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Your Favorite Word In Your Language?  
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7560 posts, RR: 18
Posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2701 times:

Random random I know, but I thought it'd be fun to talk about this.

What is the word you like saying the most in your native language (or any language you speak) ??

For example, I love the word "snafu." it's so funny, how it's pronounced. Snaffffuuuuu....haha

In Japanese, I love the word "oppai....." for obvious reasons  

Random thread, I know, but it's 10PM here and I'm bored.

Your turn, Airliners 


次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
58 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFaddyPainter From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2010, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2690 times:

"Thruppence" has got to be up there for me, just rolls off the tongue nicely.

P.S this thread is quite pointless  


User currently offlineDarksnowynight From United States of America, joined Jan 2012, 1361 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2674 times:

Inexorable.






  



Posting without Knowledge is simply Tolerated Vandalism... We are the Vandals.
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2825 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2663 times:

I think it's fair to say that "putain" is the favourite word of the French people, me included. There is barely not one sentence I say without this word. It is a bad word meaning "b*tch" in French, but it has become an element of language. It doesn't shock people anymore. You can say it in full or you can use the shortened "'p'tain" or just "'tain".

I came across this YouTube video not too long ago. I think it sums up pretty well the use of this word: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSeaDQ6sPs0



"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 885 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2643 times:

Bollocks and/or bolloxology.

Hale and pace - The Bollocks Song

In fact I'm thinking of getting a bolloxometer fitted to my TV so that everytime any politician, anywhere in the world, expresses an opinion on anything at all, it automatically changes channel.

  



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently onlinetravelavnut From Netherlands, joined May 2010, 1612 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2631 times:

Not my mother tongue, but my favorite English word is succulent 


Live From Amsterdam!
User currently offlineakiss20 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 609 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2625 times:

Kerfuffle or Fisticuffs, can't decide


Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 7, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2598 times:

Disembark which is sadly being bastadised the by the horrible deplane  

User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 8, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2594 times:
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I think 'rambunctious' is a great word.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineAM744 From Mexico, joined Jun 2001, 1779 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2564 times:

Libertad

F
I
L
L
E
R


User currently offlineAF1624 From France, joined Jul 2006, 659 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2545 times:

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 3):
It is a bad word meaning "b*tch" in French

Actually, bitch would be translated as "chienne".

Just the way the English can use "bitch" litteraly to define a female dog; or a very libertine girl/woman; we use "chienne" to refer to a female dog - or a very libertine girl/woman.

The actual translation of "putain" would be "whore". Not "prostitute", "whore".

But, admittedly, you were close enough and I'm just being a bit of an ass.

My favourite French word would be... merde. I don't say it that much, but when I do, it usually means I'm getting really serious. I will use "putain" many, many times - and not actually mean it. But "merde" as a certain strength to it, a certain thickness.



Cheers
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6203 posts, RR: 30
Reply 11, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2537 times:
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Spanish: Consuetudinario

English: nincompoop

French: voyage

Portuguese: Carioca



MGGS
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2825 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2526 times:

Quoting AF1624 (Reply 10):
The actual translation of "putain" would be "whore". Not "prostitute", "whore".

I stand corrected 
Quoting AF1624 (Reply 10):
you were close enough and I'm just being a bit of an ass.

Nah, you're just being French 



"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlinebhill From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 971 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2514 times:

Reciprocity ........


Carpe Pices
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15740 posts, RR: 27
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2511 times:

Defenestrate is the best word in the English language.


Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5595 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2511 times:

Rythm

.

Quoting OA260 (Reply 7):
deplane

Isn't that one of the primary services offered at Marana, Victorville, and Davis-Monthan etc?  
.
Quoting bhill (Reply 13):
Reciprocity ........

"Variable, this is Knife, over ....."

Tugg

[Edited 2013-04-23 11:06:10]


I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlinezckls04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 1374 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2504 times:

Obloquoy is a good one.

But bollards is my favorite.



If you're not sure whether to use a piece of punctuation, it's best not to.
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20636 posts, RR: 62
Reply 17, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2488 times:

Free.

