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UK/Irish Horsemeat In Burgers Scandal  
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

The last couple of days have seen serious scandal reported in the UK press, following the revelation that tests revealed that burgers supplied to a range of supermarkets as all-beef products in fact contained a proportion of horse. One brand was found to contain 30% horsemeat.

Horsemeat is rarely, if ever, consumed in the UK. It is more commonly eaten in France and Belgium, but the somewhat squeamish British public have never really come to terms with the idea of eating horses.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21054688

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environmen...-burger-scandal-result-criminality

Clearly there are serious problems here in terms of the fact that products should be labelled correctly, and there are serious penalties for failing to ensure this is done. Of course, there are also strict requirements for the traceability and correct slaughtering of meat in the EU, and if retailers are selling products containing a different meat from the one they believe or portray it to contain then logically it has to be questioned whether these other safeguards were likely to be met.

So, a few questions:

1) Would you be particularly perturbed if you had eaten this products and heard this news?
2) Should the suppliers and/or the retailers face criminal charges? MPs are suggesting so.
3) What is the likely reason for or benefit from the introduction of such meat into these 'beef' products?
4) What similar cases are you aware of, and what were the outcomes or findings?
5) Do you normally eat horse? If so, do you like it and why in particular?
6) Should we just 'get over it' or does it really deserve all this fuss in your opinion?

My own view is that we should be able to rely on labelling, and that it is a pretty big deal. Further to the horse issue, it is also being suggested that some products are being found to contain some pork, without any labelling to reflect this. That would obviously have pretty big consequences for followers of certain religions.

I would probably eat horse if I knew what I was getting, but have never actually tried it.


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30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6157 posts, RR: 29
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1543 times:
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Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Would you be particularly perturbed if you had eaten this products and heard this news?

No, I would probably laugh and say to myself "I didn't even know I liked horse"

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Should the suppliers and/or the retailers face criminal charges? MPs are suggesting so

Yes, because it was false advertisement, not because it was horse. People expected beef and didn't get what they thought they were buying.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
What is the likely reason for or benefit from the introduction of such meat into these 'beef' products?

Cheapness or a mix up at the packaging plant.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
What similar cases are you aware of, and what were the outcomes or findings?

Back in the 1970s Jack in the Box had Kangaroo meat show up in its warehouse (not actually in stores, like is widely believed) The PR was terrible and Jack in the Box disappeared from some markets and people still talk about it to this day. Kangaroo is, or at least was, more expensive than beef so it was not done to save money.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Do you normally eat horse? If so, do you like it and why in particular?

I don't think so, but if something was mislabeled I might have.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Should we just 'get over it' or does it really deserve all this fuss in your opinion?

People should get over it. People should be more worried about all the odd chemicals they eat when consuming processed food.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1536 times:

Quoting falstaff (Reply 1):
Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
What is the likely reason for or benefit from the introduction of such meat into these 'beef' products?

Cheapness or a mix up at the packaging plant.

As far as I understand from news sources, the plants don't normally actually handle horse. The worst-case suspicion has to be that old nags were illegally slaughtered for consumption and introduced to the products to save a bob or two. I imagine old horse is cheaper than correctly-reared cow.

Quoting falstaff (Reply 1):
People should get over it. People should be more worried about all the odd chemicals they eat when consuming processed food.

True, but if there is no knowledge of how the animal was reared and slaughtered then there is every chance the meat itself could contain any range of nasty things, medicine for example.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1531 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
1) Would you be particularly perturbed if you had eaten this products and heard this news?

Nope. Maybe horse isn't something I'd normally consume, but why not... If I couldn't tell the difference, why would it matter?

I do agree it should be labelled properly, though. Then again, is anything in a restaurant? You only get the cooked food.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
2) Should the suppliers and/or the retailers face criminal charges? MPs are suggesting so.

Retailers... did they know about this? If not, they can't be prosecuted. Suppliers... Yes, probably. Criminal, civil, I don't know.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
What is the likely reason for or benefit from the introduction of such meat into these 'beef' products?

Same reason for which some airlines in the USA don't even give you peanuts anymore.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Do you normally eat horse? If so, do you like it and why in particular?

Not usually, but I can't be sure. I don't have moral qualms in doing so. It should taste good.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
6) Should we just 'get over it' or does it really deserve all this fuss in your opinion?

This is somewhat minor. It deserves a fuss because everything should be properly labelled, not because it was horse meat.


User currently offlinegabrielchew From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 3331 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1526 times:

I think the timing of all this is quite amusing...I just got back Italy where I ordered horse for the first time (on Monday) and was wondering if they just gave me the beef instead as I couldn't tell the difference!

