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Programming Languages  
User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1611 times:

Hello, just wanted to know who our fellow computer programmers are!

These are the languages that I use:

  • C/C++/C# : Algorithms and Arduino
  • Delphi : Remote Administration Tools  
  • z80 Assembly : Optimizing calculator programs
  • FORTRAN : Computational programs
  • Wealthscript : Programming strategies
  • Basic/Ti-Basic : Mostly for my calculators and collection of Basic stamp boards
  • R : AP Statistics and data analysis

  • I recently started learning R from a book and several online resources.

    Planning on dual majoring in Math and Computer Science in college. If anyone holds a CS and/or Math major and would like to give me advice while I'm in college that'd be great!  

    35 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
     
    User currently offlineBraniff747SP From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 2972 posts, RR: 1
    Reply 1, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1610 times:

    I did a term's worth of Java last year. Interesting, but mind boggling--I should go back and take a look to see how much I remember.


    The 747 will always be the TRUE queen of the skies!
    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 2, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1582 times:

    Weird, I can't edit the above post....

    I meant to say that they teach only Java for
    User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3623 posts, RR: 5
    Reply 3, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1563 times:

    I've done Java, C, Basic and Prolog at university level (Computer Science). Right now for work I mostly use SQL and do some PL/SQL here and there as my job is data-heavy.

    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 4, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1550 times:

    Quoting lewis (Reply 3):

    I've done Java, C, Basic and Prolog at university level (Computer Science). Right now for work I mostly use SQL and do some PL/SQL here and there as my job is data-heavy.

    What kind of work do you do?


    User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3048 posts, RR: 8
    Reply 5, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1533 times:

    Java user here. I've also dabbled with C, C++, Matlab, Prolog, Python, and Ferret (a Matlab version inside the PMEL).


    "You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
    User currently offlinecasinterest From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4568 posts, RR: 2
    Reply 6, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1518 times:

    Java, C/C++. Pascal ,Perl and a few old languages. Got my BS in Computer Engineering. Been there, done that with a lot of computer systems.


    Older than I just was ,and younger than I will soo be.
    User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7867 posts, RR: 52
    Reply 7, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1508 times:

    TI-83/84 Basic (vs Assembly)... if that even counts  


    Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
    User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2652 posts, RR: 3
    Reply 8, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1505 times:

    SNOBOL, ALGOL, Lisp, Ada....

    Nothing else   



    Pancakes are delicious.
    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 9, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1494 times:

    Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 7):

    TI-83/84 Basic (vs Assembly)... if that even counts

    It's a language so it counts!  
    Did you learn it from spending countless hours messing with your calculator during class?

    Quoting Airstud (Reply 8):

    SNOBOL, ALGOL, Lisp, Ada....

    "Network dude" What exactly do you do? o.o


    User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7867 posts, RR: 52
    Reply 10, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1487 times:

    Quoting Jyang772 (Reply 9):
    Did you learn it from spending countless hours messing with your calculator during class?

    YES. lol, sounds like you may have done the same  

    I actually got extremely good at Basic. Never had the patience to learn Assembly, but I toyed with it a bit. Omnicalc gave some Assembly functions to Basic programs... oh high school......



    Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
    User currently offlinenighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5134 posts, RR: 33
    Reply 11, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1445 times:

    Dabbled with a lot of languages, including COMAL, Basic, Delphi, C++ and Java.

    Nowadays I mainly use C# for ASP.NET development, but also occasionally PHP and Visual Basic. This week I have been writing some VB6 code - old languages never die (they just GOSUB with no RETURN, as they say!)



    That'll teach you
    User currently offlinebeowulf From Singapore, joined Jul 2003, 730 posts, RR: 14
    Reply 12, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1436 times:

    Quoting Jyang772 (Thread starter):
    I recently started learning R from a book and several online resources.

    Could you share the book and online sources you are using to learn R.


    User currently onlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2364 posts, RR: 13
    Reply 13, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1424 times:

    Beginner level in JavaScript, Java, Perl, Pascal.

