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Checkout Etiquette: Yes Or No To Mobile Phones?  
User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2554 times:

Interesting incident at a London Sainsbury's:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...e-mobile.html?ICO=most_read_module

Since when do staff dictate policy? I don't see the checkout assistant's problem here: the woman was making a call and not hindering her in any way. Yet when I checked the poll, 84 per cent say that the assistant was right not to serve her.

Your thoughts?

81 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinedesertjets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7802 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2544 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Since when do staff dictate policy? I don't see the checkout assistant's problem here: the woman was making a call and not hindering her in any way. Yet when I checked the poll, 84 per cent say that the assistant was right not to serve her.

Your thoughts?

It's rude. If you are interacting with a person who is right in front of you.... even if it is checking out at a grocery store, you should put your call on hold. Same thing for bank tellers, fast food counters, wait staff at restaurants, etc.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8917 posts, RR: 24
Reply 2, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2533 times:

Quoting desertjets (Reply 1):
It's rude. If you are interacting with a person who is right in front of you.... even if it is checking out at a grocery store, you should put your call on hold. Same thing for bank tellers, fast food counters, wait staff at restaurants, etc.

Absolutely. Ditto for people who walk around with those stupid headphones and won't take them off when talking/interacting with you.

Their mamas didn't bring them up right...



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinencfc99 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2512 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
I don't see the checkout assistant's problem here: the woman was making a call and not hindering her in any way.

Neither do I, just get on with the job you are paid to do. High maintenence checkout staff. If i'm having a conversation with my wife when we are shopping is that considered rude aswell.

[Edited 2013-07-03 12:29:02]

User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2591 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2464 times:

Quoting ncfc99 (Reply 3):
Neither do I, just get on with the job you are paid to do. High maintenence checkout staff. If i'm having a conversation with my wife when we are shopping is that considered rude aswell.

Guess I'm just old school - can't understand why people need to be on their phones talking, texting, tweeting 24x7x365. That call to your wife can't wait three minutes while you're checking out at the store? What if the cashier wants to question something about your purchase? Should everyone behind you just wait there patiently while you finish up?
Sorry - I agree with the others who say it's rude. Yeah, I know, I'm probably going to be out on my porch screaming "get off my lawn" to the neighborhood kids soon.   


User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27245 posts, RR: 60
Reply 5, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2450 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Your thoughts?

To be on the phone at the check out is very rude and its more worrying that people don't think its rude. As for the check out assistant its not their job to decide so they were both in the wrong IMHO. When you are interacting with someone you afford them the respect by giving them your full attention. I think people forget their manners sometimes and think just because the person is working at a check out they don't deserve being interacted with.

If it is an emergency phone call thats different. You say to the check out staff member or whoever it is ''Im really sorry I need to take this call its urgent''. When I say emergency it doesnt mean chatting to a mate about a football game but a real emergency. If its not then tell the person you will call back. The check out takes around 5-7 mins at max so it doesnt kill people to set this time aside to be nice and show respect. If tables were turned it would be another story Im sure.!


User currently offlinencfc99 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2432 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 4):
Guess I'm just old school - can't understand why people need to be on their phones talking, texting, tweeting 24x7x365.

I'm with you on the 24x7x365 thing, sometimes its too much. But on the flip side, is it such an issue. Why is it ok for the employee to decide that that call can wait and she needs the customers full atention to scan a few items, its taking it too the other extreme. A happy medium is what is called for. From the article, the customer comes across as reasonable, not doing anything overtly outrageous, certainly not enough to warrant a 'telling off' by the store emplyee. Again, just do your job and let me be on my way.

Quoting ER757 (Reply 4):
That call to your wife can't wait three minutes while you're checking out at the store?

I actually meant if she was in the shop with me. I'm talking to my wife, paying no attention to the checkout worker, are they going to stop and ask us to be quiet whilst they scan, I think not. Again it isn't up to the checkout worker to decide if that call is justified, its still a conversation between two people weather both are in the shop or only one person on a phone. There could be many reason to make a call at that time. Maybe it could wait, but is it really such an issue for the emplyee(obviously it was). If I behaved like this at work towards a customer, my boss would hang me from the yard arm.

Quoting ER757 (Reply 4):
What if the cashier wants to question something about your purchase?

Then the cashier can polietly say' excuse me sir/madam, bla bla bla'. My boss at work drills into us to 'treat the customer like gold', there are ways to talk to customers in awkward situations whilst reaming polite and professional.

Quoting ER757 (Reply 4):
Should everyone behind you just wait there patiently while you finish up?

The customer was waiting to bag her shopping with no-one in the que behind her, it may have slowed her down a bit but inconvenience no-one, except the cashier, who is getting paid anyway.

So yes there may be times when using a phone can be rude, reading the article, I can't see that this was one of them.


User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2432 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 4):
Guess I'm just old school - can't understand why people need to be on their phones talking, texting, tweeting 24x7x365. That call to your wife can't wait three minutes while you're checking out at the store? What if the cashier wants to question something about your purchase? Should everyone behind you just wait there patiently while you finish up?
Sorry - I agree with the others who say it's rude. Yeah, I know, I'm probably going to be out on my porch screaming "get off my lawn" to the neighborhood kids soon.

You can't be that old school if you don't prescribe to the old adage "the customer is always right". Sure, the customer was being rude, but the cashier isn't the etiquette police. A rude customer is still a paying customer. If I were the manager, I'd seriously consider firing this employee.

Quoting OA260 (Reply 5):
As for the check out assistant its not their job to decide so they were both in the wrong IMHO.

This! It is incredibly rude to continue to chat on the phone while interacting with someone else, BUT the cashier is in no position to refuse service based on those grounds.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinesbworcs From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2005, 851 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2423 times:

I used to work for another large supermarket chain in the UK and we had a sign behind the counter that we would not serve customers until they had finished their mobile phone conversation, Common courtesy in my book.


The best way forwards is upwards!
User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 9, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2423 times:

Maybe I'm still missing something here: I don't even see the woman using her phone as being rude. I go to the supermarket, do my shopping, go to the checkout and put my purchases on the belt. If the checkout assistant wants to start a conversation I'll chat, otherwise I'll just say "Hi" and let them get on with their job. Most don't want to converse anyway, and certainly not beyond the usual pleasantries.

I think the problem here is "customer service". Most businesses want to attract and retain customers, and never was it more important than in the current economic climate. So, unless the customer is actually interfering with the assistant's ability to do the job, it's not the assistant's role to tell the customer what -- or what not -- to do. As I see it, the ASSISTANT is the one who is being rude here -- she didn't even attempt to be polite when addressing the woman -- and should be disciplined.

As a result of her behaviour, the customer is now switching to Waitrose. If I was the store manager, I'd be furious, AND offering the woman a grovelling apology, as well as a substantial voucher.


User currently offlinencfc99 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2419 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 7):
It is incredibly rude to continue to chat on the phone while interacting with someone else, BUT the cashier is in no position to refuse service based on those grounds.

Ok, there seems to be alot of people that consider a supermarket checkout interaction more interactive than I. When I go to the checkout it usually goes like this

Cashier :- "Good morning, do you have your own bags/would you like me to pack for you?(or some other question they have to ask)
Me :- Hi, no I do not (I never remember my old bags or ask them to pack)

Beep
Bag
Beep
Bag
and so on until

Cashier :- Thats £100 please (I pay)
Me :- Thankyou, goodbye
Cashier :- Goodbye

The interaction is very limited and I wouldn't have a problem continuing my phone conversation with a pause for the first bit and last bit of interaction. I can't see how a phone conversation is rude during the majority of this interaction if no other customers are being inconveinienced by my slightly slower packing speeds.