Quoting travelavnut (Reply 5):
succulent

Good word. Especially if used to describe a top sirloin on my plate.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3474 posts, RR: 17
Reply 18, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2485 times:
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I like the Arabic word SALAM we use when greeting somebody or saying goodbye it works both ways
Also we can say salam aleikom which means peace be on you.
BTW Hebrew language have the same word SHALOM.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlinekpitrrat From United States of America, joined Oct 2011, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2459 times:

Shenanigans!

Not sure if it is technically a "real" word but its my fav.

HEY FARVA!


User currently offlinemoose135 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2322 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2452 times:

Obtuse...

Filler
Filler
Filler



KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2403 posts, RR: 13
Reply 21, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2436 times:

French: néansmoins

Swiss German dialect: Schofseckel


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently onlinelh526 From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 2363 posts, RR: 14
Reply 22, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2434 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Habseligkeiten is a beautiful word in Germany .. as is Heimat


Trittst im Morgenrot daher, seh ich dich im Strahlenmeer ...
User currently onlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3305 posts, RR: 13
Reply 23, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2428 times:
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Quoting PHX787 (Thread starter):

For example, I love the word "snafu." it's so funny, how it's pronounced. Snaffffuuuuu....haha

I presume you know "snafu" is actually a military acronym? Along with "fubar" and "bohica", which come from similar lines, some military slang really is pretty hilarious and cool.

As for my favorite words:

ENGLISH: "RADAR" - Think about how RADAR works. Now look at RADAR backwards. In being a palindrom, the word itself represents its function! Brilliant (though unintentional, I'm sure). ("Liquid" is another just because of how elegantly is rolls off the tongue.)

FRENCH: "BORDEL" - Literally, it means "brothel" but it's used as an expletive mostly. (Another favorite is "shampooing" just because I always thought it was an actual French word when I was little. Took my forever to realize it was just a bastardized pronunciation of a fake English word.)

GREEK: Sadly, I don't know enough Greek anymore to have a favorite word, but "TAVERNA" is a favorite just because of its meaning ("Tavern") and the memories it brings back of my trips to Greece.

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5595 posts, RR: 8
Reply 24, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2424 times:

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 23):
Sadly, I don't know enough Greek anymore to have a favorite word,

Well for Greek, for me it would have to be Uzo....   (Yes, I do like it, with some ice to "smoke" it and Pistachio's).

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 25, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2457 times:

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 23):
GREEK:

I like Ανακυκλώνω / Anakiklono which means to recycle.

Quoting tugger (Reply 24):
Uzo..

Ouzo  


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 26, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2468 times:
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Достопримечательность is a Russian word often viewed as pleasant by both foreigners and Russians alike. It has a nice rhythm and feel to it (stress on the fifth syllable so with a nice rise and fall) - dostoprimechatel'nost'. It means an attraction or sight, as in sightseeing. For example - v Londone mnogo interesnykh dostoprimechatel'nostei - there are many interesting sights/places worth visiting/seeing in London. Nice word.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5595 posts, RR: 8
Reply 27, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2483 times:

Quoting OA260 (Reply 25):
Quoting tugger (Reply 24):
Uzo..

Ouzo

     
Thanks, I should know better, my bad.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6651 posts, RR: 11
Reply 28, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2455 times:

In French I like "con", again an expletive with sexual origins, the con being the woman's lower parts. Similar to cunt, except that twist that a "con" is a man not a woman, since the word is masculine. Also, far less offensive since very used, but depending on the situation it still is, when president Sarkozy used it against a man it caused a controversy, even leading recently to the country being sanctioned by the ECHR because a man had been condemned for using it against Sarkozy !

Many poems, songs and satire have been written around it, including famous songs by Brassens and Gainsbourg :

Brassens - Le temps ne fait rien à l'affaire : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gznDOMKeWkA

Gainsbourg - Requiem pour un con : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vJvwD3XADc

In southern France it goes along with "putain" and can be used to start or finish any sentence by "putain, con".



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 29, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2433 times:
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Quoting Aesma (Reply 28):
In French I like "con", again an expletive with sexual origins, the con being the woman's lower parts. Similar to cunt, except that twist that a "con" is a man not a woman, since the word is masculine. Also, far less offensive since very used, but depending on the situation it still is

As in "tu parles des conneries"?  



