a clue, heck, most of them don't even know WHICH iPhone version they own!


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4093 times:

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 12):

My apologies, I had missed that - however, broken screens and backs have nothing to do with build quality (and I take it you haven't seen the break ability demos done by someone in Singapore I think, where he conducts drop tests - the iPhone comes out on top in most if the tests).

The 920 is the first phone I've handled which comes close to the iPhone on actual build quality - even the Samsung SIII seems tacky.


User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4090 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 13):
the iPhone comes out on top in most if the tests

The iPhone 5, yes, but all previous have been awful in this area. The Lumia 920 can take a right good beating!

The S3 is actually very resistant to breaking, don't let the plastic deceive you. I've dropped mine many a time and it's not even got a scratch. My Nexus 4 on the other hand shattered and the screen became totally unresponsive after one drop. I guess that is why it is so cheap!


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4086 times:

Actually, the comparison I saw was 4S and S3, with the S3 coming off worse...

User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1830 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4081 times:

I've been given demos of the new OS on multiple occasions, but I haven't had a chance to actually get my hands on the Lumia hardware. But from what I've seen, it's an attractive and sleek device. I can't really comment on if I think it will result in a resurgence of Nokia since I haven't used it, but it appears much better than any of their past products.

Quoting srbmod (Reply 7):
If RIM wanted to put Android on the BlackBerry, they would have never bought QNX.

  

Quoting moo (Reply 9):
Ain't eeeeeever going to happen - the Dalvik and BB development environments, while both based on Java, are worlds apart.

BB would be better providing a much better developer experience, as its currently very very very very very very poor.

Have you used the new developing environment/SDK for BB10? I'm not a developer, but I worked closely with Developer Relations at RIM, and from what I heard, it's miles better than the one used for BB7.

Quoting moo (Reply 9):
But the problem is, by allowing Android apps to run natively on their platform, they are literally giving control of their platform away to a third party - they no longer control functionality or compatibility, its all down to Google and the other Open Handset Alliance members who control Dalvik...

Thats the danger. And its a bigger danger than "hey look, now Android apps work here too!" is a benefit.

I'm not sure how you came to that conclusion. Core apps on the device are still BB developed, all they've done is open a door via Android Player so that the user has more options, but in no way have they "[given] up control of their platform". If the Android developer base decides to not port over their apps to the BB platform, then only BlackBerry developed apps will work on the device...like it has been for as long as apps have been on BB devices. It would of course be a crushing blow to the consumer side of the business if the Android Player were to be a failure though.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4075 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 16):
Have you used the new developing environment/SDK for BB10? I'm not a developer, but I worked closely with Developer Relations at RIM, and from what I heard, it's miles better than the one used for BB7.

Yes, 6 months now, and it's still significantly sub par when compared with the development ecosystems for iOS and WP, and even below that of the Android environments.

And let's remember that BB10 will be a minority in the BB world for quite a while to come.

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 16):
I'm not sure how you came to that conclusion.

The moment a developer says "I don't need to port to BB, they can just run the Android app", my point is validated. And that's going to happen quite quickly.

You can talk all you want about the core apps, but no one interested in an app ecosystem is going to care about them - iOS, WP, Android all come with core apps, but the key is apps supplied by third parties.

BB are now tracking two development environments - the BB Java one, controlled by BB themselves, and the Android one, controlled by a competitor. BB cannot control what happens to the Android ecosystem in the future, they can only control how quickly their compatibility layer tracks the official version. Once they fall behind, and the Android ecosystem moves on and becomes incompatible, you are going to have some very unhappy customers n your hands, and you've already built the foundation for those customers moving to the Android platform outright...


User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4058 times:

Quoting moo (Reply 17):

The moment a developer says "I don't need to port to BB, they can just run the Android app", my point is validated. And that's going to happen quite quickly.