User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2794 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2403 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 7):
It is incredibly rude to continue to chat on the phone while interacting with someone else, BUT the cashier is in no position to refuse service based on those grounds.

This sums up how I feel about the situation. Both were in the wrong.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27245 posts, RR: 60
Reply 12, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2402 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 9):
If the checkout assistant wants to start a conversation I'll chat, otherwise I'll just say "Hi" and let them get on with their job. Most don't want to converse anyway, and certainly not beyond the usual pleasantries.

I shop at M&S and Sainsburys on a regular basis. I have to say in fairness I find Sainsburys better than M&S check out staff. Sainsburys staff are quite chatty and more so in Northern Irish stores than English stores. Just a perception but its a cultural thing too. I treat people the way I wish to be treated and it creates a nicer enviroment. I do find it rude to be on the phone at check out or whilst buying a ticket at the train station for instance. This has become more of an issue with the boom in mobile phone usage where people have lost their senses on where and when its appropriate to use them. Ive heard them going off in funerals in recent times and they still dont think its something to be ashamed of.

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 9):
As a result of her behaviour, the customer is now switching to Waitrose. If I was the store manager, I'd be furious, AND offering the woman a grovelling apology, as well as a substantial voucher.

I agree there and purely because it was not the staff members job to make that ruling. They are paid to do a job and they should get on with it. The fact that the person they were serving didnt have the manners to end her call whilst being served is not a reason to refuse service.


User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2391 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

I will not enter the checkout line if I am talking on the phone. I personally feel it is rude to chat away on your phone while going through the line. Not to mention it takes longer to unload your cart. Maybe I just over think it, but I feel that the check out workers receive enough crap throughout the day. I can be polite for a couple of minutes while they process my order.
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15812 posts, RR: 27
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2353 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Your thoughts?

Not rude. It would be rude if the person on the phone were slowing down the line, but I'm not going to drop what I'm doing to have a pointless ten second conversation that I don't need to have when I have something better to do.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2340 times:

I don't think the cell phone will interfere with the electronics of the cash machine 
I have been to stores where the staff have to help you out and they were on the phone and ignore you for 10 minutes, that is what is rude. Customer service now appears to be reversed.
Any demeaning verbal comments or gesture towards a staff by the customer is what I consider rude. In this case the customer didn't have the intent to be rude.


User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 16, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2307 times:

There's another way of looking at this: IF there had been other customers waiting, then the ASSISTANT would be the one holding them up, not the customer. While it is also the assistant's job to bag the purchases (unless there is someone there to do it) most people lend a hand, or even do it themselves (as I usually do), but it is not compulsory.

User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7972 posts, RR: 51
Reply 17, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2305 times:

I usually put the phone in my pocket, but sometimes I'll be on it. I make sure I don't delay the cashier or the people behind me. If that is rude, eh, we all have our opinions, I don't think it is.

Then again, I go through self checkouts 95% of the time. I try my best to be nice to workers, but I also believe in the notion that the customer is (almost) always right. You're gonna deal with some jerk customers, that is in the job description



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineDNDTUF From France, joined Feb 2012, 29 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2302 times:

I used to work at Sainsbury's when I was a student as a checkout operator and this was one of the things that would really annoy me. I was brought up to believe that it is rude to interrupt someone, so when a customer came to my till on their phone I would wait until they had finished their call until I took their transaction. It was not about being uppity but there is nothing more ignorant than talking on the phone when you are face to face with someone else - you wouldn't answer the phone when you are ordering in a restaurant, would you? Of course most people would apologise and gesture that they were sorry for being so rude and in that case, I would oblige, it's just a question of being polite. I would get reprimanded if I decided to turn around and talk to a colleague in the middle of a transaction!

I like the fact that in France, the customer is not always right. I have seen people being sent to the back of the queue for being on their phone when they are being served, or they would step aside and finish their call. Although (thankfully!!!) I no longer have to work in the service industry, I hate the culture that they are there to serve you and that anything goes - every job serves a purpose so you should treat everyone with respect!

Oh that, and people putting their loyalty cards or banknotes in their mouth before handing it to you... urgh!


User currently offlinebristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2293 times:

A resounding 'no'. I had to take a call yesterday while being served at a bank (my wife had just had a doctor apt) but I felt bad about it and made a point of holding the phone away from my ear to thank the teller. If you can't spend a few mins without the phone to your ear, you have issues. As for blue tooth headsets - boy, do they look stupid.


Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineN776AU From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 768 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2256 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 14):
It would be rude if the person on the phone were slowing down the line

As a former cashier at a grocery store, that's my biggest issue. You may as well build a wall between you and them. They always are yacking and then digging around their purse/wallet distracted, and thus unable to locate a credit card/cash. Pain for me and everyone else too.

Because of that I always hang up in such a situation, which admittedly is rare. I never have figured out what's so damn important that you have to be on the phone 24/7.



Careful, Doors Are Closing And Will Not Reopen. Please Wait For The Next Train
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 21, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2252 times:

It's bad form to talk on the phone during such interactions, but at the same time it's not such an outrageous affront that the cashier should then be dictating that the person hang up. The supermarket sector here in the UK is highly competitive, and it's not acceptable for an employee to risk losing custom by imposing their personal views on shoppers. If there's no policy on it, no signage and so on, then it's not her place to start up about it. Like I say though, I personally don't find it acceptable.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 22, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2234 times:

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 17):
Then again, I go through self checkouts 95% of the time.

Same here. So much more convenient.

Quoting DeltaMD90 (Reply 17):
but I also believe in the notion that the customer is (almost) always right.

I guess you haven't worked your way through school as a server, eh?  
Quoting DNDTUF (Reply 18):
I used to work at Sainsbury's when I was a student as a checkout operator and this was one of the things that would really annoy me. I was brought up to believe that it is rude to interrupt someone, so when a customer came to my till on their phone I would wait until they had finished their call until I took their transaction. It was not about being uppity but there is nothing more ignorant than talking on the phone when you are face to face with someone else - you wouldn't answer the phone when you are ordering in a restaurant, would you? Of course most people would apologise and gesture that they were sorry for being so rude and in that case, I would oblige, it's just a question of being polite. I would get reprimanded if I decided to turn around and talk to a colleague in the middle of a transaction!

Remind me...is it you or the customer that is paid to serve the other?

Quoting bristolflyer (Reply 19):
As for blue tooth headsets - boy, do they look stupid.

I don't like them either, but where I live it's illegal to use handheld devices when driving, so it's the only real option for taking calls while driving (without installing one of those expensive speaker systems in your vehicle).

Quoting bristolflyer (Reply 19):
If you can't spend a few mins without the phone to your ear, you have issues.

...or you run a business.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 21):
It's bad form to talk on the phone during such interactions, but at the same time it's not such an outrageous affront that the cashier should then be dictating that the person hang up. The supermarket sector here in the UK is highly competitive, and it's not acceptable for an employee to risk losing custom by imposing their personal views on shoppers. If there's no policy on it, no signage and so on, then it's not her place to start up about it.

Very well said, RussianJet.



Flying refined.
User currently offlineken777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8431 posts, RR: 9
Reply 23, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2223 times:

Horrid manners - the broad was obviously born in a barn.

Maybe the clerks need an out of sight button they can press - resulting in THEIR phone ringing. Then they can talk gibberish while sloppily scanning the broads basket. Let the customer get concerned about how rude and problematic using a phone glued to an ear can be.

Irritates me more than normal as I twice had a car come close to hitting me today - both little women driving a BIG SUV with a phone to their ear and turning a corner - almost into me.

