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Giving Up Smoking - Any Tips?  
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 1928 times:

I really have to give up smoking, as particularly with my health track record the last two years it is nothing short of idiotic for me to smoke.

I have decided that today is quit day. HELP!

I don't really intend to use any aids other than will power, but if I need to may consider them.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
44 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16885 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

I smoked from when I was 17 until I was 23, it took me about two years to quit once I decided. I finally figured out that I had to ween myself off of the addiction to nicotine. The mental addiction would take years to subside, here's how I quit.

I counted how many cigarettes I usually smoked a day, it was 12, and then I limited myself to no more or less than 12 cigarettes a day for a month or two. Then I cut it back to 11 cigarettes a day for a month, the next month I cut it down to 10 a day. I continued this each month until I got it down to one cigarette a day I usually smoked before I went to bed. I smoked one cigarette a day for a month or two and then one day I just didn't have that cigarette.

What I found was I had to cut down my consumption before I quite, quitting a one cigarette a day habit is much easier than quitting a 12 cigarette a day habit.

Try it, take a pack and figure out how many cigarettes you need for the day and take the others out. Spread your cigarettes out, one an hour etc..

This worked for me, where just quitting cold did not.



Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlinecorinthians From United States of America, joined May 2008, 358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1893 times:

I started smoking when I was 15. I’m in my mid-30s now and I pretty much did it fulltime, like a pack a day, until about six months ago. During that time, I quit twice for about a year each time, but always went back to it. I now smoke on and off – so some days I’ll have one or two and the other days I won’t have any. I think I’ve come to conclusion and have accepted the fact that I will never really quit smoking. And I’m not sure I really care about it anymore. I can never seem to get rid of the “urge”, no matter how hard I try.

I’ve also tried those electronic cigarettes, too, and found they didn’t really help as they were “unfulfilling”. They don’t help quitting, regardless of what the advertisements say. And they aren’t healthy for you as they have chemicals that can cause throat cancer.

Other than that, I’m going through the same struggle, so I can’t offer much advice. Maybe find some motivators to help you quit. A few things helped me cut down. For one thing, cigarettes have become really expensive in the NYC area, so I am trying to save some money by smoking less. Price goes up here every year. Also, smoking might affect your sexual performance. I don’t want to go through that, so I cut back. It’s especially the case when you get older.


User currently offlineSmittyone From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1892 times:

I finally quit for good two months ago today. I had smoked for many years at a low level (pack every three days at most). Even so the addiction was really strong since I have a very addictive personality.

Physically the withdrawal symptoms subside pretty quickly, though you will wake up every morning with nuclear waste in the back of your throat for awhile! On the positive side, feeling and warmth in your fingers and toes again, being able to laugh, yell or jog without hacking up a lung are very nice. Most importantly I have found that my personality is completely different now...I'd been a moody, irritable ass for the past 15+ years and it was taking a toll on the relationships with my family. Now I'm "Mr. Fun to be around" again because I'm not constantly in withdrawal and anxious to be through with whatever I'm doing to get to the next 'hit'. What a waste it is to be a nicotine slave.

Mentally it is tricky. I had quit several times for up to a month over the years but ended up caving in because down deep I hadn't really decided that I was really done with it. This time it has been very easy and other than a little false nostalgia about smoking early on I don't miss it or have any desire to go back. The eye opener is when you really recognize that all smoking does for you is temporarily get you to where you can be all the time if you just quit.

Speaking for myself, cold turkey was the only way to go...combined with exercise.

Best of luck to you!


User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9536 posts, RR: 31
Reply 4, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1885 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
I don't really intend to use any aids other than will power, but if I need to may consider them.

You are on the right track. Will power is the only way. Celebrate the last cigarette, put a carton of 200 on top of the cupboard, look at it verey day anbd tell yourself each time you look at it, NO, I QUIT, I DON'T TOUCH IT.

Once you don't have that urge anymore trash the carton. Never buy cigarettes again.

I quite more than 30 years ago, after a long day in NY, an overnight flight to FRA in a TWA L1011 F cabin, no sleep and one cigarette after the other, I thought I had enough and I felt like it as well.

