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Top 10 Countries With The Highest Oil Reserve  
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9169 posts, RR: 15
Posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2418 times:

Anyone has the list?

I guess USA has the most followed by Canada? What about Saudi Arabia and Iraq?

42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20640 posts, RR: 62
Reply 1, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2418 times:

List of countries by proven oil reserves


International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2387 times:
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Venezuela has the most??! Bloody hell. What a supreme example of mis-management.


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User currently offlineAeri28 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 706 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2318 times:

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 1):

OMG. that is the BEST way of providing a link I've seen. My month is complete.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6669 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2263 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 2):
Venezuela has the most??! Bloody hell. What a supreme example of mis-management.

Most oil rich countries with nothing else going on (industry, services etc.) have a large part of their population in poverty, at least in Venezuela they get educated and have health care.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineidealstandard From France, joined Apr 2009, 409 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2246 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 4):
Most oil rich countries with nothing else going on (industry, services etc.) have a large part of their population in poverty, at least in Venezuela they get educated and have health care.

hear hear


User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2246 times:

Venezuela has a HUGE reserve of heavy oil in the Orinoco Basin. Would require a big investment to recover, then to upgrade to a quality that most refineries could handle.

I'm wondering if the Canadian figures take into account the oil sands...probably, as our 'regular' reserves have been exploited for around 65 years now. But there may be shale oil as well, likely not accounted for - same as USA.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlinescbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12569 posts, RR: 46
Reply 7, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2238 times:
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Quoting connies4ever (Reply 6):
Venezuela has a HUGE reserve of heavy oil in the Orinoco Basin. Would require a big investment to recover, then to upgrade to a quality that most refineries could handle.

Given that Venezuela appropriated all the US oil company's assets in the country, I don't see them getting much help to develop it.



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlinevoodoo From Niue, joined Mar 2001, 2074 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2221 times:

Quoting scbriml (Reply 7):
Given that Venezuela appropriated all the US oil company's assets in the country, I don't see them getting much help to develop it.

Valid point but that happened with traditional oil companies whose bottom line is their own bottom line. If the Chinese, or other, state oil companie(s) are interested in contracted development rather than extraction of profit as part of a broader strategic plan, that fear of nationalization may not hold.



` Yeaah! Baade 152! Trabi of the Sky! '
User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1837 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2214 times:

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 6):
I'm wondering if the Canadian figures take into account the oil sands...probably, as our 'regular' reserves have been exploited for around 65 years now. But there may be shale oil as well, likely not accounted for - same as USA.

Venezuela also has oil sands, of a size comparable to the Athabascan fields.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orinoco_oil_sands


User currently offlineoldeuropean From Germany, joined May 2005, 2091 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2203 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 2):
Venezuela has the most??! Bloody hell. What a supreme example of mis-management.

Why is this an example of mis-management?  

It's a wise decision not to digg immediately for all the existing sources.It also stabilizes the prices.

[Edited 2013-07-04 05:47:06]


Wer nichts weiss muss alles glauben
User currently offlinePellegrine From France, joined Mar 2007, 2449 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2187 times:

I love how people talk about topics they know nothing about and form conclusions based on that lack of knowledge to fit their preconcieved notions.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 2):

No one even knew how to develop oil sands only a few years ago. Venezuelan conventional oil, much of which is medium/heavy/extra heavy might consist of 40-60+ billion barrels. The rest is oil sands and requires extreme processing. Even extra heavy oil does not flow through pipelines without being heated. It is like sludge, sand, and grit.

This is why KSA can achieve flow rates in excess of 10 Mb/d while Venezuela maxes out at ~2.75-3 Mb/d.

Saudi oil is mostly light and medium, with some heavy.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 6):

Yes up to date figures for Canada include oil sands. Canada should end up over 200 billion barrels.

I could go on and on, but this is a decent primer:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_...f_countries_by_proven_oil_reserves



oh boy!!!
User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 886 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2184 times:

Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 10):
Why is this an example of mis-management?

I'm thinking RJ meant mis-management of Venezuela in general...

Interesting to see Libya at no. 9. Small population of 6 million, properly managed and with Gaddafi gone they could live well.



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20640 posts, RR: 62
Reply 13, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2185 times:

Quoting Pellegrine (Reply 11):
I could go on and on, but this is a decent primer:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_...erves

That goes to the same place as the link I gave out. Was there a different page you wanted to link?



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 14, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2156 times:
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Quoting Aesma (Reply 4):
Most oil rich countries with nothing else going on (industry, services etc.) have a large part of their population in poverty, at least in Venezuela they get educated and have health care.

I see that, but then we're not talking about a country with plenty of oil, we're talking about the one with the MOST.

Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 10):
Why is this an example of mis-management?

It's a wise decision not to digg immediately for all the existing sources.It also stabilizes the prices.

