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Idaho's Big Wolf Problem  
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 4977 times:

A few years back, wildlife "officials" decided that Idaho needed more wolves; so wolves were captive bred, and released into the wild. Now it seems that Idaho has yet another problem ! They're up to their eyeballs in wolves ! BIG wolves !

A pack of hungry wolves out looking for something to eat.............




Damn! That wolf is so big I thought he was a grizzly bear at first!




That's an even bigger wolf!




Now that's a big wolf !




You sure wouldn't want to let your cat out around here !



This is a picture of a pack of 25 wolves taken in the Weippe area in Idaho. Each one of these eats 24 Elk per year.
This group alone will consume 600 Elk this year. That doesn’t even factor in the “sport kills.”
The Canadian Gray Wolf runs in packs of up to twenty wolves. For every one animal they kill to eat, these Canadian wolves kill about three more just for the fun of it. The biologists call it "sport-reflex killing" or "lustful killing". The Canadian Gray Wolf is a killing machine. These are federal wolves, as it was the federal government that introduced them into Idaho over our objections. They told the State of Idaho that the wolves would be considered recovered when they had a total of 100 wolves in Idaho.
 
Now they have between 800 and 2,000 wolves and the situation is out of control. Idaho 's wolf emergency is a state issue. And in this situation, the State of Idaho has both a duty and the authority to protect its people and their property.
House Bill 343 lays out the facts, the argument and the authority to do so. - Idaho Rep Phil Hart.
 
Can you imagine gun control out there.
 
This is not a good place to let the cat out. Make sure you are packing protection when you go for a walk in the mountains. You never know when a wolf pack might surround you!

As it happens, my wife has been wanting a new fur coat; when she saw these photos, she has decided she wold like for her new coat to be "wolf"; Looks like I may have to take a trip to Idaho to go "wolf hunting"..........

Charley


Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
32 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7848 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4910 times:

Has anyone been killed or injured by these wolves? Until that happens is there really a wolf problem? Or is it just a bunch of pissed off hunters who now have to complete to kill elk?

User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4903 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 1):
Has anyone been killed or injured by these wolves? Until that happens is there really a wolf problem? Or is it just a bunch of pissed off hunters who now have to complete to kill elk?

Attacks by healthy wolves on humans are very rare, but they do happen.

Fellow in Northern Saskatchewan was killed and partly consumed by a pack a few years ago. He apparently was close to the dump at the mine site where he was working, and the wolves had become overly familiar with humans. Also within the past five years campers on Vancouver Island were, not so much attacked, but were 'persons of interest' to a lone wolf. It tried to drag one guy from his tent by the end of his sleeping bag, but was scared away. I also personally know a fellow who was skiing into work (yes, we do that in Canada) and was surrounded by five wolves. He skied faster ! Conclusion from forestry people was that these were likely juveniles who were curious.

Wolf presence tends to improve the overall health of prey groups by weeding out the elderly and infirm. The wide variation in the wolf population reported by the OP leads me to think much of the 'wolf epidemic' being reported is anecdotal, not based on hard evidence. But absent any effective population control, yes, the wolf population will increase to a point where there is not enough prey population to support the wolf population. So a controlled cull MAY be something to investigate, but not an all-out uncontrolled wolf hunt.

Lived around wolves a large part of my life, used to walk the dogs in the bush and occasionally I'd see one. Never felt threatened. Wolves would occasionally chase deer right into people's back yards in town. But let's face it: when living in the bush, or close to it, we're in the wolves homes.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21880 posts, RR: 55
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4894 times:

Paging George Martin, paging George Martin: your characters have escaped your stories. Please retrieve them.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2616 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 4836 times:

Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
Each one of these eats 24 Elk per year.
This group alone will consume 600 Elk this year. That doesn’t even factor in the “sport kills.”

That's a big reason wolves were re-introduced to Yellowstone National Park. The elk population had exploded because the alpha predator was gone. The issue with the wolves in Idaho, Montana and Washington is that ranchers are claiming that they are having livestock taken by the wolves. I'm sure it's easier for a wolf pack to take down a cow or a sheep than an elk or deer so it makes sense that would happen. In Eastern Washington, an entire pack was taken out after the state OK'd the hunt. In other areas, ranchers are compensated financially for livestock lost to wolf attacks.