    For the daily work, I program stuff in R, like reading out my huge database about social contact patterns, and then drawing diagrams showing where people commute from and to.

    In my free time, I enjoy solving some http://projecteuler.net/ problems with R here and there.



    David



    Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
    User currently offlineoly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6696 posts, RR: 11
    Reply 14, posted (1 year 3 months 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1422 times:

    Mostly LabView these days, for data acquisition and experimental control, but in a previous existence most programming was in Delphi/Pascal with occasional forays into C#


    wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
    User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6591 posts, RR: 9
    Reply 15, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1386 times:

    As a young kid I learned some BASIC at a computing class taught near home, really forward thinking in the 80's, but unfortunately not followed later so I forgot everything. Then later I messed with my calculators like you, except that for a long time I had a casio so I used whatever language that was, I remember typing a whole level of Mario I found on the web. My best friend had a HP calculator and that thing drove me crazy with its Reverse Polish BS.

    When I got to study engineering Ti was the brand of choice so I got a 92+ and learned a few tricks, but by that time I could just download stuff and send it to the calculator with a cable, and exchange lessons with others, no real need for programming. Then in various schools I dabbled in many languages, especially at a school where all the courses were one language or another, maths, and English. But basically I wasn't inventive enough or studious enough so I wouldn't say I master any. When I need a small script to do something I can manage that, and that's about it.



    New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
    User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 13
    Reply 16, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1380 times:

    C almost exclusively.

    Java, and assembler for a variety of machines, rarely.

    I don't write much SQL for real-world use any more, but given that the C is for an RDBMS, I certainly see enough of it. QUEL, not so much.



    Fly, you fools! Fly!
    User currently offlineplanewasted From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 516 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 17, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1372 times:

    The ones I know for real and have earned money by writing is:
    Picoblaze assembly
    8 bit AVR assembly
    C/C++

    and not really programming languages:
    VHDL
    Verilog

    Then I have some basic knowledge in most of the "common" languages also. But I think I'm pretty bad att programming, my real skills are in hardware design.


    User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
    Reply 18, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1318 times:

    Got my BS in CS in 1976 -- so I've been a "paid" programmer for 37 years, plus another 5 years before that for "fun".

    There are all sorts of jobs in programming -- for example:
    - system/network admins who do a little programming to help them get their job done
    - consultants who do contract programming for a variety of clients and applications
    - "pure" programmers who usually focus on in-house or commercially offered software
    - many others

    It's not possible to say that one is better or preferable to another since that very much depends on personal interests.
    It also depends somewhat on long-terms goals: management vs. technical.

    I've been a "pure" programmer for most of my career with a very technical focus. In order to remain technical over a long career in a senior position it's likely you'd have to work for a larger company or government organization. Smaller companies tend to rely more heavily on junior staff. There's also a greater reliance on off-shore staff these days.

    It's much easier to find a good-paying jobs in network/system admin or contract programming than it is in pure programming simply because there's greater demand. It can be difficult, for example after a RIF, for a pure programmer to find a new job quickly (except of course in Silicon Valley).

    The math degree probably won't help much unless your interested in a career at a big corporate or government research lab -- and if that's your goal you might be better off with an MS than two BS's.

    I've done all sorts of programming from embedded intel 4004s, to IBM mainframes, to enterprise-class server arrays. Mostly Java these days, but I've done C++, Fortran, COBOL, PL/I, APL, and just about everything there is -- even SNOBOL! It's easier to make a switch early in your career (especially when there are no family obligations) , so explore different environments while you're able.


    User currently offlinecybergus From Venezuela, joined Mar 2006, 508 posts, RR: 9
    Reply 19, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1316 times:

    Let's see... Back in my school days:

    C/C++
    Java
    SPIM (Machine Readable)
    F#
    Fortran
    SQL Server, My SQL and Oracle
    HTML, Php
    Prolog (Only once and hated it)

    Now at my work:

    Powerbuilder
    C#
    SQL Server
    Javascript



    LAN Excellence in Flight
    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 20, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1314 times:

    Quoting beowulf (Reply 12):
    Could you share the book and online sources you are using to learn R.