To be honest, I think that this is quite appaling, not from the eating horse perspective (I have no problem with eating any kind of meat), but that the suppliers and consumers throughout the manufacturing process were duped into thinking what was beef, was actually horse or pork. Who knows what we're eating if things like this happen. This is why I don't eat things out of tins!



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User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6826 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1519 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 2):
I imagine old horse is cheaper than correctly-reared cow.

Well most horse meat is old horse, not 20 years old but "past running in competitions old".

I was reading on this recently (mainly on wikipedia since the articles are complete) and I learned that horse meat was quite nasty because it's mostly old racetrack horses that took all kinds of chemicals during their careers. More than half the meat comes from US horses, since eating and slaughtering horses is taboo there, but people actually in the business have no qualms about sending their horses to Mexico or Canada in terrible shape to be slaughtered there...

I have eaten horse meat occasionally, sometimes after buying it, sometimes in restaurants. It's nothing special really, but knowing this I won't be buying more anytime soon, if we ban the use of hormones and antibiotics in beef (making it more expensive) there's a good reason.

I also believe tracking and labeling should be meticulously enforced, makes me also think about the recent (and still current) scandal/debate about halal/kosher meat being sold to people without label. I'm fine with the meat but I don't want to be giving money to any religion, especially if for that money I get animals that are killed more cruelly than necessary.



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User currently offlineflipdewaf From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2006, 1578 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1496 times:
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The issue for me isn't actually the horse meat which has caught the news attention but the pork that was found. Horse meat, like beef, isn't very dangerous if it is not fully cooked whereas pork is.

Fred


User currently offlineDoona From Sweden, joined Feb 2005, 3771 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1466 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
1) Would you be particularly perturbed if you had eaten this products and heard this news?

Not as to the consumption of said horse meat, but rather at the mis-labelling of the product.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
2) Should the suppliers and/or the retailers face criminal charges? MPs are suggesting so.

There should be some repercussions for incorrectly stating the wrong ingredients on the packaging.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
3) What is the likely reason for or benefit from the introduction of such meat into these 'beef' products?

Probably to save money.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
4) What similar cases are you aware of, and what were the outcomes or findings?

Here in Sweden there's recently been a number of incidents where beef products have been discovered to actually be coloured pork. Not sure what the outcomes have been, it all sort of died down when retailers switched brands/producers.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
5) Do you normally eat horse? If so, do you like it and why in particular?

No, not normally. There's cold-cut horse meat on sale in most supermarkets here, but it's not something that I regularly indulge in. Have tasted it though, and it isn't bad.

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
6) Should we just 'get over it' or does it really deserve all this fuss in your opinion?

It deserves attention in regards to companies deliberately lying about the ingredients of a product, as well as the health implications of not cooking it properly if one believes it is indeed beef.

As for the squeamishness of consumers, I couldn't care less. People on this planet eat pretty much everything that is edible, from dogs (not just in Korea, as I understand it, for example it's not uncommon in parts of Central Europe) to ostriches to insects, and everything inbetween. Shut up and eat your dinner.

Cheers
Mats



Sure, we're concerned for our lives. Just not as concerned as saving 9 bucks on a roundtrip to Ft. Myers.
User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6157 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1456 times:
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Quoting Aesma (Reply 5):
I was reading on this recently (mainly on wikipedia since the articles are complete) and I learned that horse meat was quite nasty because it's mostly old racetrack horses that took all kinds of chemicals during their careers. More than half the meat comes from US horses, since eating and slaughtering horses is taboo there, but people actually in the business have no qualms about sending their horses to Mexico or Canada in terrible shape to be slaughtered there...

Back in the late 1990s (I forget the specific year) one of the track champions at, Fairmont Park, in Collinsville, Illinois was a horse that was purchased off of a rendering truck and trained to be a champ. I don't know how well known that was. A friend of mine who was the state gaming official at the track told me about it.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1382 times:

Frankly, I think anyone who mislabels any product and then gets caught doing it should face some stiff penalties; ( I'll let the authorities figure out what the penalties should be though.)

As far as I know, I have never eaten any horse meat. I have tasted a few different reptiles though, such as snapping turtle, iguana, rattlesnake, and alligator ; one of my uncles used to catch snapping turtles when I was just a kid, and occasionally he'd bring one by the house and my mom would fry it for my dad, who actually liked it; I don't like it as to tastes "fishy"; (even though I love many kinds of fish)

When my ship pent a month at St. Thomas (American Virgin Islands), there were a lot of big green iguanas in the hills, and for lack of anything better to do, some of the guys from the ship fitter's shop where I worked, killed a few iguanas with sling-shots and brought them aboard the ship and fried some of their meat; I can't say whether I "liked" it or not, but I DO like iguanas, so I was glad when they were ordered to "leave the iguanas alone".

