Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Looking Into Laser Eye Correction, Have You Had It  
User currently offlineklm672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2441 posts, RR: 3
Posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2422 times:

So I am looking into getting laser eye correction (get it?). There is a pretty good special going on through my employer, where I can get 30% off and also I can get payments done through payroll deduct. I have had glasses since I was about 10 and I have tried contacts (I even made a few posts on here about it), but contacts were not my friend. Laser eye correction seems pretty neat, and can easily be done. Has anyone had it done? Comments? Regrets?

33 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 8872 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2390 times:

I do know someone who had this done, a few years ago. He is happy with the results so far. I personally have worn glasses all my life. I would not think of having the procedure done. Who knows 20 years out? It is very easy to change glasses, surgery not so much. Remember with age can come other problems such as cataracts, very common. Who knows how this would complicate other problems that might arise with your eyes. I think it is a very personal decision. Your decision only.

[Edited 2013-04-12 17:30:12]


It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently onlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5400 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2374 times:

I had it done 13 years ago, this summer. Was a little light sensitive at first, but sunglasses took care of that. No halos or any of that other stuff.

I'm just now starting to wear glasses again (at age 44) for driving at night. Daylight is not an issue.

I was told to expect 10 or 12 years before needing to wear glasses again.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently onlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4782 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2363 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

As someone who considers this from time to time, I can only offer these thoughts. First of all, from my experience everyone I know personally who have had it done swear by it, saying it was the best decision they made. I'm sure others here will say the same.

However the one thing I can't get past is if you do a little research, there are rare bad experiences that permanently affect vision, especially at night. The pessimist I am, I put a lot of worry about me being one of those rare cases.

You only get one pair of eyes. I'm sticking to glasses and contacts for now.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 4, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2363 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

I had it done, Lasik, in 1997. Never had any trouble since and I´m still going without needing eyeglasses. One of the best decisions I ever made. Thing is though, don´t go for the ones that seem more economically attractive. You need to do it with those who´ve done a lot and are more experienced.


MGGS
User currently offlineTLG From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 370 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2344 times:

I had it done in October 2000. I was quite nearsighted, and if I remember correctly I had a touch of astigmatism in one eye. I still have 20/20 vision almost 13 years later. I highly recommend it if your eyes are good candidates.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 4):
Thing is though, don´t go for the ones that seem more economically attractive. You need to do it with those who´ve done a lot and are more experienced.

There are very wise words. Saving $1,000 now is not important when your eyes are at stake. Go for reputation and experience, not price.

-TLG


User currently offlineWildcatYXU From Canada, joined May 2006, 2603 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2344 times:

First of all, what kind of refractive error you have and how large correction do you need? If you're myopic up to 5 diopters, go for it. Above that, consult with your optometrist and/or ophthalmologist, as the correction may have some side effects (such as halo visible during night driving).

I wanted to have it done myself, heck, it would be even free for me, as I worked for a company that owned a laser vision correction clinic. However, my vision was unstable at the time, so I wasn't a good candidate for the procedure. It created little bit of a trouble, since the prospective patients kept asking why I wear glasses when I work for the clinic. I always spent a little time with them and explained my situation.


User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6187 posts, RR: 30
Reply 7, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2273 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting WildcatYXU (Reply 6):
(such as halo visible during night driving).

The halo at night effect is a normal side effect and it eventually goes away. Takes awhile but it goes away, and it´s present when you direct your eyes towards very brilliant sources, such as traffic lights or street lamps. It´s bothersome, but not handicapping.



MGGS
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7445 posts, RR: 17
Reply 8, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2265 times:

My dad had lasik and well, it went well...for a bout a week. He told me that since he was legally blind, they had their work cut out for him on his eyes. He wears glasses at night and sometimes needs them for things really really (over 100 yards) far away.


次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4990 posts, RR: 19
Reply 9, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2239 times:

What does the FAA medical FAR's say about Lasix?

Back in the 80's most insurance companies would pay for the Lasix surgery 100%. Then a few years later the government decided to classify it as "cosmetic surgery" and the insurance companies stopped paying. But there sure was a run on it immediately after the announcement of the companies not paying but before the actual cessation date came.

