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Photos Of The Titanic In Colour Released Interiors  
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26957 posts, RR: 58
Posted (12 months 16 hours ago) and read 3097 times:

Thought I would share this link :


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...us-ship-extraordinary-results.html

Some lovely photos of the Titanic and the interiors. The Titanic's Cafe Parisien is one of my favourites!

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 1, posted (12 months 16 hours ago) and read 3064 times:

Thank you SO much for finding that and sharing it, OA260 - I've always been fascinated by the Titanic, and those pictures 'bring it to life' as never before. Agree with you about the Cafe' Parisien,' too.  


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineCPH-R From Denmark, joined May 2001, 5991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (12 months 16 hours ago) and read 3049 times:

I'm slightly curious about this line though:

Quote:
Mr Logvnenko chose green and gold decoration to illustrate the opulence of the suites

Surely it wouldn't be too difficult to find out what the actual colours were and use those instead?


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7702 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (12 months 15 hours ago) and read 3015 times:
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Nice pictures. Interesting however, that in the comments section someone claiming to be the artist has flagged a number of errors. These include the fact that he's Ukrainian, not Russian, and that he didn't colourise all of the photos shown. He neglected to say that his name was written incorrectly though.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3063 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (12 months 15 hours ago) and read 3015 times:

Excellent find.

However, I began to question the author's knowledge about Titanic. Look at the first and last pictures. That's Olympic. The A-Deck (the one below the boat deck) runs completely from bow to stern in open air. Titanic's A-Deck is interrupted by windows as opposed to an open promenade.

Olympic
Titanic



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8507 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (12 months 14 hours ago) and read 2991 times:

I'm not really a fan of colorizing photographs, personally. Let b&w photography stand on its own, I say, but it's become really popular these days to Photoshop those old pictures.

[Edited 2013-09-07 07:05:13]

User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7702 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (12 months 12 hours ago) and read 2912 times:
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Quoting MD-90 (Reply 5):
I'm not really a fan of colorizing photographs, personally. Let b&w photography stand on its own, I say, but it's become really popular these days to Photoshop those old pictures.

There's no reason why it can't still stand on its own. It's interesting to get at least an indicative image of how things looked in real life though, just so long as it's understood that they are just that - an indication; a potential interpretation.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineGrisee08 From United States of America, joined Mar 2013, 356 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 months 11 hours ago) and read 2875 times:
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Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 4):
That's Olympic. The A-Deck (the one below the boat deck) runs completely from bow to stern in open air. Titanic's A-Deck is interrupted by windows as opposed to an open promenade.

At the time the photo in question of TITANIC had been taken, the promenade deck had not been completely built, nor had the bridge and many other rooms and items. It was still basically just a shell which had left its slip. In reality, that particular photo cannot be confirmed as OLYMPIC or TITANIC.



You're Losing The Game!
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26957 posts, RR: 58
Reply 8, posted (12 months 10 hours ago) and read 2844 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 1):
Thank you SO much for finding that and sharing it, OA260 - I've always been fascinated by the Titanic

No probs   I am the same always been amazed by it. My Grandmother was also so thats maybe where I got the interest. I remember the first movie I saw ''A night to remember'' as a Kid.

I am ashamed to say I still have not yet gone to the Titanic museum in Belfast despite being so close. I keep saying to my mates we should go sometime. Maybe now the busy tourist season is coming to an end. It has exceeded all expectations and contributed to a lot of the income for Belfast tourism this year.

Here is a pic of it I took a few weeks back :

http://i955.photobucket.com/albums/ae40/PhilipOA260/bfstit_zps8b4ae76d.jpg

Titanic's success highlights need for more attractions

In its first 12 months Titanic Belfast has smashed all estimations for visitor numbers and things are looking good for year two as David Elliott reports

It has now welcomed over one million visitors through its doors since opening on March 31, 2012 – close to the 100th anniversary of the ship's sinking – and beaten many targets along the way.
Commentators had initially said the 290,000 target, set out by the National Audit Office, in the exhibition's first year was a tall order, while the 400,000 needed to make it a commercial success were just a pipe dream.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/bu...for-more-attractions-29493219.html


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 9, posted (11 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2703 times:

The Museum looks terrific, OA260 (from the inside, anyway; regarding the outside, I'd better not post my opinion of modern architecture!).