Me? I spent enough years in retailing to know it's intelligent to be focused & polite to the staff. I'll even ask if their company offers discounts to Veterans. Lots, including Lowe's and Home Depot give 10% discounts o more - just show a Military ID or V card. It can pay to show good manners when checking out.  


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 24, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2215 times:

Quoting ken777 (Reply 23):
Irritates me more than normal as I twice had a car come close to hitting me today - both little women driving a BIG SUV with a phone to their ear and turning a corner - almost into me.

That's a slightly different kettle of fish really. Don't know about your local laws, but using a mobile without a hands-free kit is most certainly illegal in the UK. Using a mobile at the checkout isn't, and neither is it in any way dangerous. It's just rather rude, that's all.

Quoting ken777 (Reply 23):
Then they can talk gibberish while sloppily scanning the broads basket. Let the customer get concerned about how rude and problematic using a phone glued to an ear can be.

If I was their boss I'd sack them on the spot for doing that. I know you're joking, but still....



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 25, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2253 times:

Quoting ken777 (Reply 23):
the broad

Speaking of poor manners...

Quoting ken777 (Reply 23):
Maybe the clerks need an out of sight button they can press - resulting in THEIR phone ringing. Then they can talk gibberish while sloppily scanning the broads basket.

I'll ask you the same question I asked another poster: Is it the cashier or the customer that is paid to serve the other?



Flying refined.
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 4
Reply 26, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2245 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 25):
I'll ask you the same question I asked another poster: Is it the cashier or the customer that is paid to serve the other?

I know this quote wasn't directed at me, but I feel like it shouldn't matter. Yes the cashier is providing a service and is being paid for it. But it doesn't automatically mean you can be rude. Always be respectful no matter what is what I believe in.
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 27, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2250 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 26):
Yes the cashier is providing a service and is being paid for it. But it doesn't automatically mean you can be rude. Always be respectful no matter what is what I believe in.

Again, if you're being paid to be the etiquette police, then fine. But the thing is, you are paid to scan items, maybe bag them, and to accept coupons/cash in exchange for said items, and nothing more. Refusing service because of what you perceive to be rude is outside the scope of your job as a cashier.

I'll reiterate that I do find it rude to have a phone conversation during a transaction with someone you're standing in front of. But the cashier doesn't get to decide what is and isn't rude, and that they get to refuse service based on grounds that aren't directly affecting their job or the safety of other customers.

I've worked in customer service before, as a server in a restaurant to be more specific, and I can tell you I've had hundreds of customers be rude to me in various ways for no apparent reason. I can assure you I shut my mouth every single time and went upon my duties as a server, because it was in no way my place to lecture the person paying my wage on how to conduct themselves.

Now if I'm there as another customer and someone is being overtly rude, then it's another story...



Flying refined.
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 28, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2250 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 26):
But it doesn't automatically mean you can be rude. Always be respectful no matter what is what I believe in.

Indeed not. However, this is more of an etiquette matter than one of overt, severe rudeness. There are of course limits to what such employees should tolerate, but it's not like the woman was hurling foul language at her or something. Whether we like it or not, mobile phones are a huge part of modern life. When you work in somewhere like a supermarket, you're going to come across an awful lot of people whose behaviour you disagree with, but are required to tolerate in the interests of the business, This is precisely one such example. It's not illegal to neglect to thank the person that serves you either, and you might not like it, but that will also happen sometimes when you deal with large volumes of customers every day.

If you're going to get uppity every time you encounter any such perceived rudeness, you're probably not best suited to the service industry. It's always a pity to encounter people lacking in manners, but they're out there en masse and tolerating a portion of it is part and parcel of serving the public for a living. Of course in an ideal world it would all be daisies and rainbows, but in reality it's just not like that. I worked in supermarkets in my younger days and it was my job to be helpful and polite in all circumstances, and could only hope that my attitude would be responded to in kind. No matter how hard you try though, there is always a small proportion who for whatever reason will not, and that's just something you have to live with.

Some people are having a terrible day, some are high or drunk, others are just bastards, some might even be ill. That's just the way it is. You never know what's going on in someone's life beyond the short interaction you have with the customer in a shop, and it's not your place to dictate morals to people as a cashier. Doesn't make their behaviour right necessarily, but it's the reality of the situation.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 4
Reply 29, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2241 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 27):
Again, if you're being paid to be the etiquette police, then fine. But the thing is, you are paid to scan items, maybe bag them, and to accept coupons/cash in exchange for said items, and nothing more. Refusing service because of what you perceive to be rude is outside the scope of your job as a cashier.

I'm not speaking necessarily from the cashier's point of view, but rather my own personal. I think what she did was wrong, and there is no place for it. But I as a customer always make sure I am off my phone before I get in line.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 28):
Indeed not. However, this is more of an etiquette matter than one of overt, severe rudeness

That is for sure a better way to put it.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 28):
I worked in supermarkets in my younger days and it was my job to be helpful and polite in all circumstances, and could only hope that my attitude would be responded to in kind. No matter how hard you try though, there is always a small proportion who for whatever reason will not, and that's just something you have to live with.

I completely understand this. I work at UPS. The only interaction I have with customers is when I have to call them to correct their address. Some people are thankful and nice. Others lose their minds because the shipper put the wrong address on there. Hey not my fault. I'm just trying to help! Can't win!
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 30, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2228 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 29):
I'm not speaking necessarily from the cashier's point of view, but rather my own personal. I think what she did was wrong, and there is no place for it. But I as a customer always make sure I am off my phone before I get in line.

Well obviously! I was speaking to those here who think the cashier was in the right for creating her own store policy. Could you imagine if you were at your job at UPS and you told a rude customer that you wouldn't correct their shipment until they said "please"?

I also try to always be as polite as possible to those serving me ("you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" as it were) but there would be hell to pay if a cashier or customer service rep ever refused me service because they took exception to whatever shortcomings I may have.

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 29):
I'm just trying to help!

Too often there are people who have already decided they hate you before you even try to help them. It goes for just about any customer-facing job I think.



Flying refined.
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20784 posts, RR: 62
Reply 31, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2224 times:

From the article:

Quote:
She said: ‘I was standing at the foot of the till waiting to bag my shopping up, yet the lady on the checkout was just staring at me.

‘When I stopped my conversation and said “Is everything okay?” she said: “I will not check your shopping out until you get off your mobile phone”.

Miss Clarke added: ‘There was no one behind me in the queue, it was quite quiet and I just phoned my brother to quickly tell him I was about to leave. He was waiting, so I just gave him a quick call. I couldn’t believe how rude she was.’

So the customer made a quick call to tell her waiting brother that she was on her way while the cashier was scanning/ringing up her items.

But the cashier wouldn't hit the total button until the customer hung up from her call, presumably so that the customer would be phone-free while paying for her items.

Both of them could have handled it better. The customer presumed that the cashier wouldn't mind her not giving the transaction her full attention since there was no one else in line, and talking on the phone wasn't holding anyone else up.

The cashier was a bit snooty for not hitting the total button and just blowing off the customer's rudeness. I don't believe it's the place of the cashier to teach her customers manners unless the customer was causing a disturbance or holding up the line for others.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15812 posts, RR: 27
Reply 32, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2210 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 27):
But the thing is, you are paid to scan items, maybe bag them, and to accept coupons/cash in exchange for said items, and nothing more.

Exactly. Do your job. I know they don't care how my day was, and I don't care that they don't care. Just take care of business.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 3051 posts, RR: 52
Reply 33, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2198 times:
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Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 30):
I also try to always be as polite as possible to those serving me ("you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" as it were) but there would be hell to pay if a cashier or customer service rep ever refused me service because they took exception to whatever shortcomings I may have.