While I have not had it done, I know quite a few people who have had it done in the early 80's. Some of them wore very heavy thick glasses and after the surgery only needed light glasses for reading and such. Others got away from their glasses entirely.
As others have said even 30 years down the road they still have their vision but even the worst case only needed reading glasses.

And whoever said to shop by skill and reputatio vs price was dead on. Go to the best Lasix guy you can afford.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7146 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 2231 times:

Don't need it thankfully and don't know anyone who has had it. I do know there are some rare bad cases and I think that is why they do one eye at a time but it seems like it is very safe and works very well for almost all people. However when I read this:

Quoting klm672 (Thread starter):
here is a pretty good special going on through my employer, where I can get 30% off and also I can get payments done through payroll deduct.

I was thinking bad idea. That last thing I would want for my eyes was getting something for a discounted price. Do your research and find the absolute best doctor. Whats spending $1,000 more for a good doctor. The last thing I ever worry about when picking a doctor is if there are any discounts around.

If you do it let us know how it goes.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineaa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3347 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2207 times:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 3):
However the one thing I can't get past is if you do a little research, there are rare bad experiences that permanently affect vision, especially at night. The pessimist I am, I put a lot of worry about me being one of those rare cases.

This is what concerns me too. Statistics are of no use if your eyes are the ones that are messed up.

Quoting WildcatYXU (Reply 6):
Above that, consult with your optometrist and/or ophthalmologist, as the correction may have some side effects (such as halo visible during night driving).

Just to clarify, an ophthalmologist (an MD/DO) is the only one who should be performing these procedures.


User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1332 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2200 times:

Had it done 14 years ago. Was about -1 in right and -3 in left. Now 20/20 in right, around -0.25 in left.

In terms of what I got vs how much I paid, it's the best money I have ever spent (with the exception of an appendectomy which I didn't really have a choice about).

Side effects- perhaps noticed some halos at the beginning but now nothing. I'd say I am a little slower to adjust in changes in light, and my eyes are also a little more sensitive to water in the shower, particularly in hard water areas. These are tiny, tiny prices to pay for perfect vision IMO.

The main thing to make sure you understand is the expected result. 20/20 in both eyes is very hard to achieve. I was lucky to be perfect in one eye. People often expect the impossible. Also note I had LASEK, not LASIK. The first night was extraordinarily painful and I needed lots of opiates to get through. However at the time LASIK was considered far riskier (though it was less painful). I don't know the current stats, but just make sure you educate yourself on all these things so you know precisely what you're expecting.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlinevarigb707 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2199 times:

Quoting klm672 (Thread starter):
Regrets?

Oh yeah...


User currently onlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5400 posts, RR: 14
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2183 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 9):
Back in the 80's most insurance companies would pay for the Lasix surgery 100%.

That was Radial Keratotomy, wasn't it? LASIK didn't come on the scene until the early '90's.

Quoting flymia (Reply 10):
I was thinking bad idea. That last thing I would want for my eyes was getting something for a discounted price.

Why? I had mine done at 1/2 price. Don't look at the price, look at the practice performing the surgery. In my case, the guys who did mine had been doing LASIK for 10 years before they did me.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1332 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2174 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 14):
Why? I had mine done at 1/2 price.

Me too- I got buy one eye get the other free. Price doesn't necessarily indicate competence.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29795 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2146 times:

My brother had it years ago.

I think I will get it done after I reach a personal weight-loss goal I have. it will be a while.

But I can see with some of the things I do where not having glasses would be help......Safety googles that fit over normal glasses just look stupid and are uncomfortabe.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineGeezer From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 1479 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2126 times:

Before I came to Indiana to live about 10 years ago, I lived just north of Cincinnati; one of the very first clinics in the U.S. to perform the procedure that you're talking about was the MId-West Eye Institute in Cincinnati; I can't think of the doctor's name right at the moment, but this doctor performed thousands of Lasik procedures; and as far as I know, is still doing them; I probably knew 50 people who he had performed it on; every single one of THESE people are happy, and satisfied; HOWEVER.......no two human beings are alike; what "works" on the first 10,000, may very well NOT work on the next ONE; I also know two people who had it done, and their experience went in exactly the opposite direction. If a loved one of mine was going to have Lasik done next week, I would take them to the Mid-West eye Institute, because not only does this one doctor have the best reputation in the country, he has also performed MORE Lasik procedures than any other doctor; BUT.........it STILL didn't "work" for every single one of his patients.