Rattlesnakes and alligators; both CAN be eaten, and there's nothing wrong with eating them, but overall, I'm strongly against people killing them for any reason; both are part of the "natural world", both have a very important place in the natural scheme of things, and there would serious consequences if either species were to be decimated; if people wish to "farm" alligators for their hides, and it's tightly controlled, (as it is in a few southern states), I'm perfectly OK with that.

As far as eating meat is concerned, people would be MUCH better off if they were consume MUCh more bison and venison, as both are much better for human consumption, from a "health benefit" standpoint; I could easily cut my "grocery store" meat bill to almost zero if I wanted to, as we have a HUGE deer population in our area; I don't kill deer though, as I rather like them, I enjoy watching them, and I drive "cautiously" so as to avoid tearing my vehicles up. (plus, I don't care much for venison) Kroger's sells "ground bison" right next to the hamburger, but it's prohibitively expensive, so I never buy it. As for plain old cow, (beef), I eat a LOT of it ! (Especially when we visit Ryan"s Buffet in Terre Haute, about twice a week, on average.)

All of this talk about eating "this and that" has just given me an idea; (maybe I should start another thread about it.)

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6454 posts, RR: 32
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1371 times:
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Quoting Aesma (Reply 5):
I was reading on this recently (mainly on wikipedia since the articles are complete) and I learned that horse meat was quite nasty because it's mostly old racetrack horses that took all kinds of chemicals during their careers.

Where I live, in the poor parts of the city, people still use horse drawn carriages to pick up the garbage. Nowadays you can make a precarious living doing that due to all the recycling going on. Two things happen: 1) The horse gets too old, so the owner takes it to the clandestine slaughterhouses and gets cash for a new horse. 2) Junkies steal the horse, take it to the slaughterhouse and get cash. Either way, the meat ends up not in prestigious supermarket chains, but in the more ubiquitous street Taco joints. I can´t say I´ve never eaten in those, so I´m sure I´ve had some horse.

Quoting Aesma (Reply 5):
the business have no qualms about sending their horses to Mexico

Well. Not to the TIF slaugherhouses (Tipo Inspección Federal) Likely they are smuggled into the clandestine ones.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 9):
snapping turtles

I love them in soup.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 9):
iguana, rattlesnake, and alligator

I´ve eaten all. Iguana is almost exactly like chicken. Rattlesnake was too fibrous and tough to my taste. Rather flavorless too. Alligator was like chicken, but too tough. They sell alligator at our local HEB supermarkets.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 9):
I'm strongly against people killing them for any reason; both are part of the "natural world",

Well. We owned a cattle farm before my father passed. In the summer the place would be filled with rattlesnakes. To the point growing up we were prohibited from going outside the ranch house at night. We had to kill them because they (accidentally) would bite a calf and that was a big business loss for us.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 9):
MUCh more bison and venison, as both are much better for human consumption, from a "health benefit" standpoint;


I hear ostrich is the best. Almost no "bad" fat.


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13169 posts, RR: 15
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1355 times:

I recall that in the USA for years, horse meat was used for dog food. Maybe these bad burgers could be 'recycled' for dog food, and save more beef for humans.
I recall years ago with Roy Rogers fast food places, we used to call the hamburgers 'triggerburgers' (after the name of his famous horse used in his movies and TV shows). Sounds like these were real 'Triggerburgers'.


User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1331 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 10):
Well. We owned a cattle farm before my father passed. In the summer the place would be filled with rattlesnakes. To the point growing up we were prohibited from going outside the ranch house at night. We had to kill them because they (accidentally) would bite a calf and that was a big business loss for us.

That could easily become a problem with young calves; not so much with mature cattle; it's a known fact in western states where there is a lot of cattle grazing, that when a cow is grazing, they are "aware" when they get near a rattlesnake, and without even lifting their head up from grazing, they will just "alter their direction" a few degrees, and the snake will be more than glad to crawl away in another direction.