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25247 posts, RR: 85
Reply 30, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2430 times:
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Quoting offloaded (Reply 4):
Bollocks and/or bolloxology.

  

Also: Discombobulate. Stocious. Doolallly.

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineBananaboy From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 1578 posts, RR: 22
Reply 31, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2429 times:

Gusset is a good one.

Mark



All my life, I've been kissing, your top lip 'cause your bottom one's missing
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 32, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2422 times:
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Moist.

Also - Flange.

Hey, those two kind of go together!  



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5710 posts, RR: 31
Reply 33, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2412 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 32):
Moist. Also - Flange. Hey, those two kind of go together!

Oh dear. I can see where this thread is heading . . . (didn't you mean to type "separate" instead of "together", there, btw )

Can't think of any word in English at the mo, but in German it has to be "Hottentottenpotentatentantenatentaeter"


User currently offlinesebolino From France, joined May 2001, 3681 posts, RR: 4
Reply 34, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2397 times:

I wouldn't say that it's my favorite, but i like to use the word "certes". It means "yes" or "I agree", but with a touch of classicism   The opposite of slang.

User currently offlineSmittyOne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 35, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2352 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 14):

Defenestrate is the best word in the English language.

Concur, and we could use some more of it besides.

My nomination for second place would be 'douchebag'. The French get 2/3 credit by the letter on that one I guess.


User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3863 posts, RR: 1
Reply 36, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2339 times:

huh, duh, umm and hmmm...


In a.net emoticons: Same order as above...

 Confused  Yeah sure  boggled   scratchchin 

[Edited 2013-04-23 17:32:29]


Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineCplKlinger From United States of America, joined Oct 2010, 170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 37, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2338 times:

Indubitably, followed closely by facetious for English.

Spanish: caliente

Klingon: nga'chuq


User currently offlineusflyer msp From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 38, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2323 times:

my favorite english word is dingleberries. i find it so hilarious that we would have a word to describe that...

User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3863 posts, RR: 1
Reply 39, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2320 times:

Quoting usflyer msp (Reply 38):

They're football players from University of West Virginia.




Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlinetz757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2868 posts, RR: 6
Reply 40, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2295 times:

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 39):
University of West Virginia

As an alum, it's West Virginia University. And yes, that photo is hilarious.

My favorite word is catawampus.



LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineHOMSaR From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 1183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 41, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2283 times:

I really want to hear you say the word....



...passport.


Four and a half points if you get the reference.



I was raised by a cup of coffee.
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39880 posts, RR: 74
Reply 42, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2251 times:

English - lush

Spanish - guapa

Thai - porn
(means blessing or could be any fruit from a tree)



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3863 posts, RR: 1
Reply 43, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2229 times:

Chicano:

órale

vato

ese

¡wassápenin!



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineAF1624 From France, joined Jul 2006, 659 posts, RR: 0
Reply 44, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2186 times:

Quoting sebolino (Reply 34):
but i like to use the word "certes"

Well-used, "certes" can become one of the most beautiful replies out there.

I will quote a classic French movie, "Les Visiteurs":

"- Je vous ennuie?
- Certes."

Bwahahahahahah.

Roughly translated as:

"- Am I boring you?
- Indeed."

But you have to see the movie for it to be funny.



Cheers
User currently onlinetravelavnut From Netherlands, joined May 2010, 1612 posts, RR: 7
Reply 45, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2175 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 17):
Quoting travelavnut (Reply 5):
succulent

Good word. Especially if used to describe a top sirloin on my plate.

And that is exactely why I love that word. Not only is succulent almost synonomous for delicious, it actually sounds like its meaning. Just speaking the word makes my mouth water 
Quoting SmittyOne (Reply 35):
Concur, and we could use some more of it besides

I concur!



Live From Amsterdam!
User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7957 posts, RR: 12
Reply 46, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2152 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 33):
in German it has to be "Hottentottenpotentatentantenatentaeter

Then maybe you'll like "Torschlußpanik" (or make it Torschlusspanik) as well. That's the panic you feel and that sometimes overwhelms you when the gates of time are closing (lit.: gates-closing-panic) and you fear that a once-in-a-lifetime change is about to fly over your head. A typical example would be a woman talking to a friend that she will soon turn 35 and wants kids but doesn't even have a beau while gnawing her nails.
It is not a tapeworm-word like the one you mentioned, but it is particularly difficult to translate.