User currently onlinemoose135 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2406 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4816 times:

At least some of those photos are bogus...

http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/idwolves.asp#photo

Remember, Snopes is your friend!



KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14140 posts, RR: 62
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4803 times:

I have seen wolves in zoos, but never as big as in the pictures above. Usually they are about the size of a big German shepherd dog, and not as big as a small pony. Are you sure that the pictures have not been photoshopped?
Btw, since a few years we have wild wolves in Germany again. Since the Iron curtain fell (which with it´s barbed wire fences and mine fields was also an obstacle to animal migration), several packs of wolves have migrated into the state of Brandenburg, where they are a protected species. No issues with them so far. Should they kill livestock, the farmer will get compensated.

Jan


User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4798 times:

Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
The biologists call it "sport-reflex killing" or "lustful killing". The Canadian Gray Wolf is a killing machine.

The 'sport killing' as you refer to, is generally:

a) teaching pups how to hunt and kill, not necessarily for food, or
b) late winter kills of very weak prey (most deer/elk mortality occurs late March/early April in these parts). In such cases, a lone wolf can bring down an elk, as it is too weak to resist.

Overall, wolf presence is a good thing, as Martha Stewart would say.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7966 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4784 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 2):
Attacks by healthy wolves on humans are very rare, but they do happen.

Attacks by dogs happen much more often. Wolves normally shy away from humans. Dogs are domesticated so they don't.

Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
This is a picture of a pack of 25 wolves taken in the Weippe area in Idaho. Each one of these eats 24 Elk per year.
This group alone will consume 600 Elk this year. That doesn’t even factor in the “sport kills.”

Says who? And 'sports kills' is something humans do. And your cat. Domestic cats are likely the single greatest source of anthropogenic mortality for birds and mammals in the U.S., not the reintroduction of wolves into the wild.



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlinepvjin From Finland, joined Mar 2012, 1427 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4778 times:

Nothing to worry about, the fact remains that pet dogs still kill WAY more humans than wolves do. I would be way more worried walking in some American city with all those regular shootings happening, after all humans are by far bigger danger than all the wild animals in the US combined.

Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
Can you imagine gun control out there.

I don't think you need any kind of automatic weapon to defend yourself against wolves. I think the most important part would be getting automatic / semi-automatic weapons under strict control, regular hunting rifles are way less likely to be used to commit mass murders and other similar acts.



"A rational army would run away"
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4754 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 6):
I have seen wolves in zoos, but never as big as in the pictures above.

I didn't comment on that point in my 1st post. Male gray wolves CAN top 100 lbs, but 125 is probably the limit. The alleged wolves shown in the pics look to be more like 200, not realistic. I don't really hae any experience with Photoshop, soI couldn't really say ...

Quoting NoUFO (Reply 8):
Quoting connies4ever (Reply 2):
Attacks by healthy wolves on humans are very rare, but they do happen.

Attacks by dogs happen much more often. Wolves normally shy away from humans. Dogs are domesticated so they don't.



   Quite right. With terriers apparently leading "the pack", as it were. But not really surprising, since terriers were bred to hunt and kill rats and mice in grain storage areas. They are very aggressive for domesticated creatures.

Quoting NoUFO (Reply 8):
Quoting Geezer (Thread starter):
This is a picture of a pack of 25 wolves taken in the Weippe area in Idaho. Each one of these eats 24 Elk per year.
This group alone will consume 600 Elk this year. That doesn’t even factor in the “sport kills.”

That also concerned me. Pack size is generally in the 7-10 range, where the alpha male can enforce order fairly well. With 25, he would spend all his time fending off "young Turks". Also, command and control during the hunt would be problematic.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4741 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 6):
I have seen wolves in zoos, but never as big as in the pictures above. Usually they are about the size of a big German shepherd dog, and not as big as a small pony. Are you sure that the pictures have not been photoshopped?
Btw, since a few years we have wild wolves in Germany again. Since the Iron curtain fell (which with it´s barbed wire fences and mine fields was also an obstacle to animal migration), several packs of wolves have migrated into the state of Brandenburg, where they are a protected species. No issues with them so far. Should they kill livestock, the farmer will get compensated.