Believe me, I studied snakes much of my life, and I'm very familiar with many species of them, especially the ones we have in this country; contrary to what many people "think".........almost all snakes, even venomous species such as rattlesnakes are only interested in about two things; finding something to eat, and then finding a safe, peaceful place to "hide out" while they digest their meal; and they are VERY good at recognizing what IS "prey", and what is NOT "prey"; when a rattlesnake encounters an animal the size of a cow, it's actually an "accident", as all "pit vipers" have the ability to "sense" the temperature of a large mammal from a considerable distance; and even though snakes have no external ears, and are unable to hear sound (as we know it), they are very sensitive to very minute vibrations in the ground such as is made by any large animal. So even in a field full of grazing cattle, and with an abundance of rattlesnakes, even in darkness, it's an exception when the two come into close proximity to one another.

It's almost impossible for most people to have any understanding of a rattlesnake's behavior, because the average human, (with a human brain), is by nature, very fearful of venomous snakes; and not being able to distinguish a venomous snake from a completely harmless species, many people are therefore very fearful of ALL snakes ! What they don't realize is though, that almost ALL snakes are just as fearful of ANY creature the size of a human; and being a reptile, the "average" snake is very limited in it's ability to "think", and / or make decisions; snakes essentially just rely on "instinct". About all a person needs to remain reasonably safe in an area where there a lot of snakes, is to be ably to SEE everything on the ground, within maybe a 6 to 10 foot radius circle; so.....if you are in tall grass, weeds, or brush.....better get back on OPEN ground, ASAP !

Obviously, little children who reside in areas where snakes are common, need to be "educated" at a very young age, (or better yet, kept in the house !)

It's very easy for someone who DOES have some knowledge of the dangerous species of reptiles in a particular area, to become VERY "unsafe" if they move to a different part of the world; you may be quite safe as regards, say rattlesnakes in Texas, but if you journey to certain parts of, say Africa, and you chance upon say, a black mamba, what "worked" in Texas may very well result in your being bitten by the black mamba, as they are not known as being at all "fearful" of humans, and are known for being very "aggressive" (and very quick moving) creatures, (as snakes go), and anyone bitten by one will need very expert medical attention, very quickly to avoid becoming a fatality to the mamba's venom. My best advice about an encounter with a black mamba is.........try to SEE him while he's at least 50 feet distant, then run like hell in the other direction; (or be VERY skilled at knowing how to "deal with" a VERY dangerous snake.)

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently onlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1883 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1297 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 5):
I was reading on this recently (mainly on wikipedia since the articles are complete) and I learned that horse meat was quite nasty because it's mostly old racetrack horses that took all kinds of chemicals during their careers.

Not here. Although you get all kinds of mince from old horses (which I assume was the case in the UK, because those were burgers after all), the most popular horse cut around here is the horse steak, and that comes from horses raised to be slaughtered at a young age (less than two years). Obviously it's more expensive than beef, better tasting and leaner, too.

Old horse meat to make minced meat is generally exported to Belgium or the Netherlands and the worst parts made into pet food.


User currently offlinebabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1289 times:

The incident has serious implications for the Muslim community for who the majority do not eat pork.

It's the deception that is horrifying. You wouldn't mind if the label said 'This product contains a mix of meats including, beef,horse and pork.' I could decide to buy it or not, but don't go round pretending it's all beef.

This lazy and illegal practice needs to be stamped on.


User currently offlineAeri28 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 709 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 1286 times:

I dont' think the point is that it is eaten in many places in the world, fine with that I dont have an issue. I don't even have an issue with certain countries eating dog meat. Hell I was in Fiji one time and the guesthouse I stayed at outside of Savusavu told me they prepared Bat (but not for guests). I know people in the southern US eat raccoon, and possum and other game. Fine for them . No judgment on my part.

The 'beef' I have with it is that I expect to eat what I am purchasing or what I am ordering or depend and trust the store that is either selling it. I have no desire whatsoever to eat horsemeat. Never have. It is probably purely psychological my aversion to wanting to eat it, and it has nothing to do with it being a pet or a good friend to man or whateve lol. I tend to eat 'meat' (call me an unadventurous meat eater all you want) that I know and even I get squeamish about eating certain meat and can change my mind depending on how it's prepared. I tend to just stick with Beeff, Pork, Chicken and Snake.

Quoting dc9northwest (Reply 3):
Nope. Maybe horse isn't something I'd normally consume, but why not... If I couldn't tell the difference, why would it matter?

Would you think the same if it was Rat meat? Dog or cat meat? People do eat those in other countries, You probably just have no issue with horse meat. But some may. My view of horsemeat may be your view of Rat meat. And we shoudl get what we hope we have purchased and not a 'meat' substitute.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 16, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 1237 times:

Quoting babybus (Reply 14):
This lazy and illegal practice needs to be stamped on.

That's one description. Another, if for economic gain, would be fraudulent, and in the case of illegally-slaughtered meat - potentially dangerous.