I for one like "Quatsch". That's a German equivalent for "bollocks" but Quatsch or "Ach Quatsch!" simply sounds better, so there.



I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 47, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2128 times:

In Plattdeutsch a word that is a term of endearment, despite the literal translation:

Schietbüddel.

Verklaartüddeln is another good one meaning to explain or make clear.


User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5710 posts, RR: 31
Reply 48, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2104 times:

Quoting NoUFO (Reply 46):
Then maybe you'll like "Torschlußpanik"

Nice one, and I hadn't heard it before, but then my German is pretty basic. I love the way other languages have words that have no equivalent in English, and the German ones that come to mind are "schadenfreude" (although that's common in English now) and "gemuetlich", or, even better "gemuetlichkeit", and "doppelgaenger" (again common in English now).


User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7560 posts, RR: 18
Reply 49, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 2092 times:

Quoting FaddyPainter (Reply 1):
P.S this thread is quite pointless

Says the guy that DIDN'T create a thread with 40+ replies in less than 24 hours   
Quoting offloaded (Reply 4):
Bollocks and/or bolloxology.
Quoting AM744 (Reply 9):
F
I
L
L
E
R

I never thought this would be anyone's favorite word   

Quoting AR385 (Reply 11):
nincompoop

....thanks. I needed that lol

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 17):
Quoting travelavnut (Reply 5):
succulent

Good word. Especially if used to describe a top sirloin on my plate.

or the top sirloin in my pants when I see two top sirloins in some cute japanese girls' chests     (sorry I'm drunk)

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 36):
huh, duh, umm and hmmm...


In a.net emoticons: Same order as above...

Confused Yeah sure boggled scratchchin

LOL

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 39):
Quoting usflyer msp (Reply 38):

They're football players from University of West Virginia.

  



次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
User currently onlinelh526 From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 2363 posts, RR: 14
Reply 50, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2063 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

The word container ... now that's a marvelous one as it describes exactly what it is ... an object that contains something ... a receptacle for all sorts of things .... a Container  


Trittst im Morgenrot daher, seh ich dich im Strahlenmeer ...
User currently offlineFaddyPainter From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2010, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 51, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2058 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 49):
Says the guy that DIDN'T create a thread with 40+ replies in less than 24 hours

I think we must have quite differing views on what a pointless thread is  


User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20636 posts, RR: 62
Reply 52, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2047 times:

Quoting FaddyPainter (Reply 51):
I think we must have quite differing views on what a pointless thread is

Or how many uses there are for top sirloin.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineFaddyPainter From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2010, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 53, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2037 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 52):
Or how many uses there are for top sirloin.

Depends if it's beef or horse. You never can tell these days.   


User currently offlineAviRaider From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 54, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2035 times:

I like onomatopoeia (pronounced: on-uh-mat-uh-pee-uh). It defines words that are spelt the way they are sounded. Like wow, and honk, boom.

User currently offline747srule From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 429 posts, RR: 0
Reply 55, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1962 times:

I think my favorite would be antithesis.It just sounds so scholarly.


Jesus is the way,the truth,and the life
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2403 posts, RR: 13
Reply 56, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1931 times:

Another one from me: Hapaxlegomenon.


It is used in linguistics, for example when somebody wants to know if a text has been tinkered with.


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineBirdwatching From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 3822 posts, RR: 51
Reply 57, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1874 times:

Here's a word I love:

Celestial. It sounds beautiful.

Soren   



All the things you probably hate about travelling are warm reminders that I'm home
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11651 posts, RR: 15
Reply 58, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1848 times:

Quoting akiss20 (Reply 6):
Kerfuffle

HA! I like that one too!

Quoting tugger (Reply 15):
Rythm

You may have forgotten an "h" as in: rhythm.

My favorite word is nifty. Any of those 1920s words I like. But, nifty because I used it to make my youngest brother mad when he was in Kindergarten. He hated that word so much he would try, with his little 5 year old might, to punch me. It's a brother thing.

But, the word above all words, even above "kerfuffle" and "nifty" that I love the most with no question:

yes



Life in the wall is a drag.
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