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Mt. St. Helens  
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11649 posts, RR: 15
Posted (1 year 4 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1935 times:

"Vancouver, Vancouver! This is it!"

33 years ago today.

My birthday is Wednesday. This has stuck with me ever since. A mountain blew up, 50+ people died. Four days later is my birthday. Every year, on this day, my mind is still reeling. Someone help me put this in perspective.


Life in the wall is a drag.
23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineouboy79 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 4599 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (1 year 4 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1921 times:

Crazy it's been that long already. Before the earthquake and eruption that destroyed the mountain, it was a very beautiful mountain. Amazing how when things just comes together at the right time (earthquake that caused the side to collapse into the magma chamber that set off the main explosion) how it can change the face of the landscape.

The flip side we also get to see the Earth rebuild itself as Mt St Helens has shown with the relatively new lava domes.

Mt Rainier is the one I worry about most though. I wonder how many actually realize it is a volcano.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39875 posts, RR: 74
Reply 2, posted (1 year 4 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1915 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
33 years ago today.

It happened on my birthday.
I turned 7 years old 33 years ago today....


I remember Mt St. Helens in the news back then too.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11649 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (1 year 4 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

Quoting ouboy79 (Reply 1):
Mt Rainier is the one I worry about most though. I wonder how many actually realize it is a volcano.

I think people think "Oh, that can't happen here..."

Like with Mt. Hood and Mt. Shasta. All the Cascades are volcanos.

I guess because I was in Portland when it happened, that has a great impact on me.



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13113 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (1 year 4 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1821 times:

I visited the area in 1995 and 2004. My parents were in the area about 1 year after it blew up, they saw is more raw from what I saw. I found my visits to the area fascinating, it is amazing to see the power of nature from a powerful volcano.

User currently offlineouboy79 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 4599 posts, RR: 22
Reply 5, posted (1 year 4 months 22 hours ago) and read 1769 times:

Quoting seb146 (Reply 3):
I think people think "Oh, that can't happen here..."

Like with Mt. Hood and Mt. Shasta. All the Cascades are volcanos.

Exactly. People don't realize there are at least 30 volcanoes in WA, OR, and ID alone. At least ones that are actively monitored.


User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20629 posts, RR: 62
Reply 6, posted (1 year 4 months 22 hours ago) and read 1756 times:

Quoting seb146 (Reply 3):
Like with Mt. Hood and Mt. Shasta. All the Cascades are volcanos.

Isn't Mt. Rainier the one with the most likelihood to blow next? Not like it's imminent or anything, but it's still considered as an active volcano.

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Someone help me put this in perspective.

Mother Nature is a powerful force. I was tossed out of bed during the '94 Northridge quake, but I don't dwell on it. Couldn't even tell you the date it happened beyond the year.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineGuitrThree From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (1 year 4 months 20 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

Quoting Superfly (Reply 2):
It happened on my birthday.
I turned 7 years old 33 years ago today....

My 18th? My birthday too! I, however, was 12.

I remember the news, but never placed it with my birthday.

Happy Birthday Fly!



As Seen On FlightRadar24! Radar ==> F-KBNA5
User currently offlineHOmSaR From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 1183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 4 months 19 hours ago) and read 1677 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
Someone help me put this in perspective.

Maybe this will help:

http://youtu.be/buqtdpuZxvk



I was raised by a cup of coffee.
User currently offlinekiwirob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7361 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (1 year 4 months 19 hours ago) and read 1669 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
A mountain blew up, 50+ people died. Four days later is my birthday. Every year, on this day, my mind is still reeling. Someone help me put this in perspective.

50 people isn't a lot in the general scheme of natural disasters, if it was hundreds or thousands like many others then I could get your point, but 50 meh. On my birthday the interisland ferry the Wahine sank, 53 people died, on the same day as I was born an aircraft crashed in Basel killing 104 people, I can't see why you need perspective on such an event.

Some other interesting things which happened on your birthday which might interest you:

334 BC – The Macedonian army of Alexander the Great defeats Darius III of Persia in the Battle of the Granicus.

1455 – Wars of the Roses: at the First Battle of St Albans, Richard, Duke of York, defeats and captures King Henry VI of England.

1826 – HMS Beagle departs on its first voyage.

1906 – The Wright brothers are granted U.S. patent number 821,393 for their "Flying-Machine".

1915 – Three trains collide in the Quintinshill rail crash near Gretna Green, Scotland, killing 227 people and injuring 246; the accident is found to be the result of non-standard operating practices during a shift change at a busy junction.

1939 – World War II: Germany and Italy sign the Pact of Steel.

1958 – Sri Lankan riots of 1958: This riot is a watershed event in the race relationship of the various ethnic communities of Sri Lanka. The total number of deaths is estimated to be 300, mostly Sri Lankan Tamils.

1962 – Continental Airlines Flight 11 crashes after bombs explode on board.

1964 – U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announces the goals of his Great Society social reforms to bring an "end to poverty and racial injustice" in America.