Because even if you don't dig immediately for all of it, the fact is that the country is extremely oil-rich, and yet is a complete and utter mess. The two things might not be exactly linked, but it's reasonable to surmise that the country with the largest oil reserves in the world probably shouldn't ever run out of toilet roll, for example.

Quoting offloaded (Reply 12):
I'm thinking RJ meant mis-management of Venezuela in general...

  



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 886 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2134 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 14):
The two things might not be exactly linked, but it's reasonable to surmise that the country with the largest oil reserves in the world probably shouldn't ever run out of toilet roll, for example.

I'm not so sure. I lived in Libya in the 80s and you couldn't buy toilet roll. They simply ran out. People started stealing it from hotels; you issued your guests with 3 sheets only if they needed to use your facilities. It even came down to 1/4 dinar notes. It was pretty bad for a while I can tell you.



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 16, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2122 times:
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Quoting offloaded (Reply 15):
I'm not so sure. I lived in Libya in the 80s and you couldn't buy toilet roll. They simply ran out. People started stealing it from hotels; you issued your guests with 3 sheets only if they needed to use your facilities. It even came down to 1/4 dinar notes. It was pretty bad for a while I can tell you.

I'm not suggesting it's unique, but it definitely shouldn't happen - I'm sure you'd agree with that, having experienced it yourself. There are many examples of oil-rich countries who fail to use their considerable wealth properly for the benefit of the people. Nigeria springs to mind as another prime example.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1112 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2091 times:

Quoting offloaded (Reply 12):

Well, despite what our media are telling us, they were doing quite well before the war. High litteracy rate. Best human development index in Africa. Ranking 48 in the world. Better than Russia...

Of course, it is hard to believe after the Western media machine has done its demonizing work of the last two years but you can look it up...


User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 3024 posts, RR: 36
Reply 18, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2077 times:
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Quoting connies4ever (Reply 6):
I'm wondering if the Canadian figures take into account the oil sands...probably, as our 'regular' reserves have been exploited for around 65 years now. But there may be shale oil as well, likely not accounted for - same as USA.

The problem with oil sands and shale vs traditional crude is the return per ton after refining, the Orinoco reserves are highly variable in that measure to date, but no large scale exploitation has yet taken place to get a good baseline. The Athabaskan tar sands on the other hand are a known value.



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6669 posts, RR: 11
Reply 19, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2069 times:

Quoting A380900 (Reply 17):
Well, despite what our media are telling us, they were doing quite well before the war. High litteracy rate. Best human development index in Africa. Ranking 48 in the world. Better than Russia...

Of course, it is hard to believe after the Western media machine has done its demonizing work of the last two years but you can look it up...

Well that's precisely why the war happened (and the revolution in Tunisia), educated people don't want to live in a dictatorship.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1112 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1957 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 19):
Well that's precisely why the war happened (and the revolution in Tunisia), educated people don't want to live in a dictatorship.

That can explain why there were some protests after the Tunisian upheaval. However these protests were not powerful enough to really bring Gaddafi down (probably because many more Libyans than we were led to believe were quite content with the state of affairs - as people usually are in other petromonarchies).

And then Western powers decided to get rid of Gaddafi without any relations to the level of education or well-being there. And you can be sure it's going to go down.

I am a little bit unsettled that people fall so easily for the "democracy vs dictature" mumbo jumbo that Western powers tout every time they intervene somewhere. Do Western powers care about democracy in Saudi Arabia? In Bahrein? Or before the Arab Spring in Egypt, Tunisia or Syria? Not at all...

Libya has been plunged into civil war because it served Western powers interest and that Gaddafi was a little too tough in his negotiations to sell his ressources to the West. I think you should take a step back from everything that we hear everytime war is on the menu. It is 90% balloney.


User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 886 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1938 times:

Quoting A380900 (Reply 20):

With respect, I lived there for 8 years and still have quite a few Libyan friends, so I have some clue when it comes to Libya. Without question, ALL of them feel Libya is better without Gaddafi, and the country is absolutely not about to break down into civil war. Obviously after 40 years of the Colonel there are bound to be serious issues.



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineRomeoBravo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1934 times:

Quoting A380900 (Reply 20):
That can explain why there were some protests after the Tunisian upheaval. However these protests were not powerful enough to really bring Gaddafi down (probably because many more Libyans than we were led to believe were quite content with the state of affairs - as people usually are in other petromonarchies).

And then Western powers decided to get rid of Gaddafi without any relations to the level of education or well-being there. And you can be sure it's going to go down.

I am a little bit unsettled that people fall so easily for the "democracy vs dictature" mumbo jumbo that Western powers tout every time they intervene somewhere. Do Western powers care about democracy in Saudi Arabia? In Bahrein? Or before the Arab Spring in Egypt, Tunisia or Syria? Not at all...

Libya has been plunged into civil war because it served Western powers interest and that Gaddafi was a little too tough in his negotiations to sell his ressources to the West. I think you should take a step back from everything that we hear everytime war is on the menu. It is 90% balloney.