Hypothetically, what if the customer is being abusive or intimidating? What if they're being racist?

Not talking about you specifically. However, I believe that everyone, including customer service folks have the right to remove themselves from a situation where they are the target of aggression, even if it means refusing to serve them. The person behind the counter is also a human being and never agreed to give up their dignity when they signed up for the job.



The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2821 posts, RR: 4
Reply 34, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2171 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 30):
Could you imagine if you were at your job at UPS and you told a rude customer that you wouldn't correct their shipment until they said "please"?

I can picture it now "Mrs Smith, if you do not say 'Pat can you please correct my address' I will return your hand crafted tea pot to Long Beach!" (Just to be clear I would never do that! It's evil!!!)

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 31):
The cashier was a bit snooty for not hitting the total button and just blowing off the customer's rudeness. I don't believe it's the place of the cashier to teach her customers manners unless the customer was causing a disturbance or holding up the line for others.

Absolutely agree, the cashier was on a high horse at that moment. It's one thing if she was jabbering away and taking her dear sweet time with 25 people behind her. But if the checkout line was empty there is no reason for it.
Pat



All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
User currently offlinebongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3658 posts, RR: 3
Reply 35, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2086 times:

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 33):
The person behind the counter is also a human being and never agreed to give up their dignity when they signed up for the job.

  

There appears to be an attitude that a shop worker is of such a low status compared to the valued customer, that they have to accept the situation in front of them. Everyone deserves to be shown a degree of respect.

In my experience people who say "I don't need to be told" are precisely the ones who do.

Politeness and courtesy is a two way process, none of us expect to be served by a checkout operator who is more content in holding a conversation with a fellow member of staff, or even chatting to their family on their phone. (happened to me at an ice cream cart as Downtown Disney, served by lady busy holding a conversation with her daughter).

I'm sure in this instance if the checkout lady had been on her phone whilst serving, the customer would have been deeply offended as she appears to be one to take offence easily and would have made a complaint, yet its ok for her to be holding what by her own admission was an unimportant conversation.

If there had been an error in the transaction which initially went unnoticed due to the customer beign distracted, whose fault would that have been ?

Gordon Ramsay had the right idea when he used to confiscate mobile phones in his resutaurant and return them deep fried.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 36, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2051 times:

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 35):
I'm sure in this instance if the checkout lady had been on her phone whilst serving, the customer would have been deeply offended as she appears to be one to take offence easily and would have made a complaint, yet its ok for her to be holding what by her own admission was an unimportant conversation.

I have no doubt that it would be against company policy for the employee to be on the phone at the checkout, whereas the customer is PAYING for the service and is free to do what they like, regardless of whether we think it's rude to talk on the phone at that particular point (which I do). Poor comparison I'm afraid. The two things are not the same at all.

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 35):
Politeness and courtesy is a two way process

Ideally yes. However, there are currently no rules or laws against failing to show manners in a supermarket, whereas the employees are required to be polite and courteous as they are being paid to do so.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 894 posts, RR: 0
Reply 37, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2033 times:

You generallly need two hands to either pack your bags or get your purse / walet out, so having one of them glued to your ear IS going to slow things down, so finish your conversation as you approach the checkout, or if it rings, how about doing the utterly novel thing of ignoring it? You'll be done in 5 minutes, and then you can carry one your conversation. That way you show courtesy to the cashier, and to your fellow shoppers.

However, I live in Portugal and customer service is still somewhat, err, different. It's very common for example for shop assistants to be on their phones and make me, the customer, stand there whilst they finish their conversation. Another favorite here is one checkout open and 20 people waiting.....



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13170 posts, RR: 15
Reply 38, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2034 times:

Remember the golden rule of retail - the customer is always right even if they are wrong.

Beyond the use of cell phones, there are a lot of other issues that drive me or the clerks crazy in the supermarket check out line. People trying to improperly use coupons or the 'coupon queens' who present a handful of coupons that need to be processed. Those with WIC/SNAP and the need to do certain procedures, including getting the ok from the supervisor to process the sale. People who argue that they can buy 12 of an item at a big discount when the limit is like 4. Those that don't have enough money on them or buy an item they realize that can't afford it or chose the wrong size/version of an item of a like one on sale and it has to be processed. When an item isn't in the system or the bar code if wrong.

To me mobile/cell phone use has caused a new range of rudeness in public. From people dropping the F-word and worse, shouting/screaming into their phones in anger, talking loudly about very private, offensive or eye-rolling issues, using them while driving or even walking down the street causing accidents.


User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 39, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2002 times:

Quoting cgnnrw (Reply 32):
That old line of "I'll never shop in that store again....." I'm willing to bet she'll be back in no time, especially to cash in on those vouchers.

How could you be so sure? The grocery store market is one of the most competitive. This customer has many other options.

Quoting cgnnrw (Reply 32):
I would have done the same thing and if you were my manager and "disciplined" me I'd show you a bit of rudeness by flipping you off and if if meant looking for another job so be it.

You must have serious unresolved anger issues if that would be your response...

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 32):
I know they don't care how my day was, and I don't care that they don't care.

Exactly...although I was called something along the lines of a "disgusting person" for suggesting as such in another thread a few weeks ago. I'll never understand why people think all the people serving them actually care about their day  
Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 33):
Hypothetically, what if the customer is being abusive or intimidating? What if they're being racist?

I did touch on that a bit in reply 27. To elaborate, the only time a cashier should reserve the right to refuse service is if a customer is conducting themselves in a way that is hindering the cashier from doing their job, or if the customer is acting in a threatening manner (which would include intimidation and racism).

I'm not saying that cashiers should have no recourse, because there are definitely limits to what they should have to deal with...but this case is not one such scenario where the cashier had the right to refuse service.

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 35):
I'm sure in this instance if the checkout lady had been on her phone whilst serving, the customer would have been deeply offended as she appears to be one to take offence easily and would have made a complaint, yet its ok for her to be holding what by her own admission was an unimportant conversation.

Absolutely. The PAID employee should be doing what she is PAID to do. For the nth time: her refusal of service was outside the scope of her duties. The customer, although rude, has a certain expectation of service, and in this particular case it was not met, and she rightfully complained.

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 35):
If there had been an error in the transaction which initially went unnoticed due to the customer beign distracted, whose fault would that have been ?

The cashier.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 40, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1982 times:

Oh about 10 years ago I was in a grocery store and the woman ahead of me in line was on the phone. When the cashier started to check out her goods the woman continued talking on the phone. Finally the checker said "That'll be $60.34, ma'm" The woman kept talking on the phone. The cashier repeated herself, the woman just kept talking on the phone. After about 5 minutes of this the woman on the phone screamed at the cashier "Can't you see I am on the phone? Don't bother me when I am on the phone!".

What were we supposed to do, wait until she finishes her phone conversation before we get our turn to check out?

Her actions were beyond rude. I almost said "Move your ass, lady!". But my senses got the better of me. But I suspect the woman with the cell phone was a new user of those things and simply didn't know any better.

My verdict? Tell the person on the phone you are going to check out now and you'll call them back when you have finished.

[Edited 2013-07-04 11:24:56]

User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9202 posts, RR: 11
Reply 41, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1921 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 40):
Her actions were beyond rude. I almost said "Move your ass, lady!". But my senses got the better of me. But I suspect the woman with the cell phone was a new user of those things and simply didn't know any better.

Ignorance is bliss as they say, I would have told her to get her or his ass moving.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 42, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1911 times:

I have a simple set of rules for my cell phone.