1967 – The L'Innovation department store in the centre of Brussels, Belgium, burns down. It is the most devastating fire in Belgian history, resulting in 323 dead and missing and 150 injured.

1968 – The nuclear-powered submarine the USS Scorpion sinks with 99 men aboard 400 miles southwest of the Azores.

1980 – Namco releases the highly influential arcade game Pac-Man.

1992 – After 30 years, 66-year-old Johnny Carson hosts The Tonight Show for the last time.

2011 – An EF5 Tornado strikes Joplin, Missouri killing 161 people, the single deadliest tornado in the United States since modern record keeping began in 1950.

Hope that puts things into perspective for you.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15739 posts, RR: 27
Reply 10, posted (1 year 4 months 14 hours ago) and read 1595 times:

Quoting kiwirob (Reply 9):
I can't see why you need perspective on such an event.

   Go celebrate your birthday and forget about the rest. It's not connected.

Quoting kiwirob (Reply 9):
1964 – U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announces the goals of his Great Society social reforms to bring an "end to poverty and racial injustice" in America.

Now that's the real disaster of the day.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2667 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (1 year 4 months 13 hours ago) and read 1570 times:

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
A mountain blew up, 50+ people died. Four days later is my birthday. Every year, on this day, my mind is still reeling. Someone help me put this in perspective.

My birthday is September 20th.

The one in 2001 was a little overshadowed by then-recent events.

I don't remember if I did anything on that birthday; maybe went to Rubio's (but I go to Rubio's every day I'm in San Diego anyway  ).

The next year was a big birthday for me, and I took a big ol' trip to a place I always wanted to see, Halifax, Nova Scotia. I flew into Montréal, spent the night, then took the train - Canadian Pacific's old Ocean Limited route up to yonder Halifax. I had a great time, and a great trip. My soul even surived the Halifax Explosion exhibit at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. The Halifax Explosion was kind of that city's own 9/11; in 1917 a munitions ship caught fire in the harbor and the resulting explosion is still, IIRC, the largest non-nuclear man-made explosion in history. It was a very, very sad exhibit and of course I had just a week earlier watched the 9/11 anniversary coverage on American television. (With that being so, I skipped the major Titanic exhibit at that museum; maybe next time.)

So yes, awful things happen sometimes too close to sposedta-be-happy days. The happy days get compromised by that; that doesn't mean you have to let them be ruined.



Pancakes are delicious.
User currently offlineTSS From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 3068 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (1 year 4 months 10 hours ago) and read 1537 times:

Eh, my birthday is known in the US as "A date which will live in infamy", and every year on my birthday I get to hear a recording of Franklin Delano Roosevelt saying that phrase at least once. I've learned to live with it.


Able to kill active threads stone dead with a single post!
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6203 posts, RR: 30
Reply 13, posted (1 year 4 months 9 hours ago) and read 1522 times:
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Quoting Airstud (Reply 11):
The one in 2001 was a little overshadowed by then-recent events.

Mine is September the 12th. How do you think I fared that year with the cake?



MGGS
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39875 posts, RR: 74
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 months 5 hours ago) and read 1487 times:

Quoting GuitrThree (Reply 7):
My birthday too! I, however, was 12.

Happy Birthday Fly!

Thanks for the birthday wishes.
Me & you have the same birthday?!?!?!  Wow!

Happy birthday to you as well!



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2523 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (1 year 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1423 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 6):
Quoting seb146 (Reply 3):
Like with Mt. Hood and Mt. Shasta. All the Cascades are volcanos.

Isn't Mt. Rainier the one with the most likelihood to blow next? Not like it's imminent or anything, but it's still considered as an active volcano.

It isn't necessarily the one that will blow next but it is the one that most concerns authorities for two reasons. First, because of all the glaciers on its flanks, there is a potential for catastrophic lahars in the event of an eruption. Secondly, its proximity to large human populations in the Tacoma area pose a great risk for several hundred thousand people should it blow. Mt. Baker and Mt Hood have shown more activity in the past several decades but don't pose nearly as much risk to large population centers as Rainier. If Shasta were to go, it would make I-5 unusable for a period of time which would definitely disrupt commerce between CA and OR/WA. There's really no other good north/south route along the west coast.
And the towns of Weed, Dunsmuir and Mt Shasta City would almost certainly have to be evacuated.


User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 16, posted (1 year 3 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 1297 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 6):
Isn't Mt. Rainier the one with the most likelihood to blow next? Not like it's imminent or anything, but it's still considered as an active volcano.

Within recent years Mt Baker has been known to vent some steam, likely indicating lava is getting closer to the surface. Which would be really bad because:
- great ski area
- spill zone for melt/pyrochlastic flow would most likely be north across the border into Linden area BC. Many fatalities.
- Baker is the handsomest mountain I've ever seen, nice peak, big broad shoulders. Eruption would destroy that, most likely.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 31
Reply 17, posted (1 year 3 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 1264 times:

Like many people, I saw some news coverage of the eruption.

My most indepth reports were a special National Geographic edition which I still have.