BTW, never had jetlag afterwars



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineCXfirst From Norway, joined Jan 2007, 3075 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1855 times:

Personally, I don't smoke and don't intend to, but my father did a lot and has managed to quit.

I think the best advice he got was to "try again". First time he tried to quit, he lasted a couple months, next time a bit less than a year, and the third time he was successful.

If you don't manage to quit first time around, just try again, and eventually it will work.

-CXfirst



From Norway, live in Australia
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2808 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1850 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

This might sounds silly but try adding up all the financial stuff in regard to smoking. I know where I come from a pack of cigarettes is 10 bucks a pack. If you're smoking a pack a day thats over 3650 dollars! You could buy a nice airline ticket somewhere for that. Health is for sure the thing that concerns you the most, but if you have another reason maybe it will really click that it is just not worth it.
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 7, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1846 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 6):
This might sounds silly but try adding up all the financial stuff in regard to smoking. I know where I come from a pack of cigarettes is 10 bucks a pack.

It's not silly at all, in the UK it's a critical factor. My preferred smokes cost around £8 a pack. About two packs every 3 days. An obscene amount of dengi.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2808 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1843 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 7):
It's not silly at all, in the UK it's a critical factor. My preferred smokes cost around £8 a pack. About two packs every 3 days. An obscene amount of dengi.

There ya go! Celebrate quitting with a nice trip to Paris, Amsterdam, or New York with your savings! Best of luck, I'm rooting for you.
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3550 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1839 times:

I stopped smoking using E-cigs (the real kind, not the cheap mall kiosk/convenience store ones). I started reading the E-Cigarette forums, purchased different kits (over a year and a half) and many different types of liquid at different strengths. I've settled on 12mg/ml strength "juice" which satisfies my cravings and the oral fixation associated with smoking. The amount of money I've spent on e-cigs/juices is close to $500 but it was a great learning experience and I really enjoy the different flavours I have on hand.

Quitting smoking is a very good choice as there are too many reasons why the habit is really pointless. The cost to smoke in Canada is very high (in some provinces it costs $13-14 for a pack of 25 cigarettes) and the pictures on the box are disgusting. One person I know who smokes goes as far as covering the pictures with sticky-notes just because they're so disturbing.

Good luck with your quit. Take the money you spend on cigarettes and put it towards something you really would enjoy (a nice meal, an aircraft model, etc).



Support the beer and soda can industry, recycle old airplanes!
User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1415 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1828 times:

Will power alone. View it as a fiat accompli- not "I am giving up smoking" but "I have stopped smoking, and that's behind me now".

One thing to beware of is drinking; firstly it will really make you want to smoke, secondly you'll get drunk a lot faster now because you don't keep stopping for cigarette breaks. Take care to drink in moderation for the first few months.

Finally, if you fail, take a look at yourself in the mirror and say "I have failed, but my next attempt starts now" and make it so. Don't beat yourself up for ages; it'll just make you less likely to start trying again because not trying is easier. It took me three goes, but I got there in the end.

Another way to do it (haven't tried this but apparently it is very effective) is to find a friend who is willing to help and give them a certain amount of money which corresponds to what you would be spending on smoking. Set up a standing order to them basically. If you make it a year you get the money back for a nice holiday. If you fail, your friend will donate the money to a cause you hate. Pick the worst thing you can think of; the NRA, the Labor Party- whatever is the opposite of your personal views. Think about the laughing face of their spokesman when you get cravings.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2298 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 10):
One thing to beware of is drinking; firstly it will really make you want to smoke, secondly you'll get drunk a lot faster now because you don't keep stopping for cigarette breaks. Take care to drink in moderation for the first few months.

RussianJet,

You spoke of health... If health's an issue, quit drinking too.

My grandfather quit smoking in the 1970s, I think, and he definitely didn't smoke for the 15 years for which I was present.

On the other hand, drinking was a significant contributor to (if not the cause of) his death.

So, if you're doing it for your health--don't smoke and don't drink. Do it right!


I think a good idea (first step) is to identify why you are/were smoking, and why you want to quit. It's very hard to quit an addiction (especially a physical one--never had to go through that myself, but I've heard stories). That said, a change of scenery always helps. Decide to quit and take a break by going somewhere else.

I've never had a physical addiction--just psychological. At a certain point, I realized it wasn't worth it. It quickly stopped being an issue.