Incorrect. One cannot simply download an Android app from Google Play and sideload onto their PlayBook. One can convert the file to run on the PlayBook via sideloading, but there is no official support for the app from either side (RIM or the app developer). By utilizing the tools RIM is offering, it benefits not only the developer and RIM, it also benefits the end-user, as they get the app through the official channels as opposed from some other site. Consumers get official support and when an app has been updated, it can be updated through official channels instead of having to have someone convert the file to run on the PlayBook and then having to sideload it.

The converting and sideloading of Android apps onto the PlayBook is a bit of a sticky issue and at one point, it was rumored that RIM was going to lockout the ability to sideload apps. Let's just say that didn't sit well with a lot of folks. In some cases, RIM had nobody but themselves to blame as companies were not going to release multiple versions of their apps for the BlackBerry as you had the older OS5/6 as well as OS7 and the PlayBook OS. A lot of PlayBook apps in recent months have been ports of Android apps. So there is definitely developers willing to port their apps to the PlayBook.


User currently offlineAirPacific747 From Denmark, joined May 2008, 2389 posts, RR: 21
Reply 19, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4039 times:

I've owned the Lumia 920 for over a month now and very satisfied. The phone feels very premium. I still need a few apps but nothing important is missing. I've embraced the MS ecosystem and have now a backup of everything in SkyDrive. Now I am seriously considering selling my iPad 3 and getting a MS Surface tablet. Or at least getting a Surface tablet and see if I will miss the iPad, and if not, then sell the iPad  

I've tried Windows 8 on my laptop and in the beginning I didn't like it very much. Now I really like it, and looking forward to trying the OS with a touch screen.

I've had many Android phones in the past and I just don't understand why Google's market share is so big. The last Android phone I had was an SGS3. While a very nice phone, the software just isn't very good in my humble opinion. Even when you buy the phone without contract as I did, it comes preloaded with tons of bloatware which adds to a very confusing user experience even for tech savvy people. Also, when comparing Google Play with MS Marketplace, the graphics on Google Play looks like a polished DOS application while the Marketplace on WP is much much sleeker.

I guess Android is only that much in the lead because there are so many cheap phones using Android. I like the customization abilities in Android though, but maybe just slightly too nerdy for my taste.

iPhone 5 looks very attractive. My girlfriend has the white one, but I think I would get bored too fast.

[Edited 2013-01-01 14:28:31]

User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4038 times:

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 19):

The Surface is incredible. I don't use my iPad at all (Apart from playing Infinite Flight) anymore. It's only problem is the same as Windows Phone really, quality of apps.


User currently offlineAirPacific747 From Denmark, joined May 2008, 2389 posts, RR: 21
Reply 21, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4031 times:

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 20):

The Surface is incredible. I don't use my iPad at all (Apart from playing Infinite Flight) anymore. It's only problem is the same as Windows Phone really, quality of apps.

I agree. I am actually surprised that it has taken that long for MS to build up a solid collection of the best known apps. Anyway, I am sure that now that WP8 and W8 share the same platform, it will speed up the process.


User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4007 times:

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 19):

I guess Android is only that much in the lead because there are so many cheap phones using Android. I like the customization abilities in Android though, but maybe just slightly too nerdy for my taste.

There's a lot of cheap Android devices period. There are stores selling no-name Android powered tablets with a couple of GB of memory for $49-$79 and they're using older builds of Android and the quality is pretty bad as the internals are practically the bare minimums needed to run the OS. That tends to dilute the entire Android brand.

Android came about because there was not any smartphone OS that could be licensed, as RIM wasn't going to license the BlackBerry OS nor was Apple going to license iOS. While there were attempts at other operating systems, they didn't have Google backing them, which was huge. Had Google not backed Android, they too might have been another also ran in the mobile OS field. The fact that it is open source and easily customizable definitely plays into its' success.

Ironically, folks at Nokia as well as Microsoft were skeptical of Android when it was released back in 2007 and didn't view as a threat or that it wasn't going to amount to much.

http://www.engadget.com/2007/11/05/s...d-apple-downplay-android-relevance


User currently offlineTLG From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 370 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3987 times:

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 19):
I guess Android is only that much in the lead because there are so many cheap phones using Android.