    Here's a list of what I've used to learn R.
    -A copy of R for Dummies for free.
    -R Inferno pdf
    -Stackoverflow.com
    -stats.stackexchange.com
    -Quick R (great for more advanced topics)


    User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3623 posts, RR: 5
    Reply 21, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1299 times:

    Quoting Jyang772 (Reply 4):
    What kind of work do you do?

    I am in consulting and work on Forensic Accounting. Mostly deal with litigation work and fraud/FCPA investigations.


    User currently offlinerwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2338 posts, RR: 2
    Reply 22, posted (1 year 3 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1237 times:
    Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

    Learn a functional language. Easiest choices as Haskell or F# (Windows only, of course).

    And at the end of the day, languages are just tools, and that if a particular language meets the requirements of the task at hand best (and "best" covers everything from technical to economic to political reasons), it shouldn't matter too much whether or not you're an "expert" in it, so long as you have sufficient familiarity with the paradigm, it should be no more than a brief time to get rolling in a new language. In most cases you'll need more time to get up to speed with the local idioms for whatever language is in use.

    Of course there are certain tasks where a deep familiarity with a language is a requirement, but they're a quite small fraction of programming tasks.


    User currently offlineYokoTsuno From Singapore, joined Feb 2011, 348 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 23, posted (1 year 3 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1179 times:

    I do C,C++ and C# and if you consider these programming languages VHDL, Verilog and MatLab as well.

    Mostly technical applications, which include Windows and Unix kernel drivers, base band DSP, GUI platforms (QT, MFC, GTK) for DVB, DTMB, Wimax, LAN and other types of receivers. Also some experience on GSM/CDMA/MPEG at protocol level, and real-time applications on OSE.


    User currently offlineDIJKKIJK From France, joined Jul 2003, 1791 posts, RR: 4
    Reply 24, posted (1 year 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1169 times:

    These days I'm mostly into C++.

    In the past I've dabbled with Perl, Python and C. Little bit of Java too.

    In college I learned C, COBOL, FORTRAN and Pascal.

    Quoting Jyang772 (Thread starter):
    Planning on dual majoring in Math and Computer Science in college. If anyone holds a CS and/or Math major and would like to give me advice while I'm in college that'd be great

    That is a good combination of majors. If you work hard and get good grades, you won't have to worry about your career.

    If you can, try to focus on topics like mathematical modelling or data analysis. There is lots of demand for people who are good at these things.



    Never argue with idiots. They will bring you down to their level, and beat you with experience.
    User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12422 posts, RR: 25
    Reply 25, posted (1 year 3 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1164 times:

    I was in high school in the 70s and uni in the 80s and software engineer ever since.

    Key languages:

    70s: BASIC, FORTRAN
    80s: FORTRAN, Pascal (Turbo Pascal, anyone?), C
    90s: C, heavy use of shell and awk scripting
    00s: C then Java for five years
    10s: C, Perl, R

    Interesting to see others picking up R.

    I've used a book called 'R in Action' which is mostly a 'learn by doing' book.

    http://www.amazon.com/R-Action-Rober...975086&sr=8-1&keywords=r+in+action

    Then lots of googling to fill in the blanks...

    Sadly we don't seem to get proper training these days so one must pick things up on the fly.

    Next up for me: PHP.



    Inspiration, move me brightly!
    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 26, posted (1 year 3 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1128 times:

    Quoting Revelation (Reply 25):
    Interesting to see others picking up R.

    I've used a book called 'R in Action' which is mostly a 'learn by doing' book.

    http://www.amazon.com/R-Action-Rober...975086&sr=8-1&keywords=r+in+action

    I'm waiting for the Coursera course on R which will start in September. But, by then I think I will already be learning more advanced topics.

    This course is four weeks long.
    https://www.coursera.org/course/compdata


    User currently offlinecmf From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
    Reply 27, posted (1 year 3 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1132 times:

    It amazes me how few list the butter and bread of web development, php and java script.