As long as you're mentally strong in controlling your urges, you'll be able to do it. Good luck.


User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1774 times:

I can't for the life of me see why so many people seem to have so much problem quitting smoking; after all, it should be 10 times easier NOW than it ever has been; up until fairly recently, people who smoked outnumbered non-smokers about three to one; now, that has turned completely around.........smokers are now just a very small "minority" of the total population.

Not to mention..........if you smoke, where are you going to do it now ? Where I live, you can't smoke in ANY restaurant any more, you can't smoke in ANY city, county, state or federal office building, and there are more and more "ordinances" being passed every day, making it illegal to smoke "out doors", on public sidewalks; add to all of that, you even run an extreme "risk" if you smoke in your own home, IF there is a small child or infant present; now-a-days, you may be drug into court and be charged with "child-endangerment" if you smoke around a child, or in many cases, if you even use the dreaded (but very common) "f" word around anyone under about 21 years of age.

So adding everything up, smoking is not only "un-healthy", it has become downright "inconvenient" ! Now....how does one rid themselves of this nasty, unhealthy, stinky habit ? To start out with, I think it has something to do with one's overall "smarts"; ( you will notice I didn't say "intelligence", I said "smarts") (there's a BIG difference!)

Ask yourself this; why do so many people START smoking in the first place ? I think the most obvious answer is, "because every one else smokes"; ( the desire to "be like" everyone else ) I noticed early on that an awful lot of people did an awful lot of extremely "dumb", and in many cases, very self-destructive things; ( like drinking and getting drunk, drinking then driving, stealing and going to jail, watching asinine people doing asinine things, on asinine "reality" shows on TV, etc etc etc; I then sat myself down in front of a large mirror, stared at the image in the mirror (without blinking) for maybe two minutes, then asked myself........is it REALLY "worth it" to try and be like "everyone else" ? IMO, the most obvious answer to that question is, "not hardly" ! So right there, at maybe age 30 (give or take a year or two), I waited until the next "mooch" asked me for a siggy, and I said......."here......take the whole damned pack"! I don't "need" them any more. This all happened about 50 years ago and I haven't smoked another cigarette since, and have no plans to EVER smoke another one.

I have always felt like I must be "luckier" than everyone else, or at least most of them. My "goal" in life is to enjoy it as I pass through it, have as few "problems" as possible on the way through, and to avoid most of the things that get so many people into so many problems in the first place. Have you ever known or "been around" someone with terminal lung cancer ? I have; several times; it's terrible; it's NOT for me! just another of many reasons I decided early on, I don't NEED to smoke. there are no real "guarantees" in life; but there ARE a hell of a lot of "statistics"; all of which indicate to me that smoking, drinking, stealing, doing drugs, attempting to become sexually involved with hundreds of women per year............all of these things are counter productive and are better to be avoided from "early on"; what's that "big word" everyone uses ? an "epiphany" ? Maybe I had an "epiphany" when I was about 30; I have been following my brain (rather than my "willie") now for about 50 years, and I still don't smoke, drink alcohol, patronize prostitutes, waste my money on lottery tickets, or my time on reality shows on TV; and my "life" seems to be right on track ! So my best advice about smoking is..........follow your BRAIN ! NEVER follow "others"; ( the chances are good that they're "following" some other fool.) ( and you don't want to end up where they're going to end up anyway)

Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9051 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1758 times:

All it took for my son was to watch his Uncle die from emphysema. It took a couple of years, but he learned. The last time he saw his Uncle alive at his Aunts funeral (A smoker) and his condition was when he quit. It has been years now since he smoked.


It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 14, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1753 times:

Quoting Geezer (Reply 12):
Ask yourself this; why do so many people START smoking in the first place ? I think the most obvious answer is, "because every one else smokes";

In my case it was severe stress/depression. And in my 30s when I got started. Not very typical.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8332 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1747 times:

Change your habits/schedules related to smoking. If you stop by a pub for a beer after work and smoke there then stop going.

Also set up up your own "Smoke Free" areas. The first place to quit is your house or flat. Need a cig? Step outside. Rain & snow help slow you down.

And buy a brand you really don't like. Buying your favorite brand just reinforces your enjoyment.