Not too long after I moved to Indiana, I found out that I needed to have a cataract removed, and a "man-made" lens installed; The Opthalmologist who performed my surgery is in Terre Haute; because I also have glaucoma, I go to his office every 6 months and have my eyes checked, and I will be using a prescription solution in my eyes every day, permanently; I have absolutely 100% confidence in this doctor; plus.....I really like him ! He's "into" modern art and photography, and I'm just "into" photography; he always has his nurse schedule me as his last patient; after about 5 minutes discussing my eyes, he always gets into photography, and for the next hour, we "chit chat", mostly about photography; I once asked him about lasik; ( I already knew I wasn't a candidate for it ) he explained it pretty much like I just tried to; it's a very good procedure, for quite a large number of people; BUT.........it doesn't always work on everyone !

The two people I knew that it didn't "work" for are essentially "out of luck".........it's not like, say, a tattoo, that you can have removed; I guess you could say, It's more like getting castrated; (once they're gone, they're gone for good.)

On the one hand, if you go strictly by statistics, the numbers are definitely on your side; ( but there's still always going to be a few losers. ) So I guess it's all how lucky you feel.

By all means, if you DO opt for it.........pick a VERY, VERY experienced doctor, and talk to about a dozen of his patients FIRST.



Stupidity: Doing the same thing over and over and over again and expecting a different result; Albert Einstein
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19568 posts, RR: 58
Reply 18, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2120 times:

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 1):
I do know someone who had this done, a few years ago. He is happy with the results so far. I personally have worn glasses all my life. I would not think of having the procedure done. Who knows 20 years out?

I do! Well, 13 years out, anyway. I still have 20/20 in the left and 20/15 in the right. I do get some stars around point sources of light late at night, although I'm told newer techniques have less of that effect.

13 years of no glasses, no contacts. 13 years of never having to think about my eyes or my vision. If there are no ill-effects 13 years out, I'm thinking it's safe to say that we're clear for 20 and 40 years.


User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8507 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2108 times:

Quoting klm672 (Thread starter):
Has anyone had it done? Comments? Regrets?

Get recommendations. Do not just let anyone operate on your eyes! My mother had it done and she consulted both of her cousins beforehand (each of them are ophthalmologists) and they sent her to a doctor in Memphis who did a flawless job.

Quoting type-rated (Reply 9):

While I have not had it done, I know quite a few people who have had it done in the early 80's.

That wasn't Lasik, that would've been some form of RK (which according to Wikipedia was first performed by a Russian doctor in 1974). Lasik is safer because the laser is computer controlled and capable of removing individual layers of cells at a time (which I find quite incredible).


User currently offlineGot2fly From UK - Wales, joined Apr 2011, 20 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2087 times:

I had LASIK back in 2003 and have experienced no problems. However, before I committed to it I visited several different clinics and spoke to many of their past patients for their opinions. I chose a clinic that was more expensive (about £1000 per eye) but I personally felt more comfortable with them.

My pre-operative prescription was -5.0 in my left eye and -5.5 in my right eye. 10 years after the procedure I still have 20/20 vision in both.

I had always wanted to be a pilot and contacted the UK CAA regarding a Class 1 Medical as I now met the initial vision requirements (after LASIK). Because of the LASIK there were additional tests that were required, particularly with regards to "starbursts" and contrast and also stability of my 20/20 vision. This took nearly 24 months as the CAA wanted to compare my results in various tests to a group of normal (non LASIK) pilots who were currently flying. I fell right in the middle of the group and I believe I was granted one of the first initial Class 1 medicals in the UK for someone having LASIK. I don't have any limitations on my license and do not have any additional tests on my yearly medicals.