When I am in a meeting, in the theater, dining out or in a check out line, I turn it off. There is nothing that could be so important that it couldn't wait until I am available again. When interacting with others in person you need to be there mentally at all times, not carrying on a conversation with others on the phone.

Another thing that drive me more nuts that going out with a number of people to have dinner and one or more of them are continuously on the phone chatting with others. It's another beyond rude situation.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15812 posts, RR: 27
Reply 43, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 39):
Exactly...although I was called something along the lines of a "disgusting person" for suggesting as such in another thread a few weeks ago. I'll never understand why people think all the people serving them actually care about their day

If they really cared about me they'd not waste time and do what I need them to do. I don't want them to slow down for the sake of making small talk. And if I have someone on the phone, I almost certainly want to talk to them more than I want to talk to the cashier.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineken777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8431 posts, RR: 9
Reply 44, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1882 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 24):
If I was their boss I'd sack them on the spot for doing that

It would probably be the manager who called after the button was pushed.   

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 25):
Is it the cashier or the customer that is paid to serve the other?

The cashier is paid to get the products into the register - customer service is on the floor where people help customers with questions, finding product, etc.

If a customer needs to take a call when working with a customer service employee then the employee should walk away to give the customer privacy and maybe even help other customers while the call was going on.

When the customer is ready to take the merchandise to checkout they should put their phone away, be prepared to answer questions, look for errors on the part of the cashier (which happen), and be prepared to pay for the merchandise in one manner or another. Talking on the phone during check out is not only rude to the cashier but also to those in line behind her who have to wait longer than is necessary.


User currently offlineDNDTUF From France, joined Feb 2012, 29 posts, RR: 0
Reply 45, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1869 times:

I think it's a question of respect, a lot of people see that if people work in the service sector, they have the right to treat them like a slave. I choose a supermarket based on the selection of products and the ambience of the store. When I worked in Sainsbury's I was only paid £6.95 an hour and I definitely didn't see it as though the customers were paying my wage, they chose to shop there, if they didn't like my service, they could freely shop elsewhere. The majority of customers (i.e. those who were on their phone, those who turned up to my till topless in summer, those who insisted I bag their groceries tended to be people who bought the discount products and who generated the least revenue for the company). I like the fact that in France, when you shop in a store, you are seen as a guest in that person's place of work and have to treat them with respect. In a lot of cases, the customer should feel lucky that they are allowed to shop in a certain store !

User currently offlinebohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2738 posts, RR: 0
Reply 46, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1868 times:

I'm glad I don't talk on the phone at the checkout. I would really hate to have the self-service checkout machine turn itself off on me.  

User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 47, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1848 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 40):
Her actions were beyond rude. I almost said "Move your ass, lady!". But my senses got the better of me. But I suspect the woman with the cell phone was a new user of those things and simply didn't know any better.

I wouldn't have been so kind. If she was holding me up, I would have been fairly vocal.

Quoting type-rated (Reply 42):
There is nothing that could be so important that it couldn't wait until I am available again.

A family emergency?

Quoting type-rated (Reply 42):
Another thing that drive me more nuts that going out with a number of people to have dinner and one or more of them are continuously on the phone chatting with others. It's another beyond rude situation.

There's a fun solution to that (as long as everyone agrees): Everyone stacks their phone in the middle of the table where everyone can see them (doesn't matter if they're on or off, but preferably off to avoid disruptions). The first person to check their phone before dinner is finished has to pay the bill of the entire table.

Quoting ken777 (Reply 44):
Talking on the phone during check out is not only rude to the cashier but also to those in line behind her who have to wait longer than is necessary.

In the OP's story, there was nobody in line behind the woman.

But assuming there was, the only way they're being held up is if the woman stops everything she's doing in order to chat. Any competent, able-bodied person should be able to pull out their wallet (one hand required), place it on the counter (one hand required), pull out the cash or card (one hand required), and punch in the PIN if need be (one hand required).

Quoting DNDTUF (Reply 45):
I definitely didn't see it as though the customers were paying my wage

Well I hate to break it to you, but they were. Grocery stores have a single source of revenue, and that's from the people your taking payment from at the check-out line.

Quoting DNDTUF (Reply 45):
In a lot of cases, the customer should feel lucky that they are allowed to shop in a certain store !

That's how about 75% of Ponzi schemes work: "We usually only offer this investment opportunity to high net-worth individuals, but we'll make an exception for you this one time. You're lucky to be able to invest with us!"

The fact of the matter is that the grocery store market is hyper-competitive and the power is in the hands of the buyer. Ask any GM at a grocery store and they'll tell you they're lucky to have the customers...especially given average margins of 1-2% in that industry.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 48, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1797 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 47):
Quoting type-rated (Reply 42):
There is nothing that could be so important that it couldn't wait until I am available again.

A family emergency?

Nope, my family is on the other side of the country from where I live. They can take care of themselves without any intervention from me.

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 47):

Quoting type-rated (Reply 42):
Another thing that drive me more nuts that going out with a number of people to have dinner and one or more of them are continuously on the phone chatting with others. It's another beyond rude situation.

There's a fun solution to that (as long as everyone agrees): Everyone stacks their phone in the middle of the table where everyone can see them (doesn't matter if they're on or off, but preferably off to avoid disruptions). The first person to check their phone before dinner is finished has to pay the bill of the entire table.

Now I REALLY like this idea! Good one.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 49, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 1781 times:

Quoting DNDTUF (Reply 45):
When I worked in Sainsbury's I was only paid £6.95 an hour and I definitely didn't see it as though the customers were paying my wage, they chose to shop there

But they certainly were, whether you like them or not.

Quoting DNDTUF (Reply 45):
if they didn't like my service, they could freely shop elsewhere

And if I, as your boss, saw you behaving in any manner towards customers that encouraged them to go elsewhere, excepting in the most unacceptable levels of provocation, you'd be hauled up on it for losing us custom.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineken777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8431 posts, RR: 9
Reply 50, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1717 times:

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 47):
Well I hate to break it to you, but they were.

Not really - the company was paying their wages. The key to understanding who pays the wages to to consider who hands out the pay checks, who fills in all government forms, calculates withholding and delivers that withholding to the appropriate destinations within the allotted time frame.

That cashier is going to be paid regardless of where the rude, plump broad shops.


User currently offlineRobertNL070 From Netherlands, joined Sep 2003, 4533 posts, RR: 9
Reply 51, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

Quoting bongodog1964 (Reply 35):
There appears to be an attitude that a shop worker is of such a low status compared to the valued customer, that they have to accept the situation in front of them. Everyone deserves to be shown a degree of respect.

As is evident in this thead. But the cashier could have handled it better.

"....and I just phoned my brother to quickly tell him I was about to leave. He was waiting so I just gave him a quick call."

Oh, the inanity of it.

There is a very chic kitchen store where I live. They have signs at the checkout: "for your privacy, we will not assist you while you are making a telephone call." Freely translated from Dutch. It's a very popular store.

[Edited 2013-07-05 12:50:35]


Youth is a gift of nature. Age is a work of art.
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 52, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1693 times:
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Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 31):
So the customer made a quick call to tell her waiting brother that she was on her way while the cashier was scanning/ringing up her items.

"Quick"? Hmmmm. I have chums who'll talk on the phone for half an hour and describe it as a "quick" call.

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 31):
But the cashier wouldn't hit the total button until the customer hung up from her call, presumably so that the customer would be phone-free while paying for her items.

I think that's the key. Nothing to do with service, it was a transaction involving money, with the cashier responsible to the company for it being accurate. If the till is inaccurate at the end of the day, guess who is responsible.

When I am talking money the conversation has my undivided attention, and I have seen customers almost go to war with the cashier over a discount or sale price they thought they were entitled to but the computer didn't give them.