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User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27235 posts, RR: 60
Reply 17, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1228 times:

The jokes are getting worse too :

http://i955.photobucket.com/albums/ae40/PhilipOA260/7E0BD6EB-3765-4391-A0F8-565F7C3A4F59-875-00000064B025383E.jpg


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 18, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1219 times:

Quoting OA260 (Reply 17):
The jokes are getting worse too :

Q: What do you want on your burger?
A: A fiver each way.

  



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinescbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12791 posts, RR: 46
Reply 19, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1217 times:
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The irony is that the horse meat poses no health risk. The Daily Mail reading populace are so indignant about it only because culturally, we don't eat horse. A Frenchman, on the other hand, would simply be laughing at us and considering us "crazy English".

While the health risk is minimal to non-existant, the bigger issue is how a product that shouldn't be there, got into the burgers in the first place.


I'm so hungry, I could eat a Tesco Value Burger.



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 20, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1208 times:

Quoting scbriml (Reply 19):
The irony is that the horse meat poses no health risk. The Daily Mail reading populace are so indignant about it only because culturally, we don't eat horse. A Frenchman, on the other hand, would simply be laughing at us and considering us "crazy English".

We don't know that. Horsemeat in general - fine, but if you don't know the origin of the meat then you can't trace its history and you have no idea what drugs or anything else was in it. That's why we have strict traceability and slaughtering rules.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineFlykev From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 1385 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1200 times:
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FORUM MODERATOR

Overall, I am pretty sure that I recently ate one of the implicated products and to be honest I really am not that fussed.
Yes, the labeling was incorrect however I am pretty sure the Supermarkets and likely even the manufacturer had no idea that horse was even in the meat they were using. I have a feeling that a supplier to these companies is to blame, whether they slipped some horse meat in to save money or it was a genuine mistake I do not know; but considering the meat was not dangerous I fail to see why there is much needed beyond some investigations and some fines handed out.

In regards to the pork contents and the like, again I expect this from the cheaper products as its fairly common and these production lines will likely make more than one product so its easily cross contaminated.
In regards to the religious implications - Whilst I am not affiliated to any religion, I would believe that a Muslim or Jew person would look to only buy Halal or Kosher food to ensure they avoided any issue like this to begin with?

Kev.



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User currently offlinebongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3650 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 1156 times:

Quoting scbriml (Reply 19):
While the health risk is minimal to non-existant, the bigger issue is how a product that shouldn't be there, got into the burgers in the first place.

How do we know that the health risk is "minimal to non existent" ?

In the food production world traceability is meant to be in place in order to prevent diseased animals entering the food chain, on the basis that the burgers were only meant to contain beef, and actually contained other species we can be sure that the traceability is non existent. The main problem with industrial scale food production is that it can quickly result in large numbers of people experiencing the downside when things go wrong.

Presently beef prices in the UK are rocketing, a butcher friend told me today that even worn out milking cows are fetching silly money to the region of £900 or so each. These cheap frozen burgers are selling for less than beef carcase price, on that basis is it any wonder that unscrupulous processors are taking liberties in order to meet their fixed price commitments to the supermarkets ?


User currently onlineBraybuddy From Nepal, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 23, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1110 times:

Quoting OA260 (Reply 17):
The jokes are getting worse too

You heard about the new beefburgers?

Guaranteed to give you the trots . . .

[Edited 2013-01-18 22:45:13]

User currently onlineBraybuddy From Nepal, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 24, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1085 times:

It didn't take long for someone to do it:



This is shocking news: Tesco own brand hamburgers have been found to have traces of meat in them . . .

Those Aldi horse burgers were nice, but I prefer My Lidl Pony.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 25, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 1066 times:

Cheap burgers? Just say 'neigh'.....


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinePhen From Ireland, joined Oct 2007, 317 posts, RR: 0
Reply 26, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 1045 times:

Tesco's new line of burger buns: thoroughbread.

User currently onlineBraybuddy From Nepal, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 27, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 1039 times:

Customer: "I'd like to order a beefburger"
Waiter: "They're off".


User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 28, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 1025 times:

Stop horsing around, guys!

A burger is the perfect food before a derby.

You'll be full of energy and gallop to the venue.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 29, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 1022 times:

What's that strange creaking noise?? Ah yes, it's most definitely the sound of the bottom of the barrel being well and truly scraped.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently onlinerlwynn From Germany, joined Dec 2000, 1097 posts, RR: 1
Reply 30, posted (1 year 10 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 1012 times:

I would eat a horse burger. Horsemeat tastes good.


I can drive faster than you
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