So for me it all worked out great and has allowed me to fly for a career, however, as other posters have said, do not just go for the cheapest option. Do some research and if possible speak to past patients for their opinion.


User currently onlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5400 posts, RR: 14
Reply 21, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2087 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 18):
I still have 20/20 in the left and 20/15 in the right. I do get some stars around point sources of light late at night, although I'm told newer techniques have less of that effect.


My results were the same, except 20/20 right and 20/15 left, unfortunately, I'm right eye dominant.. I did have halos, but they went a way after a couple of months. The light sensitivity was much more persistent and still lingers.

I say go ahead and do it, so long as you're a good candidate for it.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 18):
13 years of no glasses, no contacts. 13 years of never having to think about my eyes or my vision

Liberating.


By the way, I wore glasses since the 4th grade and contacts from 16 yo until I had the surgery at 32. I was -7.25 in the left eye and -7.5 in the right with astigmatism.

My eye doc says I still have 20/20 & 20/15, but due to age issues (she says), I wear glasses while driving at night and I find myself cheating and wearing them in darker environments. C'est la vie.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineWildcatYXU From Canada, joined May 2006, 2603 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2066 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 7):
The halo at night effect is a normal side effect and it eventually goes away.

I have a feeling that what you saw was just due to healing. However, there may be a permanent halo effect that shows up when the treated area is smaller than the pupil diameter. Then the eye can see the difference between the treated and untreated area's optical properties. Since one can remove only a limited amount of tissue from the cornea (they keep a minimum corneal thickness of 400 µm), with growing correction the treated area decreases. Therefore patients with large refractive error are more likely to suffer in halo effect. I have to say, however, that I'm out of the industry since 2005 and I'm certain that in those 8 years new techniques were developed and the side effects may be less of a problem.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 11):
Just to clarify, an ophthalmologist (an MD/DO) is the only one who should be performing these procedures.

Undoubtedly. However, a consultation with one's own optometrist may be good start before visiting a refractive surgery clinic.


User currently offlinebabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2063 times:

I believe in the UK the government is trying to stop laser eye treatments and cosmetic surgery being treated like a consumable product with special offers and glossy marketing.

At the end of the day any surgery is an operation and has to be considered as such and considering the risks involved.

It seems on here many people are happy with their eye treatments but for me any interference with my body has to be taken very very seriously. If it goes wrong it could have life changing consequences.


User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7146 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 2041 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 14):
Why? I had mine done at 1/2 price. Don't look at the price, look at the practice performing the surgery. In my case, the guys who did mine had been doing LASIK for 10 years before they did me.


That is my point exactly! I would not think about doing something just because a deal is out there. I would shop around and find the best doctor with the best reputation not the guy with a half off deal. If the good doctor has a good deal then fine but that is at the bottom of the list for a optional procedure like this.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineklm672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2441 posts, RR: 3
Reply 25, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2038 times:

Its not really a special more 30% off because I am an employee.

User currently offlineklm672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2441 posts, RR: 3
Reply 26, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2031 times:

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/eye/se...er_vision_correction/surgeons.aspx

Right now I have an appointment for the free consult with Dr. Millstein


User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 8872 posts, RR: 10
Reply 27, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2019 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 18):
13 years of no glasses, no contacts. 13 years of never having to think about my eyes or my vision. If there are no ill-effects 13 years out, I'm thinking it's safe to say that we're clear for 20 and 40 years.

I hope so for all who have it done. I just had cataract surgery. I was very reluctant to have it done, came through Ok so far. I was told to wait until I had no choice by my regular doctor of many years. He said, if you can cope, do not let anyone touch your eyes, until you cannot cope. I had a driving test coming up this year. My eye surgeon told me I could get by without fulltime glasses, just reading glass's. I told him that after working in a job that was very dangerous to ones eyes, that I would not think of going without glass's to protect my eye's. He said this was very common from men. I still believe what my Doctor told me, do not let anyone touch your eyes without there being a very big need. I do not think that vanity, nor the inconvenience of wearing glasses justifies such a risk. As my eye surgeon told me, there is always danger from eye surgery, always a chance of you being the 1%. I went to a very well known surgeon, I know friends who have had problems just recently from other eye centers. I count my blessings, because I had not other choice and I seem to be free of major problems.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4990 posts, RR: 19
Reply 28, posted (1 year 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1929 times:

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 19):

That wasn't Lasik, that would've been some form of RK (which according to Wikipedia was first performed by a Russian doctor in 1974)

You are correct. The first Lasix surgery was performed in 1989. So the people I knew had to have had RK.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineasuflyer05 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2371 posts, RR: 3
Reply 29, posted (1 year 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1806 times:

I had LASIK in February of this year. I experienced some of the usual side effects right after the surgery (dry eyes, starbursts around headlights at night, focus issues, etc.). But most have subsided. I am a little more sensitive to light, I was in Miami last week and I had to wear sunglasses during the day. But other than that the surgery was a success. I am very glad I had it done. I never experienced pain and I see 20/15 with both eyes now.

User currently offlineCdnCactus From Canada, joined Mar 2013, 167 posts, RR: 0
Reply 30, posted (1 year 4 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1751 times:

Had LASIK in 2004. No halo or any other side effect. Just had a check up and 9 years in, still 20/20 and problem free.

I did lots of research though, and went to a doctor with the best word of mouth who didn't (and still don't) advertise. He's not the cheapest but has no shortage of clients.


User currently offlinekingairta From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 458 posts, RR: 0
Reply 31, posted (1 year 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1591 times:

I know people who had it done and love it.

I looked into it as well. I decided not to. I wear glasses to see distance. I don't need them up close. I was told that if I had my eyes fixed I would require reading glasses afterwards. They offered to do mono vision where one eye is for distance and one eye for reading. Since I was looking to get away from glasses in the first place I decided not to get the surgery. I don't like the idea of monovision. The doc said my brain would adjust but It just doesn't sound like it's an optimal fix just a work around.


User currently offlinemirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 32, posted (1 year 4 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1554 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

I'm an eye doctor. Our office has handled laser refractive surgery since 1996. I do all the pre and post op work and work with several corneal surgeons.

My thoughts:

Quoting klm672 (Thread starter):
where I can get 30% off

If you have been looking at it for a while and this is an opportunity, I can see your interest.

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 1):
Who knows 20 years out? It is very easy to change glasses, surgery not so much. Remember with age can come other problems such as cataracts, very common.

Marguerite B. MacDonald MD performed the first human refractive laser eye surgery in 1989, so we have a lot of information moving forward. I am very fortunate to have met her and worked up patients with her.

That said, realize this....as a patient, you're thinking "who knows 20 years out." As an eye doctor, there's the woman I saw five hours ago who had a corneal ulcer as a result of sleeping in her contact lenses for 3 months straight. She is a danger to herself and as such, guess what? Laser eye surgery is THE best option since she abuses her eyes. She WILL do damage to her eyes in years of abusing contacts VS one LASIK procedure.


Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 3):
there are rare bad experiences that permanently affect vision, especially at night.

I am happy to report that my patients have not have any permanent effects. However, I have a very stringent LASIK candidate checklist to obtain before recommending it to our patients. It has served our patients well through the years. I can think of 3 patients right off the top of my head that I recommended should NOT have the surgery who went to other doctors, had it done, and are now having serious issues. Moral here? If you are a great candidate for the procedure, you have an excellent chance of successful results. If you are a borderline candidate, you want to know ahead of time that you may have issues that can be managed post surgically.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 4):
Thing is though, don´t go for the ones that seem more economically attractive. You need to do it with those who´ve done a lot and are more experienced.

And how does one get this information? Ask other eye doctors. Work of mouth is good but the problem her is that a happy/unhappy patient only has one experience. Talk to a few eye doctors who know the other docs in the area and they know who is good.