User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6307 posts, RR: 33
Reply 16, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1741 times:

No, do not buy a brand you dislike, buy none. It only hurts for about 72 hours but if you try to delay it you will not suceeed. Stop cold turkey. Also realize that there is a good chance, depending on how long you've smoked that there may be a lifelong desire at certain times. Do it.


Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineplaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1250 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1737 times:

Congrats on making the decision to quit smoking. It can be tough.

I am certified in treating nicotine dependence (a more formal term), completing my training at the Mayo Clinic. In practice I have been support individuals in quitting tobacco use (all form) for about 10 years.

I'm happy to help, answer questions, etc. Just send me a PM.



I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlinecupraibiza From Australia, joined Feb 2007, 836 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1727 times:

Far out he asked for tips on giving up smoking. Not everyones life story!

This is what worked for me.

Varenicline (trade name Chantix in the USA and Champix in Canada, Europe and other countries, marketed by Pfizer, usually in the form of varenicline tartrate), is a prescription medication used to treat smoking addiction. Varenicline is a nicotinic receptor partial agonist - it stimulates nicotine receptors more weakly than nicotine itself does. In this respect it is similar to cytisine and different from the nicotinic antagonist, bupropion, and nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) like nicotine patches and nicotine gum. As a partial agonist it both reduces cravings for and decreases the pleasurable effects of cigarettes and other tobacco products. Through these mechanisms it can assist some patients to quit smoking.



Everyday is a gift…… but why does it have to be a pair of socks?
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9051 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1721 times:

Quoting cupraibiza (Reply 18):
Far out he asked for tips on giving up smoking. Not everyones life story!

Explaining how and why someone managed to quit smoking from watching a person who was loved, die a little each day from smoking in my book is certainly a tip. A damned good one. The tip, do not smoke, it will kill you horribly.  Wow!



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlinebohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2719 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

I got to the point where I was only smoking in two places: cars and bars. I hardly go to a bar anymore so the only place I was really smoking was in my car. A little over three months ago, I let the pack of cigarettes run out, then I gave my lighter away and never bought another pack of cigarettes.

It was hard the first few days, especially reaching for the door pocket in my car to find nothing there. Once I got past the first week, I have had no problems at all. In fact quitting was much easier than I thought. BTW I did not use any patches, gum, etc.

A few days ago, I tested myself by going into a bar for the first time since I quit smoking. I went into a bar that allowed smoking. I was able to have a few drinks without having the urge to smoke while others smoked near me. I also never realized how much my clothes smelled of cigarette smoke when I got home. That was an eye opener.

So yes it is possible to quit smoking using will power alone.


User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1688 times:

I can't for the life of me see why so many people seem to have so much problem quitting smoking; after all, it SHOULD be 10 times easier NOW than it ever has been; up until fairly recently, people who smoked outnumbered non-smokers about three to one; now, that has turned completely around.........smokers are now just a very small "minority" of the total population.

Not to mention..........if you smoke, where are you going to do it now ? Where I live, you can't smoke in ANY restaurant any more, you can't smoke in ANY city, county, state or federal office building, and there are more and more "ordinances" being passed every day, making it illegal to smoke "out doors", on public sidewalks, and I don't even think you can smoke in bars anymore; add to all of that, you even run an extreme "risk" if you smoke in your own home, IF there is a small child or infant present; now-a-days, you may be drug into court and be charged with "child-endangerment" if you smoke around a child, or in many cases, if you even use the dreaded (but very common) "f" word around anyone under about 21 years of age.

So adding everything up, smoking is not only "un-healthy", it has become downright "inconvenient" ! Now....how does one rid themselves of this nasty, unhealthy, stinky habit ? To start out with, I think it has something to do with one's overall "smarts"; ( you will notice I didn't say "intelligence", I said "smarts") (there's a BIG difference!)