As for these pictures, I'm not sure of anything! As someone who is relatively familiar with photo editing and "post processing", I think many people "assume" a lot more is possible than is actually the case with "Photoshop"; yes, one can do many things with editing software, but I'm very skeptical if it's possible to make "ordinary" wolves look three times as big as wolves are known to get; so here we are with pictures of seemingly GIANT wolves ! I'm hoping someone can offer some first hand knowledge about how this is possible.

Jan; I agree completely! I had never heard of a wolf getting that big; but when you see 3 or 4 pictures of people holding them up.......they sure looked "real" to me! BTW; there is a fenced in, "wolf sanctuary" in my state of Indiana, about 100 miles or less from where we live. I'm hoping to go there sometime to do some photography. I have a friend who has photographed the wolves there, then makes large prints of them and sells them at our Covered Bridge Festival every year; just as you say, they all appear to be about the size of a large German Shepard.

I can say this though, from my personal observation; for many, many years, coyotes were always a "western species"; most of the western states have lots of cattle ranchers, and the ranchers HATE coyotes; so they have shot them, trapped them with "leg hold" traps, and poisoned them, in order to get rid of them; I don't know how successful their efforts have been on reducing the coyote population "out west", but apparently the coyotes are pretty smart, because now they seem to have all "migrated" to the east; we have a HUGE coyote population here in Indiana now, and from the ones that I have seen in the past few years, they seem to be getting bigger every year ! I'm sure that they must have an easier time finding prey animals, as there are domestic dogs and cats all over the place; thanks mainly to all of the irresponsible pet owners who insist on allowing their dogs and cats "run free", and are too cheap (and irresponsible) to have them "fixed".

We could probably benefit from having a few wolves around here, as our deer population just keeps growing every year, as does the number of collisions with cars, (which in turn, drives our car insurance rates up.) For the first few years after I came to Indiana, I was all in favor of "culling" the deer, by expanding the hunting season on them; now I'm very glad we have so many deer, because our much WORSE problem is irresponsible car drivers who insist on speeding every place they go; so now, almost every one who speeds a lot, has collisions with deer a lot, and I'm hoping maybe they will learn to slow down, but I think it's wishful thinking on my part. It seems like we now have more deer AND more speeder every year. ( Perhaps an "open season" on "speeders" might help ?


Quoting connies4ever (Reply 7):
The 'sport killing' as you refer to, is generally:

a) teaching pups how to hunt and kill, not necessarily for food, or
b) late winter kills of very weak prey (most deer/elk mortality occurs late March/early April in these parts). In such cases, a lone wolf can bring down an elk, as it is too weak to resist.

Overall, wolf presence is a good thing, as Martha Stewart would say.


Overall, I think everything you say is right; (if only you hadn't brought Martha into it !) Martha, in REAL life, is not "warm and fuzzy" as she appears to be on TV ! She's mean, vindictive, cheap, and treats people "under" her as if they were "excrement". I am very skeptical about th assertion that wolves routinely kill three times as many animals as they eat !
I only posted those photos because the wolves were so much bigger than any I had ever seen; I thought maybe something in their Idaho diet was making them get bigger.


Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20822 posts, RR: 62
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4731 times:

So is there a wolf problem in Idaho and its surrounding states or not? According to Idaho Fish and Game, wolves are no longer endangered, and permits are being issued to hunt them similar to other big game animals.

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/wildlife/wolves/?getPage=260



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7966 posts, RR: 12
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4729 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 10):
That also concerned me. Pack size is generally in the 7-10 range, where the alpha male can enforce order fairly well. With 25, he would spend all his time fending off "young Turks". Also, command and control during the hunt would be problematic.

Well, I did a reverse picture search and apparently the photo in the opening post was shot in the Wood Buffalo Nationalpark Alberta and Northwest Territories, Canada - not in Idaho.

http://ecocides.tumblr.com/post/1183...f-25-timberwolves-hunting-bison-on

And there it reads:

"The size of the pack is a sign of how rich their prey base is during winter when the bison are more restricted by poor feeding and deep snow. The wolf packs in this National Park are the only wolves in the world that specialise in hunting bison ten times their size. They have grown to be the largest and most powerful wolves on earth."



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4716 times:

Quoting pvjin (Reply 9):
I don't think you need any kind of automatic weapon to defend yourself against wolves.

Actually that is probably the only instance in the US where I would think an automatic type weapon would be useful.