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 8):
He told me that since he was legally blind

The MOST irritating misconception....Your father is 100% wrong. Legally blind is a specific definition that people throw around...If one is LEGALLY BLIND, that means there is NO pair of glasses, contacts or eye surgery that can EVER bring back the vision better than 20/200 in the BETTER seeing eye. It is sadly permanent vision loss.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 11):
Just to clarify, an ophthalmologist (an MD/DO) is the only one who should be performing these procedures.

Depends on the state. Some Optometrists can perform the surgery, I think in Oklahoma IIRC? THe bottom line is that you need a skilled doctor.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 12):
20/20 in both eyes is very hard to achieve. I was lucky to be perfect in one eye. People often expect the impossible. Also note I had LASEK, not LASIK.

20/20 is pretty easy and 80% of our patients are 20/15 the very next day. With a LASEK, which is essentially LASIK without a flap or whats known as PRK, 20/20 is pretty easy to nail.

But you are correct that expectations are a serious consideration. I am very honest with people. If you are a type A personality, don't do LASIK in my office. Why? Its aggravating and frustrating for all involved if the surgery is a clinical success but the patient is unhappy over their expectation. 20/20 is just a number. I have some patients seeing 20/15 and STILL not happy in their glasses or contacts. They wont be happy with LASIK either...
I want a patient who is 20/"happy" It makes my profession so worthwhile.

Quoting zckls04 (Reply 12):
you educate yourself on all these things so you know precisely what you're expecting.



Seriously.

Quoting Geezer (Reply 17):
.pick a VERY, VERY experienced doctor, and talk to about a dozen of his patients FIRST.

Often not practical. But you REALLY should go to your current eye doctor who knows your eyes, needs and eye history so that you can make a more informed choice. I love discussing options, concerns and expectations with my patients. Have I taken the time to do so and found the patient go elsewhere for the surgery? Sure. And some of our patients will find a cheaper doctor. And that is their choice. But when it comes to materials, find a deal. When it comes to an elective eye surgery, I only recommend corneal surgeons out here. The result is years of happy patients and we can all sleep better at night.

Ah, just remembered another patient who decided that our corneal specialists were too expensive. She had surgery 3 years ago. Saw her again a few months ago, back in contacts and glasses....
Just she was saving $$ to buy more glasses and contacts later? Was that deal worthwhile?

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 19):
she consulted both of her cousins beforehand (each of them are ophthalmologists)

The best way to do it. Now, @ KLM672, you got the ball rolling. But talk to your eye doctor (who likely does not have a vested interest) and see if its right for you. And make sure that surgeon has done tons of surgeries. The bio you posted seems to show the youngest doc there. Personally, I'd like him to be sporting a bit of gray.  



Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
User currently offlinena From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10699 posts, RR: 9
Reply 33, posted (1 year 4 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1540 times:

The feedback seems quite promising. I also have a friend who had it done around the year 2000 and never heard her complain.
I have worn glasses since I´m 11. I´m shortsighted, about 2 right, and 3 left, so I´m not too blind. I do like wearing glasses so I never thought about Laser, only when reading became a bit difficult since about two years I asked my doctor, but she said it wouldnt work for me. Can remember exactly why.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Saffron Cake: Have You Had It? posted Tue Jan 3 2006 11:34:13 by Pe@rson
Les Miserables - Have You Seen It Yet? posted Sat Jan 19 2013 03:53:18 by kaitak
Have You Had Sleep Apnea Or Another Sleep Disorder posted Thu Oct 4 2012 11:41:56 by klm672
The Rarest Flower In The World! Have You Seen It? posted Fri Oct 8 2010 23:34:59 by cysafan
Financial Reform Bill - Have You Read It? posted Thu Apr 15 2010 23:54:23 by MoltenRock
How Many Surgeries Have You Had posted Fri Aug 10 2007 02:50:41 by MCOflyer
How Many Cars Have You Had An Accident With posted Wed May 16 2007 13:28:56 by Runway23
Have You Had Your Tonsils Taken Out? posted Mon Dec 25 2006 02:46:12 by Futuresdpdcop
Friday's Stupid Thread - Have You Seen It? posted Fri Jun 2 2006 07:32:12 by UTA_flyinghigh
Have You Had ... posted Mon May 29 2006 11:28:56 by Cabso1