However, in December 1982 I took a flight from SFO to SEA - and the weather was completely clear.

Flying just a few miles west of the mountain - we had a perfect view of the remains of the mountain, and most of the forest destruction was still very visible. It was a profoundly somber experience to see the mountain and realize exactly how powerful the explosion was, and the devastation that would have occured had the south side of the mountain given way.

I've been upclose and personal to see the results of war, tornados (Xenia Ohio), earthquakes, floods, plane crashes, Cat 5 hurricanes (Camile, Katrina). But the Mt St Helens flyover was just as impressive and stunning.


User currently onlineStarAC17 From Canada, joined Aug 2003, 3375 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1150 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 6):
Isn't Mt. Rainier the one with the most likelihood to blow next? Not like it's imminent or anything, but it's still considered as an active volcano.

The best scientific answer is "Who knows"
For all the volcanoes in that area they could erupt in 6 months or 1000-10,000 years. Hopefully with all the technology the USGS has they will know if a volcano like Rainer is waking up and evacuate accordingly. However they can't predict the scale of the eruption or exactly when it's going to happen.

In terms of Geological terms Mt. St Helens could have a high chance repeat of 1980 because it has erupted several times since then but 33 years is minuscule in terms the life of the volcano. Volcanolgists could probably make the case that the 1980 large eruption and every minor one since then is considered the same event.



Engineers Rule The World!!!!!
User currently offlineredflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 19, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1109 times:

I wonder where Harry Truman is buried and if his remains will ever be found some day?


My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2523 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1094 times:

Quoting redflyer (Reply 19):
I wonder where Harry Truman is buried and if his remains will ever be found some day?

not likely - He and his lodge are under about 300 feet of rock, mud, pumice and ash.


User currently onlineStarAC17 From Canada, joined Aug 2003, 3375 posts, RR: 9
Reply 21, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1060 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 17):
But the Mt St Helens flyover was just as impressive and stunning.

My aunt wrote a piece about it when she was studying in Seattle and visited the eruption zone and said that you are in a dense forest and then nothing and this was about 5-10 years ago. Did the land look to be coming back?? I know it will because the material ejected from volcanoes create some of the most fertile land in the world.

Volcanoes have always been fascinating to me and when you look at the scale of some of them its impressive. I have swam in one supervolcano (Lake Taupo, NZ) and am very impressed that that is a Caldera. I would love to see Krakatoa and see the footprint of the 1883 eruption even though it is underwater and visit Yellowstone.



Engineers Rule The World!!!!!
User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 970 times:

Quoting ouboy79 (Reply 1):
The flip side we also get to see the Earth rebuild itself as Mt St Helens has shown with the relatively new lava domes

Mt. St. Helens (pre-5/18/80) was built by a series of eruptions. Given this history, Mt. St. Helens will likely once again look like it used to. In our lifetimes? Possibly, but very unlikely.

Quoting seb146 (Thread starter):
50+ people died

57 to be exact. Including Harry Truman

Quoting ER757 (Reply 15):
First, because of all the glaciers on its flanks, there is a potential for catastrophic lahars in the event of an eruption. Secondly, its proximity to large human populations in the Tacoma area pose a great risk for several hundred thousand people should it blow.

Mt. Rainier is considerably older than Mt. St. Helens, and the rock underneath it is closer to a clay consistency. The west flank is weaker than the east, and even without an MSH-style eruption, if that flank collapsed, it would be disastrous, to say the least. The Kent/Auburn area, including Renton and Tukwila, are all built on ancient lahars from Mt. Rainier. If it happened once...

Quoting ER757 (Reply 20):
Quoting redflyer (Reply 19):
I wonder where Harry Truman is buried and if his remains will ever be found some day?

not likely - He and his lodge are under about 300 feet of rock, mud, pumice and ash.

Impossible. Truman and his lodge were at the base of MSH, and at the south end of the old Spirit Lake. They would have both been completely obliterated by the rock landslide at 8:32am. And yes...under about 300 feet of rock, mud, etc. Truman refused to leave, and if I were him, I wouldn't either. He went the way he wanted to, bless him!

Quoting StarAC17 (Reply 21):
Did the land look to be coming back??

Very definitely, but with different vegetation. I've done numerous hikes in that area over the years. "Harry's Ridge" gives you a great view right into the crater! You can also hike across the pumice plain as well in front of the mountain. At the northeast corner of the new Spirit Lake (half the depth of the old one, and twice the surface area), you can hike down to the water's edge, and on a clear day, get some great pictures of MSH.


User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2523 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (1 year 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 906 times:

Quoting N174UA (Reply 22):
The Kent/Auburn area, including Renton and Tukwila, are all built on ancient lahars from Mt. Rainier. If it happened once...

Parts of Tacoma and Puyallup as well - those are from the Oceola mudflow about 6600 years ago IIRC. Not very long in geologic time.
I'm in the Kent Valley and have a good view of the mountain - if I see it go, I'll be running up West Hill like Usain Bolt!!  


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