Unlike almost all predators in the US, wolves hunt in packs. If the pack has had interaction with hunters, and is hungry enough to attempt to prey on humans - very likely it will take more than a few shots to kill the main males/ female hunters.

A hunting rifle - big calibre - against a grizzly would work. But a wolf pack - there I want a lot of ammo in the clip and a high fire rate.


User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2616 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4711 times:

Quoting Geezer (Reply 11):
I had never heard of a wolf getting that big; but when you see 3 or 4 pictures of people holding them up.......they sure looked "real" to me!

When a wolf (or a large breed dog for that matter) is up on its hind legs, they can look much bigger than when on all fours. Interesting you mention that wolf park in Indiana. My sister, who is a dog trainer, went there as part of a seminar one time. She got to go into the fenced-off area with employees of the park and the alpha male came up to them. He got up on his back legs and put his front paws on my sister's shoulders and was looking her in the eyes - face to face at the same level.
I have seen the photos and he looks HUGE in them but in reality he was around 100 pounds and the size of a large domestic dog. Her reaction to the experience by the way, was a mixture of awe and utter terror!





Quoting Geezer (Reply 11):
I'm sure that they must have an easier time finding prey animals, as there are domestic dogs and cats all over the place; thanks mainly to all of the irresponsible pet owners who insist on allowing their dogs and cats "run free",

Same here - we are seeing more and more coyotes and seems like every week there's a flyer up on the mail kiosks about a missing cat or puppy. I know exactly where they are - in the belly of a coyote. You wanna keep your kitty? Dom't let them out to roam free all over the neighborhood.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14140 posts, RR: 62
Reply 16, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4696 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 15):
She got to go into the fenced-off area with employees of the park and the alpha male came up to them. He got up on his back legs and put his front paws on my sister's shoulders and was looking her in the eyes - face to face at the same level.

I had a friend´s Labrador-Rottweiler mix bitch put her front paws on my shoulders to lick my face, and I´m 6 ft tall. But i knew that she was happy and in a playful mood (wagging tail and ears pricked up) and just wanted a good cuddle and her tummy scratched. After we had a bad start she eventually became my best canine friend.

Jan


User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4662 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 15):
You wanna keep your kitty? Dom't let them out to roam free all over the neighborhood.

I have 2 cats and 3 dogs; my no.1 cat, "Bootsie" wouldn't go outside if I left the doors open all day; my 2 "outside" dogs used to run loose 24/7; now I have to keep the female tied on the front porch, or the neighbor's female shepard will eat her up! The first vet trip cost me $200 to get her sewed up, and the second time was $300; now I only let her run when I'm right here watching. My 120 lb black Lab male dog goes to "visit" the neighbor's dogs. I never have to tie him up.

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6616 posts, RR: 35
Reply 18, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 4632 times:
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Quoting Geezer (Reply 11):
I can say this though, from my personal observation; for many, many years, coyotes were always a "western species"; most of the western states have lots of cattle ranchers, and the ranchers HATE coyotes; so they have shot them, trapped them with "leg hold" traps, and poisoned them, in order to get rid of them; I don't know how successful their efforts have been on reducing the coyote population "out west",

My father was a catltle rancher. We had a few hundred Charolais. We don´t particularly hate them, but they will kill a calf, usually a new born and it was a business loss for us. Our ranch was not meant for meat, it was a reproductive facility. We raised the best Charolais examples and we sold them to other ranchers who wanted to better their stock. So any new born was a significant loss. Sometimes, in the drought years, they would atttack and kill or maim grown cows. If they were pregnant, it was a huge loss. So yes, we killed them whenever we had the opportunity. Not with poison or traps. My father hated that. We were only allowed to do it with rifles.

From the few I killed, I can tell you that once you see them up close, two things would surprise you. Their size, and the size and sharpness of their teeth. I would hate to be bitten by those teeth. And boy were they cunny. They were like engaging guerilla warfare. Probably one of the smartest species out there.


User currently offlineUSAIRWAYS321 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1848 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 4611 times:

Idahoan here, and I can't help but roll my eyes. It's not a "big problem."

Wolves typically stick to very remote, mountainous parts of the state, and the comment about being concerned to let your cat out is laughable. Sure, the wolves may get at livestock now and then, but that's hardly unique to Idaho.