That's true; low end Androids certainly inflate the marketshare numbers. However, the Samsung GS3 was the top selling smartphone in Q3 2012. This proved that low end Androids are not the only reason their numbers are big. But in my opinion, it was not until Android's Jelly Bean was released that the OS caught up with (and arguably surpassed) iOS.

I used a Lumia WP7 for awhile recently. I had no issues with the WP OS; my biggest complaint was that I felt handcuffed by not having apps available that I was used to using. My opinion is that MS is going to have to take the initiative in getting popular apps to market. Some of the ones I use that were available on WP7 were of poor quality compared to Android's.


User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3932 times:

Quoting TLG (Reply 23):
it was not until Android's Jelly Bean was released that the OS caught up with (and arguably surpassed) iOS.

Definitely surpassed it in my opinion. I love Android because you have choice. There are 3 maybe 4 top of the line Android handsets from different OEM's that blow away the iPhone and are usually cheaper too. SGS3/Note2, HTCOneX+/Droid DNA, LG Nexus 4 etc.


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 25, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3959 times:

Quoting srbmod (Reply 18):
One cannot simply download an Android app from Google Play and sideload onto their PlayBook.

I know that, and it has no bearing on my point - BB supply the Java Android Runtime, which simply requires a compatibility check and a repackage to "port" your Android app to BB10.

And thats my point - any developer using that approach isn't developing for Blackberry, they are developing for Android and "making do" on Blackberry... and Blackberry have lost one developer.

And once you have developers doing that, Blackberry no longer control their own development environment and are beholden to whatever direction Google takes Android in.


User currently onlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12448 posts, RR: 25
Reply 26, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 3905 times:

(Note: something went wrong with my posting below, but don't have the time to fix it. I think the key points are still visible...)

Thanks, moo, for your post. Seems you work with a lot of this stuff, so have a lot of insights I don't have.

Quoting moo,reply=9 But the problem is, by allowing Android apps to run natively on their platform, they are literally giving control of their platform away to a third party - they no longer control functionality or compatibility, its all down to Google and the other Open Handset Alliance members who control Dalvik...[/quote]

Not sure what they can do. Seems RIM's "killer app" is their enterprise secure messaging technology, yet end users don't want to carry a seperate RIM device to get that nor do they want to live solely within the RIM ecosystem. One relative of mine works for the government so he carries a RIM device when he's on-call or at work, but also carries an iPhone because of its richer set of apps. He's told me he'd gladly dump the RIM and that's the direction his agency is moving.

[quote=moo
(Reply 9):
RIM is currently in the floundering stage of major corporate issues - they either get their stuff together quickly (and taking a year getting BB10 out the door does not bode well), or they lose their offices.

Seems that way to me too. Nokia is not quite there, but seems to be heading there too.

Quoting moo (Reply 9):
There are plenty of caveats with statements like those - I do not dispute that Android has the biggest market share, but if you look at their actual market spread the majority of Android devices are the type of device which is steadily replacing the bottom of the market Nokia et al - the type of device that someone who doesn't really care what they get so long as it makes calls, gets.

Apple are the ones in the better position, as they have a smaller market device share but a hugely dominant market profit share - Apple don't care about the bottom end of the market, which is why Android is thriving there, almost by default.

Seems that's what we were saying about Appls vs M$ in the 80s/90s, yet back then it was M$ with the huge lower end market share and Apple with the smaller but high end share. Seems Apple is just recently at the tipping point in terms of smartphones shipped, and seems they are happy with the strategy of favoring profit over market share.

Seems the problem with that strategy is that they have to keep ahead in the innovation race to keep the profit share they want, and that's a very hard thing to do.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineHoMsaR From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 1176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 27, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 3926 times:

Got a question, and I might as well ask it here rather than starting a new thread (since we already have 300 different smartphone comparison threads).