Did the cashier over-react? Sure, but it is fairly understandable. In my younger days, I used to fill-in as a barman sometimes, and certain things would set me off - a customer snapping his fingers for attention was a particular bete noir of mine. So I'd tell 'em - "I'm not your dog, sir, to come at your command."

You might be surprised at how well they would then tip - not always, but often enough to make a difference.  

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 53, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1687 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 48):
Nope, my family is on the other side of the country from where I live. They can take care of themselves without any intervention from me.

Well that's a case-by-case scenario, of which I believe you're the minority. In general, people tend to live within reasonable driving distance of family. That's not even including spouse and children.

But hey, less interruptions for you I guess!

Quoting ken777 (Reply 50):
That cashier is going to be paid regardless of where the rude, plump broad shops.

Well I better throw my fancy business degree in the garbage then, because all this time I thought it was the customers who gave money to the store, who then in turn used that money to pay the employees, and without that money the employees would be without a job.   

Quoting ken777 (Reply 50):
rude, plump broad

Your hypocrisy is rather startling to say the least.

Quoting RobertNL070 (Reply 51):
"for your privacy, we will not assist you while you are making a telephone call."

How diplomatic  



Flying refined.
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 54, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1668 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 52):
it was a transaction involving money, with the cashier responsible to the company for it being accurate

How does the customer talking on the phone affect the cashier scanning the item, do you expect the customer to monitor each item being scanned in real time? If the cashier makes a mistake does it becomes customers fault for not catching it real time?

I do agree the cashier can interrupt the customer on the phone when it is time to pay, nobody has to wait for the phone call to end. The customer needs to hold the call from when he/she gets the receipt till they finish the payment.

It is about common sense not about some silly stuff like she didn't pay attention to me while I was scanning items but instead was talking on the phone, it is more like spousal thing now.

How about you are talking with your boss and he gets a call, do you think it is rude of him to stop the conversation with you and he attends his call without asking the caller to hold?
Who cares, there are somethings with more priority, so just suck it up.

[Edited 2013-07-05 13:08:42]

User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 3051 posts, RR: 52
Reply 55, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1660 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 53):
Well I better throw my fancy business degree in the garbage then, because all this time I thought it was the customers who gave money to the store, who then in turn used that money to pay the employees, and without that money the employees would be without a job.

I guess it varies by store, company or type of business, but I'd say that, from experience, that the vast majority of customers are polite and respectful. You'll find that in most cases, they'll be treated accordingly. They are the true bread and butter of the business, not necessarily the difficult customers that make up a small minority.



The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 56, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1657 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 54):
How does the customer talking on the phone affect the cashier scanning the item, do you expect the customer to monitor each item being scanned in real time? If the cashier makes a mistake does it becomes customers fault for not catching it real time?

As above, I've seen customers do that. As above, I've seen customers go to war over a price the computer (not the cashier) didn't give them, although the cashier cops it.

I've seen 'em demand to have a manager sort it out and eventually decide they don't want the item if they can't get the price they thought they should pay.

I;ve seen customers haggling over what items they should take if they can't afford to pay the whole bill.

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 54):
How about you are talking with your boss and he gets a call, do you think it is rude of him to stop the conversation with you and he attends his call without asking the caller to hold?

I'd be on the boss's time - he's paying me. How he spends his budget is his business.

The other way round, I was one of a panel of three interviewing people for a job last and year and one applicant actually took a call during the i/v.

He didn't get the job.

mariner

[Edited 2013-07-05 13:33:23]


aeternum nauta
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 57, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1640 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 56):
I'd be on the boss's time - he's paying me. How he spends his budget is his business.

Although though not exactly the same, the same idea could apply to this scenario, the customer(s) is/are indirectly paying the Cashier. As long as other customers are not inconvenienced and she not breaking any laws , this issue shouldn't be a big deal. A person who cannot put up with these minor irritants should not be in the customer service field.

[Edited 2013-07-05 13:36:17]

User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 58, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1628 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 57):
A person who cannot put up with these minor irritants should not be in the customer service field.

As above, I don't think it is "customer service" - it a necessary financial transaction and the cashier is responsible for the till.

The shopper can't leave the store with the goodies she wants until she has paid for 'em.

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineRedTailDTW From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 757 posts, RR: 3
Reply 59, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1624 times:

In my 5 years at Target, I have made tons of observations.

I do think that talking or texting on your phone during checkout is rude, mainly because they are slowing down the line 80 percent of the time. This is because the time they need getting their payment ready and putting their bags back in their cart, they are spending talking on the phone. Not many people seem to have the knack of doing multiple things at once efficiently.

If I was a person on the other end of the call I would be mad too because the person your talking to is talking to two people at once (you and the cashier) so they are probably not listening very well. The same goes for the cashier, especially people with Bluetooth headsets. You never know sometimes which person the customer is talking to, you (the cashier) or the person they are talking to on the phone.

When I used to be a cashier, after I say hi and ask how they are, if someone was on their phone and not paying attention or saying hi back or anything, I wouldn't say anything and leave them alone for the rest of the transaction. Cashiers may be required to say hi and conversate, but I know a lot of them are honest and not faking it. So if we extend a greeting to you and give you our courtesy, you should give us yours.


- Mason



Northwest Airlines. Now your flying smart!
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 60, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1617 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 58):
As above, I don't think it is "customer service"
http://work.chron.com/skills-needed-retail-cashier-3187.html
Customer Relations
Cashiers need the skills to provide friendly and helpful customer service. They also need the ability to listen carefully and show patience to customers who are difficult or upset. If the store has discounts for older customers or sells goods restricted by age, cashiers need the skill to verify age without giving offense. Cashiers need to maintain an appearance and grooming that reflects well on the company and gives the customer confidence.


User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5734 posts, RR: 10
Reply 61, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1612 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
Since when do staff dictate policy? I don't see the checkout assistant's problem here: the woman was making a call and not hindering her in any way. Yet when I checked the poll, 84 per cent say that the assistant was right not to serve her.

Your thoughts?

I think it is absolutely rude and anytime I have been on a call in situations like this (including bank tellers or any situation where there is customer service persons doing an action for me) I will either tell the person I am on the phone with that I will call them right back or I take moment and apologize to the service person for the situation. I also then and pay attention to the service person while I am on the call, ready to be available if needed.


Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 2):
Absolutely. Ditto for people who walk around with those stupid headphones and won't take them off when talking/interacting with you.

Their mamas didn't bring them up right...

Bluetooth ear pieces are for when you need your hands free and potentially greater focus on what you are doing. When you are out and about you are in general able to use your phone as needed and don't need the earpiece. They are not to be kept on at all times.

Interstitially some of the worst abusers I know are older people, it seems weird to me that they we be dong this.

Quoting OA260 (Reply 5):
so they were both in the wrong IMHO.

  
I will agree with this too. Absolutely, the cashier has no true idea why the call may be important but a quick explanation ("Sorry for being rude, I have to be on this call..." and keeping aware of the cashier and smiling/motioning/interacting as you do what you need to do) will usually keep everything on track.

And in turn I have been to plenty of stores where the cashier does not pay attention to me at all, instead dealing with something else, their manager, another customer, something distracting, and I just go with the flow and will impose if needed. If their service is truly sub-par (I have experienced a cashier on a personal call themselves) I will find a manager and express such or let it be know to the service person themselves.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 3051 posts, RR: 52
Reply 62, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1605 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 60):
Cashiers need the skills to provide friendly and helpful customer service. They also need the ability to listen carefully and show patience to customers who are difficult or upset. If the store has discounts for older customers or sells goods restricted by age, cashiers need the skill to verify age without giving offense. Cashiers need to maintain an appearance and grooming that reflects well on the company and gives the customer confidence.