    User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12422 posts, RR: 25
    Reply 28, posted (1 year 3 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1072 times:

    Quoting cmf (Reply 27):
    It amazes me how few list the butter and bread of web development, php and java script.

    I've always been a 'systems programmer' so have avoided the 'dancing baloney' side of the world.

    I had a bad experience early on in my career developing user interfaces. Long story short, there were too many cooks in the kitchen. Since then I've avoided things that get evaluated subjectively as much as possible.

    Am learning enough PHP to glue in a few of my system tools to a web server so the young'uns will use them.



    Inspiration, move me brightly!
    User currently offlineCalebWilliams From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 308 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 29, posted (1 year 3 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1049 times:

    Only web stuff, so: HTML and CSS (okay, not programming languages, but markups) and then just a tiny bit of JavaScript and PHP for the hardcore (read: very simple) stuff.


    Caleb Williams MSP AUS STL AMS CPH LGW YYZ
    User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 13
    Reply 30, posted (1 year 3 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 1026 times:

    Quoting cmf (Reply 27):
    It amazes me how few list the butter and bread of web development, php and java script.

    I guess there aren't too many web developer types here then. For myself, once the row leaves the DBMS server and heads out to the client app, I couldn't care less what is done with it.  



    Fly, you fools! Fly!
    User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8468 posts, RR: 2
    Reply 31, posted (1 year 3 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 976 times:

    Quoting DIJKKIJK (Reply 24):

    If you can, try to focus on topics like mathematical modelling or data analysis. There is lots of demand for people who are good at these things.

                  

    And don't just study it. Do it. Download R. Find some data. Get cracking on it.

    = $$$.


    User currently offlineAM744 From Mexico, joined Jun 2001, 1776 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 32, posted (1 year 3 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 961 times:

    In school: Z80 assembler, Pascal, Motorola microcontroller (can't remember the model, maybe 6800), Prolog, lots of C, Java

    Professionally: mostly Java, PL/SQL, some C.

    Worth learning from here on IMHO: Scala, HTML5, serious JavaScript (jQuery)

    Quoting Revelation (Reply 28):
    I had a bad experience early on in my career developing user interfaces. Long story short, there were too many cooks in the kitchen. Since then I've avoided things that get evaluated subjectively as much as possible.

       I hear you clear and loud.


    User currently offlineJyang772 From United States of America, joined May 2013, 20 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 33, posted (1 year 3 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 923 times:

    Quoting Flighty (Reply 31):
    And don't just study it. Do it. Download R. Find some data. Get cracking on it.

    = $$$.

    I've been messing around with R a lot lately. :P


    User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12422 posts, RR: 25
    Reply 34, posted (1 year 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 897 times:

    Quoting Jyang772 (Reply 26):
    I'm waiting for the Coursera course on R which will start in September.

    Am currently taking Intro to Stats https://class.coursera.org/introstats-001/class/index along with 40,000 others!  

    It's the last week so I don't know you can join or not.

    It's something of a refresh since I took stats in uni in the early 80s, but then again we didn't have R back then.

    The course isn't about R, but they use some aspects of R and they have a grad assistant show you how to do the R stuff in separate videos.

    I actually started the course you provided above but I had a crunch at work so I didn't finish it. It does go pretty quickly so it's a good idea to know some stats ahead of time and to have some project in mind so you can work on that as you take the class.

    My day job is a sea of numbers so these areas are definitely worth my time.



    Inspiration, move me brightly!
    User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12422 posts, RR: 25
    Reply 35, posted (1 year 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 895 times:

    Quoting Flighty (Reply 31):
    Quoting DIJKKIJK (Reply 24):

    If you can, try to focus on topics like mathematical modelling or data analysis. There is lots of demand for people who are good at these things.

    And don't just study it. Do it. Download R. Find some data. Get cracking on it.

    Ref: https://class.coursera.org/datasci-001/class/index - Intro to Data Science, on Coursera.

    Currently four weeks in out of 8.



    Inspiration, move me brightly!
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