Ask yourself this; why do so many people START smoking in the first place ? I think the most obvious answer is, "because every one else smokes"; ( the desire to "be" like "everyone else" ) I noticed early on that an awful lot of people did an awful lot of extremely "dumb", and in many cases, very self-destructive things; ( like drinking and getting drunk, drinking then driving, stealing and going to jail, watching asinine people doing asinine things, on asinine "reality" shows on TV, etc etc etc; I then sat myself down in front of a large mirror, stared at the image in the mirror (without blinking) for maybe two minutes, then asked myself........is it REALLY "worth it" to try and be like "everyone else" ? IMO, the most obvious answer to that question is, "not hardly" ! So right there, at maybe age 30 (give or take a year or two), I waited until the next "mooch" asked me for a piggy, and I said......."here......take the whole damned pack"! I don't "need" them any more. This all happened about 50 years ago and I haven't smoked another cigarette since, and have no plans to EVER smoke another one.

I have always felt like I must be "luckier" than everyone else, or at least most of them. My "goal" in life is to enjoy it as I pass through it, have as few "problems" as possible on the way through, and to avoid most of the things that get so many people into so many problems in the first place. Have you ever known or "been around" someone with terminal lung cancer ? I have; several times; it's terrible; it's NOT for me! just another of many reasons I decided early on, I don't NEED to smoke. there are no real "guarantees" in life; but there ARE a hell of a lot of "statistics"; all of which indicate to me that smoking, drinking, stealing, doing drugs, attempting to become sexually involved with hundreds of women per year............all of these things area counter productive and are better to be avoided from "early on"; what's that "big word" everyone uses ? an "epiphany" ? Maybe I had an "epiphany" when I was about 30; I have been following my brain (rather than my "willie") now for about 50 years, and I still don't smoke, drink alcohol, patronize prostitutes, waste my money on lottery tickets, or my time on reality shows on TV; and my "life" seems to be right on track ! So my best advice about smoking is..........follow your BRAIN ! NEVER follow "others"; ( the chances are good that they're "following" some other fool.)
Charley



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11721 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1682 times:

I grew up in a house with two smokers. Then, I smoked for 10 years. Menthols. About 10 years ago, I gave it up. I just didn't buy another pack. I was on break, smoked the last one in the pack and just didn't buy another pack after work. That seems to be how people do it. It seems to me that people who make a big deal about these things don't fully quit. Don't do it for your parter, children, parents, friends. You are the only one you have to quit for.

In the Bible, Jesus tells a parable about two men in the temple. One makes a big production over giving money. He screams and cries and wrends his garments over giving a pittance. Another man quietly gives more than he really should. It is explained that the quiet man will recieve a greater reward. I have found that true in life.

But, you should quit smoking.



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlinecedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 8145 posts, RR: 54
Reply 23, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1652 times:

I wrote a long post on New Year's Day about giving up smoking, I hope you enjoy it.
http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo...ums/non_aviation/read.main/2480795

I don't think this is at all helpful - give yourself a chance and remove temptation, especially in the early days:
Quoting PanHAM (Reply 4):
put a carton of 200 on top of the cupboard, look at it verey day anbd tell yourself each time you look at it, NO, I QUIT, I DON'T TOUCH IT.

I don't even agree with this - nothing to celebrate, they're just killers:
Quoting PanHAM (Reply 4):
Celebrate the last cigarette

Best of luck, this is Day 610 for me as a nonsmoker and I'm super proud of myself, and you will be too.



fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2630 posts, RR: 23
Reply 24, posted (1 year 8 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1642 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 7):
My preferred smokes cost around £8 a pack. About two packs every 3 days. An obscene amount of dengi.


When I was growing-up in Georgia in the 50's and 60's it seemed like everybody smoked. People smoked in all the public places. Movie theaters, in line at the grocery store waiting to check-out, the damned doctors office, the lobby at the airport (in ATL they also had those nasty "spittoons"). Even at the funeral home everybody used to sit there waiting for the phone to ring----chain-smoking. I can remember opening the back door at the funeral home first thing in the morning and smoke would just pour out the door when I opened it.
People thought nothing of smoking in the car----and if the weather was bad----rarely cracked a window. Us kids would just sit there and breathe it in. That was the way it was back then. I think I was about 14 when I seriously started to smoke. Oh, I experimented, along with my best friend at the time, since I was about 8. I guess our parents couldn't smell it on us because THEY smoked so much----or they did smell it and laughed it off to the growing-up process.