You can be nice all you want, but what if the distracted customer leaves without paying the correct amount?

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 57):
A person who cannot put up with these minor irritants should not be in the customer service field.

A person who cannot put down their phone for one minute while in a face-to-face situation with another person needs to either get treated for their addiction and/or learn a lesson or two about manners.



The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20784 posts, RR: 62
Reply 63, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1603 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 52):
"Quick"? Hmmmm.

If her brother was indeed waiting for her, a long call wouldn't make sense as they'd be seeing each other momentarily and could speak in person. But that's an assumption not knowing where her brother was waiting. In the car in the parking lot? In a nearby store? At home? We just don't know.

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 54):
How does the customer talking on the phone affect the cashier scanning the item, do you expect the customer to monitor each item being scanned in real time? If the cashier makes a mistake does it becomes customers fault for not catching it real time?

Lots of different things may cause a distraction. The other day the manager of my local Safeway was manning the check-out lane I was in. He must have gotten confused for a moment when I handed him my shopping bag (we have a strong grocery bag recycling culture here, including a ban on plastic bags). When I got home, I looked at my receipt, since the total appeared low. He missed scanning a $7 steak I'd bought. Probably happened while trying to do too many things at once.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 64, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1604 times:
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Quoting trvyyz (Reply 60):
Customer Relations
Cashiers need the skills to provide friendly and helpful customer service.

It isn't the first time I've disagreed with a newspaper article - LOL.

I have very friendly relationships with all the cashiers at my local supermarkets, we joke and laugh together, know each other's names.

But they are are all completely interchangeable - an intermediary between the computer and I - and when the choice is available I use self-service check-out.

That way I provide my own "customer service."  

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 65, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1601 times:

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 62):
You can be nice all you want, but what if the distracted customer leaves without paying the correct amount?

That is not the case here. If the cashier politely requested, any decent customer would be obliged to break the conversation on the phone and make the payment. If the customer ignores and causes undue delay, that is a different story.

[Edited 2013-07-05 14:07:34]

User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 66, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1589 times:
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Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 63):
f her brother was indeed waiting for her, a long call wouldn't make sense as they'd be seeing each other momentarily and could speak in person.

Sure. My point is only that "quick" is both relative - and over-used. She said she "quickly" called her brother - I dunno how she would "slowly" call her brother.

(sidebar: as a language pedant, I don't know what a "quick question" is - it's a question. end sidebar.)

And if her brother was waiting for her, he knew where she was and would, as you say, "be seeing her momentarily", so what was the need for the call?

I also accept that there are people who are addicted to phones and any call, incoming or outgoing, has precedence over anything else they are doing.

mariner

[Edited 2013-07-05 14:16:46]


aeternum nauta
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1374 posts, RR: 10
Reply 67, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1589 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 63):
I looked at my receipt, since the total appeared low.

There have been few instances where, the cashier handed me much larger balance and wait staff didn't add the items ordered. I have brought it to their attention, because I feel it a burden to keep the undeserving money and at the same time do not want the staff to get their wages deducted for these errors.

Quoting mariner (Reply 64):
It isn't the first time I've disagreed with a newspaper article - LOL.

I don't know about your place, but here it is generally regarded as such, especially in retail and interact directly with customers.

Personally, I cut my cell conversation when it is my turn at the counter because I want to ensure the transaction is done properly for my sake. I am not a fan of cell conversation, especially the addictive kind, that is annoying. Even last day I was having a hard time trying to pass a truck and because a guy was on the fast lane below the posted speed only to find that he had his hand stuck to his ear with a cell phone, that not just rude but illegal.

[Edited 2013-07-05 14:23:57]

User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1906 posts, RR: 10
Reply 68, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1579 times:

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 62):
You can be nice all you want, but what if the distracted customer leaves without paying the correct amount?

The cashier is responsible for ensuring correct payment. If the customer tries leaving without giving the correct amount, the cashier must inform them they are still owing money.

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 62):
A person who cannot put down their phone for one minute while in a face-to-face situation with another person needs to either get treated for their addiction and/or learn a lesson or two about manners.

That's of no concern to the cashier.

When I worked at Dairy Queen back when I was 16, I used to serve alcoholics and drug addicts on a nearly daily basis. I didn't refuse service because I took exception to their manners or whatever other problems they had. My job was to serve them their ice cream and that's what I did without trying to be a moral agent about it.



Flying refined.
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 69, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 1579 times:
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Quoting trvyyz (Reply 67):
I don't know about your place, but here it is generally regarded as such, especially in retail and interact directly with customers.

It isn't the first time I've disagreed with a Conventional Wisdom, either.

Time was when we got "customer service" at a gas station. These days (except at a very few places) I fill my tank, check my oil and wash my windscreen - and pay - without any interaction with another human being.

mariner

[Edited 2013-07-05 14:55:49]


aeternum nauta
User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 3051 posts, RR: 52
Reply 70, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1566 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 68):
That's of no concern to the cashier

I know. It was a general statement about people who have trouble putting their phones down.

Quoting WestJet747 (Reply 68):
The cashier is responsible for ensuring correct payment. If the customer tries leaving without giving the correct amount, the cashier must inform them they are still owing money.

They could be in a heated argument with someone over the phone and fail to notice what the cashier says.



The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5734 posts, RR: 10
Reply 71, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1558 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 64):
- and when the choice is available I use self-service check-out.

In general I don't like self service check-outs and normally will avoid them and seek out a staffed check-out. They are sometimes convenient (I use the ones at Home Depot more often than others but still not as a preferred option) and faster but in general I find them annoying. And don't get started on how many people are utterly clueless using them which makes it that I never use one if there isn't an open one.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 72, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1550 times:
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Quoting tugger (Reply 71):
In general I don't like self service check-outs and normally will avoid them and seek out a staffed check-out.

I'm a Luddite, I can have trouble with an on-off switch and so I resist all technology - at first. I own a mobile phone, for emergencies, but have used it once since I bought it nine months ago. But the one time I did use it, it saved my (metaphorical) butt.

At first, I loathed the idea of having to fill my own tank with gas and when I first encountered self-service check-out at a supermarket I resisted that, too. Eventually, I decided to give it a go, to see how awful it was - it had to be.

But after using it, my opinion changed. I seldom have more than a dozen items but even the (staffed) express lane can have a long line - so I use self-service.

And now I can't imagine why I resisted it.

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineBraybuddy From India, joined Aug 2004, 5793 posts, RR: 32
Reply 73, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1538 times:

Quoting tugger (Reply 61):
I think it is absolutely rude and anytime I have been on a call in situations like this (including bank tellers or any situation where there is customer service persons doing an action for me) I will either tell the person I am on the phone with that I will call them right back or I take moment and apologize to the service person for the situation. I also then and pay attention to the service person while I am on the call, ready to be available if needed.

I absolutely abhor rudeness in all walks of life, but I just don't see this woman as being rude at all. Everybody seems to have a different interpretation of the incident, so I suppose I'm coming at it from my own checkout experiences. I rarely use the manned checkouts, but when I do I usually find them an interaction-free zone. I'll usually say "Hi" first, though sometimes the cashier will get in before me, and that's usually the sum total of the interaction. It can take several minutes to scan a trolleyfull of groceries, and if I thought I was expected to stand in silence like a misbehaving schoolboy while madam scans my purchases I will take my business elsewhere.