I will be getting a new phone in about three months, and am trying to decide between WP8, iP5, and an Android something-or-other (no desire to bother with Blackberry, so don't suggest it).

I'm one of the only people on earth to have actually liked the old Windows Mobile 6.0 OS, because it was very simple. However, there were very few apps for it. Normally, I don't need that many apps (not big on games).

Anyway, onto my questions.

First, what's the battery life of the Nokia 920 (or other WP8 devices for that matter)? My old Windows phones could easily go through a day of use and wind up with 50%+ battery life remaining. If I was good, I could go two days without a charge. My current Android (LG Optimus S) sucks for battery life (too much crap running in the background that I can't kill). I've often come close to running out of battery before I even get home for the day.

Second, do these phones come with crap pre-installed by the carrier? That's one of my big problems with my current phone, and I'm actually thinking (whatever I go with) of buying a phone independent of any carrier, and just getting the service separately. If they do come with that kind of junk, how easy is it to remove it?

Third, how customizable is the home screen interface? I realize that I could just go with Android if I wanted customization, but I'm curious about what one can do with the current Windows offerings.

Fourth, back when I used Windows Mobile 6 (with two different carriers, AT&T and Verizon), having GPS enabled on your maps was actually an extra charge for some reason. Is this still the case, or can you actually use GPS to track your location for free now?

Are there any good syncing options between Google Calendar and WP8 apps (either native, or downloadable add-ons)?

Other than a few minutes browsing around a Microsoft store (seriously, the place looked almost exactly like an Apple store, right down to the name tags hanging around the employees' necks shaped like little phones), I have zero experience using Windows Phone 8, so I don't know what to expect. I understand that, for now, the apps are limited, and I'll just have to take my chances on that one.

Also, I know this is a bit subjective, but what is typing like on the Nokia 920? I'm pretty good at typing on my iPod Touch, but my Optimus is just a real PITA with regards to typing (and swype is annoying as all hell, though typing letter-by-letter is even worse).

I might have other questions, but that's it for now. Hopefully some of those on here who have used these phones can give me some insight.

It's really a tough decision for me.



I was raised by a cup of coffee.
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5514 posts, RR: 8
Reply 28, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 3911 times:

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
I will be getting a new phone in about three months, and am trying to decide between WP8, iP5, and an Android something-or-other (no desire to bother with Blackberry, so don't suggest it).

I'm one of the only people on earth to have actually liked the old Windows Mobile 6.0 OS, because it was very simple. However, there were very few apps for it. Normally, I don't need that many apps (not big on games).

Hi HoMsaR, I am probably one of the bigger fans and advocates of WP (7.X for me right now). Of course it is always what fits yours needs best but we have the Lumia 900 and even with the limits of WP7.5 the phone and the Windows Phone system have been so far excellent. I really like the fact that it is controlled more than Android and is not trying to clone iOS/Apple.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
First, what's the battery life of the Nokia 920 (or other WP8 devices for that matter)? My old Windows phones could easily go through a day of use and wind up with 50%+ battery life remaining. If I was good, I could go two days without a charge. My current Android (LG Optimus S) sucks for battery life (too much crap running in the background that I can't kill). I've often come close to running out of battery before I even get home for the day.

I can only note that for the 900 we can eat up the charge in a day with heavy use. When we recently went to Disneyland and my wife was posting to FB all day and taking pictures and texting and checking out stuff online and calling etc. we ran low in the last hour at the park. I will say the phone has an excellent battery management system though and will go into a "battery save" mode if you wish. Normally though we just charge the phone everyday to every other day with no problem.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Second, do these phones come with crap pre-installed by the carrier? That's one of my big problems with my current phone, and I'm actually thinking (whatever I go with) of buying a phone independent of any carrier, and just getting the service separately. If they do come with that kind of junk, how easy is it to remove it?