As it happens, the Titanic disaster is very well-documented. An American writer, Walter Lord, wrote a truly-marvellous book about it, "A Night To Remember"; He pioneered a new style of historical writing, basing most of it on interviews with actual survivors, including the 'truly heroic' Second Officer, Charles Lightoller, who organised the loading of passengers into the lifeboats. Lightoller survived the sinking (by sitting on an upturned boat all night) and later served in the Royal Navy through WW1 (getting sunk again, twice!). Lord's book was a worldwide bestseller; and I discover that it's still available, on Amazon, for about $15! Well worth 'investing' in it!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Night_to_Remember_(book)

The book served an important purpose, in that, up to that time, many historians had blamed the heavy loss of life (only about 700 survivors out of about 2,200 on board) on 'class prejudice,' third class passengers being locked up below decks, etc. while first and second classes were allowed on to the boat-deck. Based on interviews with Lightoller and other survivors, Lord was able to show that the heavy loss of life had a lot more to do with the fact that the ship only had boats for 1,200 people. The ship also developed a heavy list, so that not all the lifeboats could be lowered; and, in addition, the Titanic had been widely advertised as 'unsinkable.' A lot of people were reluctant to commit themselves to being lowered fifty feet to the waters of the Atlantic, in open boats, so that a lot of the boats were lowered only half-full.

It's also fair to say that the old principle - 'Women and Children First' - was very largely followed; meaning that very few men survived.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Lightoller

There was a very good film about it too, largely-based on Lord's book. This was probably the 'key scene' as far as lifeboats were concerned:-

http://www.criterion.com/films/521-a-night-to-remember

[Edited 2013-09-07 23:04:31]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25205 posts, RR: 22
Reply 10, posted (11 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2537 times:

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 5):
I'm not really a fan of colorizing photographs, personally. Let b&w photography stand on its own, I say, but it's become really popular these days to Photoshop those old pictures.

Agree. The same with old b&w movies that have been colorized. Much prefer the original.


User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3063 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (11 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2502 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 9):
The book served an important purpose, in that, up to that time, many historians had blamed the heavy loss of life (only about 700 survivors out of about 2,200 on board) on 'class prejudice,' third class passengers being locked up below decks, etc. while first and second classes were allowed on to the boat-deck. Based on interviews with Lightoller and other survivors, Lord was able to show that the heavy loss of life had a lot more to do with the fact that the ship only had boats for 1,200 people. The ship also developed a heavy list, so that not all the lifeboats could be lowered; and, in addition, the Titanic had been widely advertised as 'unsinkable.' A lot of people were reluctant to commit themselves to being lowered fifty feet to the waters of the Atlantic, in open boats, so that a lot of the boats were lowered only half-full.

It's also fair to say that the old principle - 'Women and Children First' - was very largely followed; meaning that very few men survived.

Not to mention that the crew was completely inexperienced with emergency procedures since no drill was ever done before or during the voyage.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineTheCommodore From Australia, joined Dec 2007, 2853 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (11 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2501 times:

Yeah,
Thanks for posting the link to these wonderful old pics of a very beautiful boat.



Flown 905,468 kms or 2.356 times to the moon, 1296 hrs, Longest flight 10,524 kms
User currently offlinePellegrine From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2439 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (11 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2490 times:

Quoting OA260 (Thread starter):
Some lovely photos of the Titanic and the interiors. The Titanic's Cafe Parisien is one of my favourites!

I'm with you, I'd be hanging out there. And I'd also be steaming in the huge suite with the private promenade.



oh boy!!!
User currently offlinekl671 From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 141 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (11 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2440 times:

Quoting Grisee08 (Reply 7):
In reality, that particular photo cannot be confirmed as OLYMPIC or TITANIC.

The last photo is definately the Titanic, taken during her launch.

The Olympic's hull was painted white for her launch, for photography reasons. Apparently this was a common practice for the first ship of its class in the days of black and white phototography.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPmN5rFMvjE

Edited to add youtube link.

[Edited 2013-09-09 01:39:15]

User currently offlinena From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10707 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (11 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 2378 times:

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 5):
I'm not really a fan of colorizing photographs, personally. Let b&w photography stand on its own

I agree. Only if the real colours are known for sure, I am fine with it, if its done properly. If the real colours are not known, dont colourize.
As for the Titanic photos, I think the colourization could have been done better.


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 16, posted (11 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2180 times:

Quoting kl671 (Reply 14):
The last photo is definately the Titanic, taken during her launch.

Thanks for confirming that, kl671.

It's not generally appreciated that there was an 'industrial revolution' going on at the time. Only twenty years previously, such huge ships could not really have been contemplated; fifty years previously, the majority of ships (for passengers as well as cargo) were sailing ships. I still marvel at the fact that such ships could be built at all at the time - given that 'shipbuilding' in those days was very largely a matter of 'hammer and chisel' stuff, very little mechanisation.

And they didn't just build liners, either; I had an uncle who'd served in a battleship at Jutland in 1916. Though he didn't see much of the battle; he was a stoker, he told me that all he really 'saw' was the boilers, a shovel, and huge heaps of coal.....  

Scroll down and you'll see some (black-and-white  Smile) photographs of the huge (and numerous) battleships that both sides were able to build by that time:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Jutland

[Edited 2013-09-12 06:16:12]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
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