I was living in Florida in 2002 and Florida taxes the hell out of cigarettes. I was paying almost $5.00 a pack back then.
Ridiculous!
When I started smoking nearly 40 years earlier I think a pack of cigarettes at the Jim Wallace gas station nearby was about .35 cents.

Anyway, the more I thought about it the more angry I became.
Finally one morning I was out and needed to go buy another carton and before I got to the car I just said f$@k them. I've had enough! I was so angry I stopped cold-turkey that very day and I've never smoked another one since.
I was about two months in to it when I found myself at a bar with a group of my buddies. Some were smoking, some weren't. I realized I had been sitting there drinking and socializing for over two hours and had never even given a thought to smoking! So don't believe all that crap about having to have a cigarette if you have a drink.

For the first six months or so I would occasionally have very vivid dreams about smoking. Dreams in which I would "bum" a cigarette from someone and light it up. I would become angry with myself----and wake-up---- and could taste the cigarette for a few seconds. It was weird.

After about six months it was like someone threw a switch. I never had another dream about smoking again.
Now it has been ten years and I have never looked back. I am so sensitive to smoke I can't even stand a camp-fire any more. I am embarrassed to death thinking of all those years smoking on airplanes right next to babies, little children and other non-smokers who were trapped there and couldn't get away. When I smell cigarette smoke on others I can hardly relate to all the early years of my life that I smelled like that! Making-out with me must have been like kissing an ashtray!

Best wishes to you!



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
25 L0VE2FLY : A friend of mine quit smoking the same way, for obvious reasons E-Cigarette makers mention all the benefit for using them except the most important o
26 Post contains images LFutia : First of all, Congrats on quitting smoking. I decided to quit in December, went electronic then recently went back to cigarettes but yes it takes time
27 Post contains images shamrock604 : That was my method too. Find a good brand of e-cig by doing some research. If you think you will need something to recreate some of the habits that g
28 Post contains images YVRLTN : Contract pneumonia - then smoke a cigarette. I guarantee it will be your last...
29 signol : This. I've never smoked but one of my former colleagues asked his GP for a prescription, a couple of weeks later and he never smoked again. This was
30 Smittyone : It's 'easy' because e-cig users haven't actually stopped taking the drug. 'Harm Reduction' is the lesser of two evils but people are kidding themselv
31 RobertNL070 : 27 March 2000 was the day I went smoke-free and I haven't looked back since. How? Cold turkey. Will power. Now for nail-biting, a much tougher nut to
32 RussianJet : Thanks all. Am using medium-strength patches at the moment, and doing ok on them. Cold Turkey, my preferred option, really wasn't working....
33 planeguy727 : Congrats on your progress, RussianJet. The best evidence in cessation shows that a combination of individual support from a cessation specialist, NRT,
34 Post contains links Smittyone : It doesn't seem the verdict is unanimous on NRT: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/pre...es/nicotine-replacement-therapies/ I'd be interested to know
35 na : One of the German top actors was killed by Marlboro. Dieter Pfaff, who smoked a whole pack of the red-and-white packed cigarettes every day, died of l
36 Maverick623 : STAY AWAY FROM THAT STUFF. Seriously, I have had friends and coworkers who tried that method, and not only do they still smoke, but it really messes
37 RussianJet : I agree. You have to just get used to the fact that your 'habit' is gone, and the quicker fixes don't do that. 24-hour patches are what I'm using, so
38 lewis : I did try Chantix (Champix in Europe) for a while. It worked as advertised. I had no suicidal thoughts but I did get light nausea whenever I took a p
39 F9animal : Chantix works pretty good. I started Chantix, and smoked for a week on it. The taste of smoking changed, desire to smoke went away, and was able to qu
40 planeguy727 : This is where working with a professional really helps. NRT has different doses and should not be used as a 1 for 1 replacement. The idea of NRT is t
41 oldeuropean : I once gave up smoking by just don't doing it anymore from one moment to the other. Forget nicotine patches, hypnosis, or whatever. Sooner or later yo
42 na : That works indeed. I did smoke when I was a student. I stopped it from one day to the other as well with no problems. After that for about 15 years I
43 RussianJet : I thought so too, and that's how it worked for me last time. This time, however, cold turkey was simply not going well. I am doing much better on med
44 RobertNL070 : The thin edge of the wedge. Now where is that cold turkey?
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