Yes, the AT&T 900 came preinstalled with a bunch of AT&T stuff but the great thing is that I just removed it. MS is not allowing locked down bloatware in WP so it kind of feels like when you buy a PC but you can remove the things you don't like (I say "kind of" because it is way easier and there is a lot less). Also the carrier doesn't control access to updates. When WP has updates they roll out to us.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Third, how customizable is the home screen interface? I realize that I could just go with Android if I wanted customization, but I'm curious about what one can do with the current Windows offerings.

Well the home screen is the "Metro" look (I know it is not called that anymore). But you can add tiles you want to it and change where they are in the line up and their size, etc.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Fourth, back when I used Windows Mobile 6 (with two different carriers, AT&T and Verizon), having GPS enabled on your maps was actually an extra charge for some reason. Is this still the case, or can you actually use GPS to track your location for free now?

We use GPS no problem. You can also get (and/or buy) apps that also performs this. Probably the biggest issue most people have right now is that that there is no Google Maps app (why help another competitor that is pretty weak gain anything?) for the phone but the Nokia Maps and GPS is good. Nokia has been rolling out quite a few things maps wise and they are very good (they own NavTeq, one of the major mapping services)

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Are there any good syncing options between Google Calendar and WP8 apps (either native, or downloadable add-ons)?

My wife uses Google email and calendaring exclusively and the integration is great. This is on the WP and MS side of things and we haven;t had a problem yet. On set up the phone asked where to go for calendering and email and we could link in many services if we wished (and of course MS is also pushing to use "theirs" ["Live" I think] - but we turned it off.

Hope this helps!

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineHoMsaR From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 1176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 29, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 3900 times:

Thanks. Those are some helpful responses.

I'll have to browse the app store a bit more to see what's available, and if there are apps that meet my needs (like banking and travel apps that I use frequently), that will be a vote in favor.



I was raised by a cup of coffee.
User currently offlineAirPacific747 From Denmark, joined May 2008, 2389 posts, RR: 21
Reply 30, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 3899 times:

I just thought I'd share a picture with you of my new fatboy pillow with a wireless charger inside it. I just got it today. Suck on this, iPhone! :P



Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 29):
I'll have to browse the app store a bit more to see what's available, and if there are apps that meet my needs (like banking and travel apps that I use frequently), that will be a vote in favor.

Try this website. It will help you find what you are looking for  Smilehttp://xyo.net/lumia/android/?inclWP8=True&country=US

[Edited 2013-01-02 11:20:24]

User currently onlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12448 posts, RR: 25
Reply 31, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3866 times:

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 24):
Definitely surpassed it in my opinion. I love Android because you have choice. There are 3 maybe 4 top of the line Android handsets from different OEM's that blow away the iPhone and are usually cheaper too. SGS3/Note2, HTCOneX /Droid DNA, LG Nexus 4 etc.

I ended up getting SG3 on VZW, and one thing I liked was the flexibility. For instance it was cheaper for me to buy the 16GB internal storage model and buy my own add-on 64GB Micro SD than it was to get VZW's 32 GB model, so I ended up with a lot more storage than any of the VZW Apple options for similar or less money than their 32GB offerings.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
I'm one of the only people on earth to have actually liked the old Windows Mobile 6.0 OS, because it was very simple.

I had WM5 on a Motorola Q back in its prime and kept it a long time. It was quite good at telephony, i.e. the act of making a phone call even when coverage wasn't as good as it is these days.. Also it sync'd well with Outlook Calendar and Contacts and didn't require me to have a data plan.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):

First, what's the battery life of the Nokia 920 (or other WP8 devices for that matter)? My old Windows phones could easily go through a day of use and wind up with 50% battery life remaining. If I was good, I could go two days without a charge. My current Android (LG Optimus S) sucks for battery life (too much crap running in the background that I can't kill). I've often come close to running out of battery before I even get home for the day.

VZW S3 has Ice Cream Sandwich and holding down the home key gets you to a screen where you can see everything running in the background and get rid of it all with one touch. Seems to help the battery life a lot. Also picking a popular phone with a upgradable battery lets you get a better one with more capacity in many cases, although I have not seen the need to do so yet.