User currently offlineArrow From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 2676 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4550 times:

Quoting USAIRWAYS321 (Reply 19):
Idahoan here, and I can't help but roll my eyes. It's not a "big problem."

Thanks for introducing a little sanity to the debate. I thought those pictures looked a little strange myself. I remember when they introduced those "Canadian" wolves down there to control the elk population and rebuild the wolf population.

We've seen and heard wolves a few times on backpacking trips in the Rockies. My favourite was a 3-day trip on the Skyline Trail in Jasper when my wife, hiking in front of me, turns back and says there must be another group coming up because she just saw a big German Shepherd coming up the trail. It was a grey wolf, by itself fortunately, and it just took off. There's a mountain caribou herd in this area and that's why the wolves are there.

I worry much less about wolves than I do about grizzlies -- and we've run into lots of them over the years.



Never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4517 times:

I work with this quite a bit in my job.

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 1):
Has anyone been killed or injured by these wolves? Until that happens is there really a wolf problem? Or is it just a bunch of pissed off hunters who now have to complete to kill elk?

According to the 2011 Idaho Wolf Monitoring Progress Report
http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/docs/wolves/reportAnnual11.pdf

During 2011, 71 cattle, 121 sheep, 3 horses, 6 dogs, and 2 domestic bison were classified by USDA APHIS Wildlife Services as confirmed wolf kills. Nineteen cattle, 26 sheep, 1 horse, and 1 dog were considered probable wolf kills.

There were 296 wolf deaths that year, 200 of them were killed during hunting season. The estimated wolf population in Idaho during 2011 was 746 wolves

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 6):
I have seen wolves in zoos, but never as big as in the pictures above. Usually they are about the size of a big German shepherd dog, and not as big as a small pony. Are you sure that the pictures have not been photoshopped?

I don't think all those photos are real.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 10):
That also concerned me. Pack size is generally in the 7-10 range,

Here (at least in Idaho) the mean pack size is 6.5 animals.

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 12):
So is there a wolf problem in Idaho and its surrounding states or not? According to Idaho Fish and Game, wolves are no longer endangered, and permits are being issued to hunt them similar to other big game animals.
Quoting USAIRWAYS321 (Reply 19):
Idahoan here, and I can't help but roll my eyes. It's not a "big problem."

Wolves typically stick to very remote, mountainous parts of the state, and the comment about being concerned to let your cat out is laughable. Sure, the wolves may get at livestock now and then, but that's hardly unique to Idaho.

As USAirways said, they aren't more than a nuisance problem for some ranchers in Idaho. And, if they become a nuisance they are killed by Idaho Fish and Game.

Their territories are primarily on US Forest Service lands. Here in Washington I've done a lot of work on public land on the east side of the state and I've never heard of a sighting on any project I've worked on. They are dispersing east from Idaho but they have mostly been documented as lone animals. There just aren't as many of them here.

If you really want to get your wolf geek on feel free to wade through that monitoring report. All you want to know about where and how many of them there are in Idaho is there.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 22, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 4485 times:

As far as wolf and related canid threats go, I'd be more concerned about the emergence of the coywolf hybrid. Yes, coyotes and wolves, usually wolves predating coyotes, getting down and dirty. So you seem to wind up with a very bulked up coyote, used to being a single hunter, and like coyotes, not particularly worried about people. And also likely "street-wise" in an urban setting, if you believe in "ancestral memory".

Suspected of killing a female hiker on Cape Breton Island a couple of years ago. Urban person, probably ran when she saw the creature(s), which triggered the prey drive. I think she was only 22 or 23.

Also photo'd north shore of St Lawrence River taking down caribou single-handedly.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coywolf

http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2013...s-coywolves-found-in-Cape-Breton/1

http://www.theprovince.com/entertain...ck+super+coyote/7932070/story.html



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2616 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 4463 times:

Quoting USAIRWAYS321 (Reply 19):
and the comment about being concerned to let your cat out is laughable.

To clarify - my comment was in regard to cats in suburbia encountering coyotes, not wolves in the wilderness. Hope that makes it less laughable because coyotes DO take cats here. I'm sure a wolfpack in the wild wouldn't bother since kitty would hardly provide a snack to a hungry pack of 6 to 10 wolves.


