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What Do You Think Of Ross Perot?  
User currently offlineAirworthy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1379 times:

He hasn't been in the news for a while now. Despite his appearance what do you think of him?

Some people think that he made his money in the oil business, but actually he made it when he founded Electronic Data Systems.

I think he had good intentions during the '92 campaign, but he made some personal attacks at George H.W. Bush that weren't good.

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1372 times:

I don't.

 Big thumbs up

He's a lunatic. 'Nuff said.


User currently offlineTWAL1011 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 206 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1368 times:

I concur. Perot is pretty whacked.

User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1352 times:

For a generally conservative man, he had some forward thinking ideas frequently at odds with the establishment. For that I give him credit.

He took on the two party system with cash and aggressive business ideas...so well he actually scared em. For that I applaud him.

But he was used to running his business world as a benevolent dictator, and that is at odds with democracy, which likely would have made him an atrocious President. He tried to mold the Reform Party that he created, shaping it to his worldview and it ignored him and instead just morphed into this silly amalgmation of wackos rather than the viable home for much needed moderation it could have become.

Definately a charector. By the way, a great book on Ross is "Irreconcilable Differences" the story of how he sold EDS in the 80s to General Motors with the understanding that many of his can-do pep club business models would crack the stodgy old boy-ism of the mighty carmaker. GM Chairman Roger Smith (of Roger & Me fame) told him to buzz off, then paid nearly a billion to get rid of him. Great read.


User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1350 times:

Perot had some interesting ideas, but it is thanks to his ill-concieved '92 campaign that Clinton came to power. Had he stepped aside at the last moment, the conservative vote would not have been fragmented, and George Bush would have been reelected. Most voters that year wanted a conservative president.

Charles


User currently offlineTbar220 From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7013 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1348 times:

He made for some great humor on Saturday Night Live  Big thumbs up


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User currently offlineSccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5584 posts, RR: 28
Reply 6, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1338 times:

OK, this is for real. He gets his hair cut at the same barber shop that I patronize, and waits his turn, without complaint, like any other patron.

Built a heck of a company, his leadership could have been pivotal for GM when GM bought EDS, but (as Heavy noted above) Roger Smith was too much of a moron to accept competent help from a strong personality.

Do wish he had not screwed up the '92 elections.



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1334 times:

Perot had some interesting ideas, but it is thanks to his ill-concieved '92 campaign that Clinton came to power.

I think Clinton would have won in either event. I don't think Bush would have made up all 8 percentage points if old Ross hadn't run.


User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1330 times:

I agree with Alpha. Ross didn't run as a "conservative", per se. In fact, as I pointed out, many of his ideas made the GOP nervous. I think he attracted a generous number of Reagan Democrats who were fed up with Bush I and would have otherwise stayed hom or voted for Clinton.

Also the original post brings up "personal attacks against Bush"....I seem to recall Perot got infuriated once he uncovered the GOP "dirty tricks" team operating covertly, in one instance I believe actually at his daughter's wedding. Perot rightly raised hell about it in the media, exposing their schemes in the light of day. The Bush campaign and the GOP tried brushing his accusations off, but it unnerved them.

The one group of people who should have been taking notes as to the levels the Repubs were willing to go to dig up any kind of dirt were in Little Rock. They didn't and it came back to nearly destroy them 6 years later.


User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (11 years 12 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1321 times:

I think that the Reform Party, which evolved from the United We Stand organization that was Perot's campaign machine in 1992, will always be the legacy of Perot. Unfortunately, Pat Buchanan had to come in there in 2000 and cause the party to split in two. Members of the party became part of either the Buchanan Wing (the 'official' Reform Party) or the Ventura Wing (the more grassroots of the two wings). Ventura at this time was really the party's standard bearer because he was the first Reform Party candidiate to win a major office, and he felt that Buchanan coming in and hijacking the party away from him and the party leadership effectively ended any chances of the party becoming a major third party. This is part of the reasons why Ventura is not seeking a second term and is retiring from politics. Ross Perot chose the stay away from this fight, and was wrong to do so. He said he didn't want to alienate any members of the party, and felt that had he chose sides on the conflict in the party, that it would have caused even further divisions.

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