For me, getting a day of life is fine. I spend the $ to get 3rd party charging stands so I can plug my phone in easily in my car, home or at work so there's no issue at all.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Second, do these phones come with crap pre-installed by the carrier? That's one of my big problems with my current phone, and I'm actually thinking (whatever I go with) of buying a phone independent of any carrier, and just getting the service separately. If they do come with that kind of junk, how easy is it to remove it?

My phone is a lot better than the last one. Some VZW stuff is pre-installed, but it's easy to ignore. For instance, the previous VZW phone used to ask me which navigation program to use, and that choice would not persist across reboots. Now it persists so you set it once and forget it.

Quoting HoMsaR (Reply 27):
Fourth, back when I used Windows Mobile 6 (with two different carriers, AT&T and Verizon), having GPS enabled on your maps was actually an extra charge for some reason. Is this still the case, or can you actually use GPS to track your location for free now?

As above, VZW did load a nav app on my last phone and it was a pain to ignore it. The current one has the apps there, but they are easy to ignore, and I haven't actually bothered seeing if they can be removed from the phone totally.

The VZW nav app used to charge you to use it, but Google Maps is/was free, other than whatever data it consumes, which hasn't been a significant factor for me. I suppose the premise of the pay app was that it wouldn't charge you for data use? In any case, VZW can show you your data plan usage over time and I never used more than 0.5GB and that was with Maps and podcast downloads etc.

Good luck with your choice. I think you'll find all the current high end phones are pretty darn impressive.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 32, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3853 times:

Out of curiosity, are the batteries in the Lumia removable by the consumer? I know many smartphones manufacturers make it pretty tough for the consumer to remove the battery without special tools as when the battery starts to have issues, they would rather the consumer either send it to them to get it replaced at a pretty high cost (Of course there's a nice market in battery places doing them as well for a lot less.). That's one of the reasons why I like BlackBerry as you can easily remove the battery as some folks do carry a spare battery with them or they replace the stock battery (and battery cover) with a larger battery. Even the upcoming BB10 devices will retain the ability for consumers to replace the battery themselves.

User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1830 posts, RR: 10
Reply 33, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3842 times:

Quoting baldwin471 (Reply 20):
The Surface is incredible.

Agreed. I used one for the first time a couple weeks ago and loved it.

Quoting moo (Reply 25):
And thats my point - any developer using that approach isn't developing for Blackberry, they are developing for Android and "making do" on Blackberry... and Blackberry have lost one developer.

They lost one developer...and gained more customers who would rather have the better Android apps on a BB device. Nobody can ever win 100%, this is one of such trade-offs.

Quoting moo (Reply 25):
And once you have developers doing that, Blackberry no longer control their own development environment and are beholden to whatever direction Google takes Android in.

Nonsense. There's a large group of loyal BlackBerry developers who develop across platforms. This is one top of the dev team actually employed by RIM whose sole job it is to grow the number of native applications on the platform. This mass-migration doomsday scenario you describe is unrealistic.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 26):
He's told me he'd gladly dump the RIM and that's the direction his agency is moving.

Which isn't such a terrible thing for RIM. There are many companies that have gone the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) route, but continue to use the extremely secure BlackBerry Network, and thus still paying RIM. This is actually an extremely lucrative business segment for the company.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinebaldwin471 From UK - England, joined Mar 2012, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 34, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 3801 times:

Quoting srbmod (Reply 32):
Out of curiosity, are the batteries in the Lumia removable by the consumer? I know many smartphones manufacturers make it pretty tough for the consumer to remove the battery without special tools as when the battery starts to have issues, they would rather the consumer either send it to them to get it replaced at a pretty high cost (Of course there's a nice market in battery places doing them as well for a lot less.). That's one of the reasons why I like BlackBerry as you can easily remove the battery as some folks do carry a spare battery with them or they replace the stock battery (and battery cover) with a larger battery. Even the upcoming BB10 devices will retain the ability for consumers to replace the battery themselves.