Of course he did declare war on his own people. But whatever...


User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1112 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1898 times:

Quoting offloaded (Reply 21):
With respect, I lived there for 8 years and still have quite a few Libyan friends, so I have some clue when it comes to Libya. Without question, ALL of them feel Libya is better without Gaddafi, and the country is absolutely not about to break down into civil war. Obviously after 40 years of the Colonel there are bound to be serious issues.

I've never lived there nor do I have friends there. I respect that you do. I'm just quoting the United Nations' HDI (Human Development Index). I sure hope it will move up from 48 but I have my doubts if Iraq is any sign. The mere idea that after Iraq, Western powers can think that their interventions will do more good than harm and that plenty of government worshipping citizens still believe them "no questions asked" is mind boggling to me.

The hypocrisy of Western governments knows no bound as the Bahrein and Saudi Arabia examples shows when it comes to democracy. One thing is sure, like in Iraq, ressources will be flowing towards our shores. But this idea that we're doing it "for the good of the people there" is preposterous. It is quite certain Libyan people will get less from their ressources than they used to. Gaddafi was asking too much of a cut on "OUR NATURAL RESSOUCES". And I'm not even getting into the personal issues between Sarkozy and Gaddafi that really could in an instant make every cheerleader like a dimwits (Sarkozy is very seriously suspected of having received Libyan funding for his 2007 election and many suspect in France it has played a huge role in his objective of taking Gaddafi down after things went sour). What do war cheeleaders have to say about this one? They are a sorry bunch being manipulated with "Human Rights" rhetoric while some politicians get bigger swimming pools. Very sad.

Quoting RomeoBravo (Reply 22):
Of course he did declare war on his own people. But whatever...

God how I wish I could trust my government and my media to always do/say the right thing like you do. I'm sure you live a happy life. What exactly does "declare war on his own people" even mean? You're just repeating some pro-war talking point without even being aware of it. Wake up.

[Edited 2013-07-05 05:59:38]

User currently offlineRomeoBravo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1872 times:

Quoting A380900 (Reply 23):
God how I wish I could trust my government and my media to always do/say the right thing like you do.

If you've ever interacted with me you'll notice i'm one of the most anti-government people on here. Whilst here you are defending an oppressive, authoritarian regime that ruled by the sword.


25 Flighty : Oil (and oil money) are generally a tragedy for most countries that have it. What are the very talented people of Venezuela and Saudi Arabia contribut
26 A380900 : Good for you. But then I would suggest you'd be a little more suspicious of the government's motives whenever it tells you it wants to go to war. "Wa
27 RomeoBravo : You're tilting at windmills. I was against intervention in Libya, as i am with all tax-funded wars that don't concern the defence of the country i li
28 cybergus : Which Venezuela are you talking about? Please document a little bit more and bring some substantial proofs to your statement. The programs in educati
29 photopilot : What a sad and/or arrogant statement to make from someone so young as to not have experienced the world. A rather naive statement. You're too young t
30 Post contains links and images Acheron : It's not like they are going at it on their own... Let's just say they decided to seek partnerships with countries less prone to invading others over
31 cptkrell : I guess I'd comment that the Arabic-Hindu numeral system has already contributed greatly to how the whole world works. I'd also say that has and stil
32 einsteinboricua : It's not so much sparing your supply as it is discovering more and more as you go. The Orinoco oil basin was found to have plenty of oil only a few y
33 Arrow : Gas in Vancouver area right now is $1.43/liter which is more than $5/USgallon -- but gasoline in Canada (and most other places) is taxed at a pretty
34 Post contains images mham001 : I recommend you do a little research before blasting somebody for commenting on what is common knowledge in the oil industry. It is a proven fact tha
35 Pellegrine : Thank you, but yes I know Venezuelan oil production has fallen. Not due to the reasons you have given I am afraid. That is your own conclusion, and i
36 connies4ever : Currently in Alberta it's about 1/3 BOE to get a barrel of oil, energy-wise. If the operators chose to switch to newer technology, this energy input
37 Post contains images Flighty : You'll have to try to excuse my poor taste and possible mental insanity. Youth or any lack of travel are not excuses I can utilize Maybe the original
38 Post contains images connies4ever : I see. This explains all our political issues in Canada. I did not realise we were living in a dictatorship. Things are rarely as straightforward as
39 mham001 : Of course there are technical reasons why production has fallen, a primary one being their inability to develop Orinoco. And the reason why they have
40 Pellegrine : This is ongoing. The infrastructure to develop this takes years, decades, to develop. You can't snap your fingers and do it. It is actually even more
41 Post contains images AyostoLeon : I am (OK, I admit it, am not) surprised at the amount of animosity that a simple question of who has the largest proven supplies of oil can generate.
42 Pellegrine : Speaking about mismanagement and North Sea oil reserves, those two go hand in hand in a different sort of way. The UK rushed in the 80s to be an oil
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