User currently offlinepvjin From Finland, joined Mar 2012, 1427 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4456 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 14):
Unlike almost all predators in the US, wolves hunt in packs. If the pack has had interaction with hunters, and is hungry enough to attempt to prey on humans - very likely it will take more than a few shots to kill the main males/ female hunters.

Well I thought shooting one or two of them would scare rest of them for at least long enough to reload, but then again I'm not a specialist in wildlife behavior so I could very well be wrong.



"A rational army would run away"
User currently offlineAirport From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 25, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4451 times:

Quoting USAIRWAYS321 (Reply 19):

Idahoan here, and I can't help but roll my eyes. It's not a "big problem."

Wolves typically stick to very remote, mountainous parts of the state, and the comment about being concerned to let your cat out is laughable. Sure, the wolves may get at livestock now and then, but that's hardly unique to Idaho.

From another Idahoan, this comment perfectly sums it up.


User currently offlinejpetekyxmd80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 4391 posts, RR: 26
Reply 26, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 4428 times:

You mean something the OP posted from his 'sources' isn't accurate? And in the name of some bogus political grandstanding? Why, i'm shocked!


The Best Care in the Air, 1984-2009
User currently offlineUSAIRWAYS321 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1848 posts, RR: 9
Reply 27, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 4404 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 23):
To clarify - my comment was in regard to cats in suburbia encountering coyotes, not wolves in the wilderness. Hope that makes it less laughable because coyotes DO take cats here. I'm sure a wolfpack in the wild wouldn't bother since kitty would hardly provide a snack to a hungry pack of 6 to 10 wolves.

I was referring to Geezer's comment in the thread starter that people in Idaho should be concerned to let cats out. I don't have any issue with what you said!

Quoting jpetekyxmd80 (Reply 26):
You mean something the OP posted from his 'sources' isn't accurate? And in the name of some bogus political grandstanding? Why, i'm shocked!

  


User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 28, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4340 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 23):
To clarify - my comment was in regard to cats in suburbia encountering coyotes, not wolves in the wilderness. Hope that makes it less laughable because coyotes DO take cats here. I'm sure a wolfpack in the wild wouldn't bother since kitty would hardly provide a snack to a hungry pack of 6 to 10 wolves.

You have a much better chance of encountering a black bear in suburbia than a wolf. Hell, even mountain lions are occasionally seen in suburbia. They had a sighting of one of these in a Seattle neighborhood just a few years ago.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 29, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4327 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 28):
You have a much better chance of encountering a black bear in suburbia than a wolf. Hell, even mountain lions are occasionally seen in suburbia. They had a sighting of one of these in a Seattle neighborhood just a few years ago.

Basically agree. However, in the small Manitoba town Iived in about 25 years (pop around 2,000) there weere 3-5 instances of wolves spotted in town annually. Bears were an everyday thing, deer I could hand feed in the back yard (the does only, the fawns always stayed behind Mom). Occasionally a cougar -- in fact the 1st siting of one to my knowledge was in a bush right by the day care centre. Which made sense from the cat's p.o.v. : small, bite-size target, slow moving, oblivious to threats. I mentioned that at coffee one morning and the mothers present were aghast... 



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 30, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4323 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 29):
small, bite-size target, slow moving, oblivious to threats.

When my grandchildren were small and though the zoo lions, tigers and bears were cute - I told them that to those predators small children look like snacks.


User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 31, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4308 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 29):
Basically agree. However, in the small Manitoba town Iived in about 25 years (pop around 2,000) there weere 3-5 instances of wolves spotted in town annually. Bears were an everyday thing, deer I could hand feed in the back yard (the does only, the fawns always stayed behind Mom).

When I worked in Bissett, Manitoba it wasn't infrequent to see a wolf, moose or bear. But, in Idaho seeing a wolf in the suburbs would be a rare thing.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineUSAIRWAYS321 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1848 posts, RR: 9
Reply 32, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 4282 times:

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 28):
You have a much better chance of encountering a black bear in suburbia than a wolf. Hell, even mountain lions are occasionally seen in suburbia. They had a sighting of one of these in a Seattle neighborhood just a few years ago.

There was a mountain lion roaming along the Boise River near BSU a few months ago. I don't recall ever hearing the same about a wolf in the nearly 4 years I've lived here.


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