Nope. Well, no for the 920, yes for the 820/822.


User currently offlinemoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3924 posts, RR: 4
Reply 35, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3756 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 33):
gained more customers who would rather have the better Android apps on a BB device

And also gained most customers who will gradually realise they aren't beholden to RIM and the Blackberry for their app ecosystem, so a leap to Android when they next purchase a device is that much easier - no need to find alternatives for apps, they are all there already...

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 33):
There's a large group of loyal BlackBerry developers who develop across platforms.

Your "large" group is pitifully small, and will get smaller when devs stop learning to develop for the BB natively when they realise they can get away with a 90% functionally-complete port by just repackaging the Android app - bingo, they now have their app on two platforms for the cost of developing for one, rather than the cost of developing for two...

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 33):
This is one top of the dev team actually employed by RIM whose sole job it is to grow the number of native applications on the platform.

Right - so RIM employ a dev team to do what Apple, Android and Microsoft are getting for free, namely having a large number of app developers develop for their ecosystem.

Can't you see whats wrong there?

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 33):
This mass-migration doomsday scenario you describe is unrealistic.

Except its already happening - Blackberry market share has already dropped hugely in the past year.

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 33):
This is actually an extremely lucrative business segment for the company.

One which is actually disappearing quite quickly now that Exchange and ActiveSync do all the important things RIM pushes for their devices - encrypted traffic, push messaging, remote device lock and wipe etc etc etc... With the added bonus that its all completely within the control of the corporation rahter than RIMs.


User currently offlinemdavies06 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2009, 382 posts, RR: 0
Reply 36, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 3667 times:

Hi all I got some questions about the Lumia 820/920 as I am considering buy one of those hope you can answer them. I am also thinking about a number of others such as Samsung Note II, Iphone 5 and HTC 8X as well.

1. I checked out a friends Lumia 800 today and one thing I noticed straight away is that the FB app does not go into landscape mode. Are apps in WP8 usually not displayable in landscape mode? I am asking because I prefer to read in large fonts and reading in landscape helps

2. Also, he showed me an email or message and it does not have word wrap on. Does IE10 and Office 2013 comes with word wrap (I know this may seem a silly question but in my short test on my buddy's phone I did not see word wrap in use).

3. Would a.net display with word wrap on WP8 IE10?

4. Is the internal memory of Lumia 820 too small with just 8GB because I am aware that 4GB was already eaten up by the firmware. I am aware of the microSD slot presence but is 4GB enough for the future apps and cache data which will surely grow in size. The reason I ask is the 820 is a lot cheaper than 920 and to me the only difference between the two which might matters to me is this.

5. Is there a way to play flash video on them as I read that only wma and mpeg are supported for movies.

6. I am aware that WP8 can be sync with an external source such as a desktop PC for example but what about the apps and the settings within the apps? For example for the IE10 in WP8 is it true that all my history and favourties are sync to another Win8 desktop/tablet in the same MS account? Say for example is it possible for me to read some web sites at home on my Win8 desktop at 7am whilst having breakfast, and continue reading the same link at 7:30am on WP8 whilst on a bus on my way to work, without having to search for the web link again or (worst) send the link to hotmail so I can access the same link in a WP8 device?

7. Does anyone use flightradar24 on a WP8 (browser IE10) and is it convenient to use?

8. Do the other phones I mentioned above (like the iphone 5 or SG Note II) do better or worse in these points in a significant way?

Thanks
mdavies06

[Edited 2013-01-05 06:31:46]

User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 37, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3641 times:

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
4. Is the internal memory of Lumia 820 too small with just 8GB because I am aware that 4GB was already eaten up by the firmware. I am aware of the microSD slot presence but is 4GB enough for the future apps and cache data which will surely grow in size. The reason I ask is the 820 is a lot cheaper than 920 and to me the only difference between the two which might matters to me is this.