User currently offlinezippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5501 posts, RR: 13
Reply 74, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1531 times:

Quoting desertjets (Reply 1):
It's rude. If you are interacting with a person who is right in front of you.... even if it is checking out at a grocery store, you should put your call on hold. Same thing for bank tellers, fast food counters, wait staff at restaurants, etc.

And add Hotel registration desks and when y'all are in our house (airport-ticket counter/gates). If it's a bonafide emergency just pause, and acknowledge the clerk, representitive etc and tell him/her briefly my apologies this is an emergency if you do that then you are golden at least in my book.

Just a few days ago, I had an old dude from where else New York (ISP) yapping away but wanting service from me at the gate. The only thing that saved him was his Viet Nam Vet's cap. Otherwise, I was tempted to play with his head and tell him I'm sorry, but you have boarding position D-69! We don't go that high C is it. I notice some, not all from the Northeast USA NY to Maine have seperation anxiety with their cell phones, I Pod, smart phone, dumb phone, whatever and are in a hurry. You don't show me a modicam of courtesy it's difficult for me to return courtesy in kind though, I'm a good actor and for the job can play it up...



I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
User currently offlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5724 posts, RR: 44
Reply 75, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1471 times:
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I am not sure this issue is about phones.. it is more about the "me" attitude of so many people these days.

They are so centred on themselves.

I see it every day...

..what part of your 30+minute train commute made you forget you had to search the depths of your oversize handbag for your train ticket until you were actually standing IN the turnstile?

.. what mind numbing experience in the line at the ticket machine made you forget you were actually going to need money or your CC to purchase the ticket?

.. what engrossing conversation with your "friends" (in person or via some other media) while in the line at the lunch shop made you forget to decide on your desired repast until you are actually speaking to the server?

I am tending towards an opinion that modern technology has placed instant access in the hands of everyone to the point they have lost the ability to plan for the next task. Until actually faced with a specific action people have lost the ability to plan for it!

It might be people have become rude .. might be they have just lost touch with how to interact!!


An aside from a related article in the Sydney Morning Herald.. at the deli counter of a busy supermarket, the Assistant asked who was next,.. a waiting customer not willing to interrupt their phone conversation gestured with a wave of her hand.. the quick response from the deli hand..." who is ready to be next!!" ... to the resounding "good on yer" from several other waiting customers



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 76, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1431 times:
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Quoting stealthz (Reply 75):
I am not sure this issue is about phones.. it is more about the "me" attitude of so many people these days.

I think that's a big part of it. Instant communication means there is now no value in the unexpressed thought - I think or feel it now, so I can and therefore must say it.

We see it all the time on Twitter - how many politicians and celebrities get into trouble because of the instant thoughts and reactions they have Tweeted? It's self-admiration (my thoughts matter!) on a grand scale.

It has its less negative side, though. The aircraft crash at SFO was being reported here on a.net and on Twitter for half an hour before I could find any mention of it in traditional media - and I searched hard, possibly wanting it to be not to be true.

And I shall never forget the morning of 9/11, when a bright and dedicated a.netter was tracking the hijacked aircraft, and reporting the deviations here, for some time before any problem was reported in public.

mariner

[Edited 2013-07-06 18:24:40]


aeternum nauta
User currently offlineVhqpa From Australia, joined Jul 2005, 1485 posts, RR: 1
Reply 77, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1359 times:

Here's my retired copper frill neck's worth,

I'm Cashier at a major Australian supermarket. While I do find it mildly irritating when a customer uses a mobile during the entire transaction I agree that the cashier concerned in the article crossed the line and was in no position whatsoever to get on her moral high horse the deny service. Something I also find frustrating is the customers that insist on wearing dark sunglasses. That doesn't mean I should make them remove their sunglasses. If I were to refuse to serve a customer until they got off the phone (or take their sunglasses off) I'd expect a stern talking to from the manager and rightly so.

Now if a customer comes up that is on the phone I'll just quietly scan and pack their items assuming they want every different type of groceries isolated from each over (ie. Meat in separate bag, Eggs in separate bag etc.) At the end of the order I all I have to do is simply make eye contact with them and almost always they're polite enough to excuse themselves from their conversation while I process the transaction.

Quoting stealthz (Reply 75):
An aside from a related article in the Sydney Morning Herald.. at the deli counter of a busy supermarket, the Assistant asked who was next,.. a waiting customer not willing to interrupt their phone conversation gestured with a wave of her hand.. the quick response from the deli hand..." who is ready to be next!!" ... to the resounding "good on yer" from several other waiting customers

That is actually fairly common. It might be a cultural thing but in Australia at least I've found many people see using mobile phones in such situations as a sign of rudeness. If I serve a customer on the phone I'd say about 50% of the time the following customer what mention how rude the previous customer was. Although the Deli is a little different from the checkout. At the deli the customer needs to interact with the team member and being on a call during that interaction will hold up the following customers.

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 33):
Hypothetically, what if the customer is being abusive or intimidating? What if they're being racist?

Not talking about you specifically. However, I believe that everyone, including customer service folks have the right to remove themselves from a situation where they are the target of aggression, even if it means refusing to serve them. The person behind the counter is also a human being and never agreed to give up their dignity when they signed up for the job.

In those situations the cashier has every right to refuse service and any manager worth their gold would back them up in such circumstances.

Although in my experience aggressive customers are very rare. Most conflicts are disputes about a price and are easily resolved without the need of abuse or intimidation.



"There you go ladies and gentleman we're through Mach 1 the speed of sound no bumps no bangs... CONCORDE"
User currently offlineaerdingus From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 2850 posts, RR: 16
Reply 78, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1360 times:

When I worked in retail, if I had said "hi, hello" to a customer, & still they kept their sunglasses on, or headphones on, or were yapping on the phone, I would get really irked. If they made an effort to say thanks, I let them off the hook.


Cabin crew blog http://dolefuldolegirl.blogspot.ie/
User currently offlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5724 posts, RR: 44
Reply 79, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1357 times:
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Quoting mariner (Reply 76):
It has its less negative side, though. The aircraft crash at SFO was being reported here on a.net and on Twitter for half an hour before I could find any mention of it in traditional media -

Not all positive though,

Self promoters like the COO of Facebook have taken the opportunity of the SFO tragedy to insert them selves in news stories they have no place in. This publicity seeker posts to her 1.2 million followers that she was NOT on the flight, sure she had been perhaps been booked on it at one point but had switched to United so her party could travel using FF miles.
Sheryl.. it isn't about you, you might have shown some concern for the 300+ people affected by this accident... oh but that wouldn't be all about you would it!!



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 80, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1299 times:

Quoting aerdingus (Reply 78):
When I worked in retail, if I had said "hi, hello" to a customer, & still they kept their sunglasses on, or headphones on, or were yapping on the phone, I would get really irked. If they made an effort to say thanks, I let them off the hook.

I went grocery shopping yesterday and while the cashier was checking out my purchases I asked her how often people continue to use their cell phones throughout the check out process. Her response "Many times all day long, sometimes you have to work to get their attention when it's time to pay.". Amazing.

But what gets me very nervous is when someone is using their cell phone while fueling their automobile, truck, etc. There are warnings on the pump not to do this, yet they continue. One time I told the cashier in a gas station that someone was using a cell phone while using the pump. She turned the pump off via remote control and said over the intercom "Your pump will be turned back on when you get off the phone".


User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25563 posts, RR: 86
Reply 81, posted (1 year 4 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1236 times:
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Quoting stealthz (Reply 79):
Self promoters like the COO of Facebook have taken the opportunity of the SFO tragedy to insert them selves in news stories they have no place in.

Oh, I agree. I thought that was one of the grossest pieces of self-admiration I've seen in a while.

mariner



aeternum nauta
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