The micro SD is for storing photos, videos, music, documents, etc., not for storing apps and programs. The reason why the iPhone comes in multiple storage sizes is because there is not an option to use any sort of removable storage. Adding a bigger SD card only gives you the ability to put more media on it.

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
5. Is there a way to play flash video on them as I read that only wma and mpeg are supported for movies.

Part of the problem is that Adobe is no longer supporting the mobile version of Flash and any newer phones or tablets do not have it. Developers are moving towards using HTML5 instead and this trend started several years ago. There is likely an app out there which will allow you to play Flash content.


User currently offlineAirPacific747 From Denmark, joined May 2008, 2389 posts, RR: 21
Reply 38, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3558 times:

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
7. Does anyone use flightradar24 on a WP8 (browser IE10) and is it convenient to use?

It can be used in the browser.. but convenient? No.

And the app sucks at the moment.. I really hope Flightradar will update it ASAP..


User currently onlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12448 posts, RR: 25
Reply 39, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3540 times:

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
I am also thinking about a number of others such as Samsung Note II, Iphone 5 and HTC 8X as well.

Will chip in with what I know from using Android 4.1.1 on a Samsung Galaxy S3. Note that 4.1 and 4.2 are both being called "Jelly Bean" which is quite confusing...

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
I checked out a friends Lumia 800 today and one thing I noticed straight away is that the FB app does not go into landscape mode. Are apps in WP8 usually not displayable in landscape mode? I am asking because I prefer to read in large fonts and reading in landscape helps

Am finding almost all apps I use on 4.1.1 do landscape mode, whereas many on my last phone (HTC Tbolt with Andriod 2.3.x Gingerbread) did not, including the home screen!

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
Is the internal memory of Lumia 820 too small with just 8GB because I am aware that 4GB was already eaten up by the firmware. I am aware of the microSD slot presence but is 4GB enough for the future apps and cache data which will surely grow in size.

I think it'll be fine. Keep in mind that apps you don't use can be removed and caches can be cleared.

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
Is there a way to play flash video on them as I read that only wma and mpeg are supported for movies.

Seems all recent devices don't do Flash. All Andriod 4.x platforms do not have flash.

Quoting mdavies06 (Reply 36):
I am aware that WP8 can be sync with an external source such as a desktop PC for example but what about the apps and the settings within the apps?

Seems to be more of a per-app question, than a per-platform question. As above, everyone is pretty happy to sync your contacts since they are integral to the phone itself and are a great source of data to be mined (remember clicking on the "I agree" button?). Other things are more likely to be synced via the app, such as FB friends, etc.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineHELyes From Finland, joined Oct 2010, 917 posts, RR: 1
Reply 40, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks ago) and read 3332 times:

It looks Lumia phones did well in the fourth quarter 2012, Nokia showed surprisingly good numbers:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspe...ith-4-4-million-lumia-phones-sold/

[Edited 2013-01-10 07:10:51]

User currently offlinemax999 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1039 posts, RR: 0
Reply 41, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 3311 times:

I tried out the 920 over Christmas when I was visiting family in the Seattle area. There's a growing Nokia user base in Seattle because of the heavy concentration of Microsoft employees there...Microsoft is subsidizing the cost of a Nokia phone for its staff.

The user interface was cool and it was easy to use. The relative lack of apps (compared to Android and iOS) could be an issue. Biggest concern I had was the large size of the phone...it's noticeably thicker and heavier when compared to the current high-end phones on the market such as the S3 and iPhone 5.



All the things I really like to do are either immoral, illegal, or fattening.
User currently offlineHELyes From Finland, joined Oct 2010, 917 posts, RR: 1
Reply 42, posted (1 year 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3296 times:

Quoting max999 (Reply 41):
Biggest concern I had was the large size of the phone

True, now it seems there's a lighter and thinner aluminium 920 coming.

http://www.neowin.net/news/nokia-pre...lumia-flagship-with-aluminium-body


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