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Japan Calls For Crackdown On US Military Crime  
User currently offlineManni From South Korea, joined Nov 2001, 4221 posts, RR: 23
Posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1564 times:



http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=578&ncid=578&e=10&u=/nm/20021204/ts_nm/crime_japan_usa_rape_dc


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8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKLAX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1545 times:

Its about time the little buttholes goofing off over there and raping young women get what they deserve. They dishonor the entire US armed forces...

-Clovis


User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2732 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1524 times:

Not sure why Yahoo is talking about this but I can assure you there is no furor in Japan over this at the moment. Ms. Lies (great name for a journo.) has made some serious errors.

The status of forces agreement has already been altered to allow trial of US servicemen by Japanese authorities, hence the sentencing of Airman Woodland so we should ask ourselves what exactly her point is ? US authorities were reluctant to agree to this and in this case I can't say I blame them. Japanese justice is based on responsibility and contrition not guilt or innocence. Accused or their defenders would be lost in this system. Airman Woodland's sentence of 32 months is a VERY long one by local standards.

A well publicised rape case involving 18 members of a prestigious University's rugby team at the same time was settled out of court following apologies and compensation. Foreigners in Japan are frankly unable to offer the correct style and quantity of responsibility and normally receive longer sentences as a result.

The real problem of US forces in Japan is their concentration in Okinawa. This is clearly the fault of the Japanese government requiring Okinawa to shoulder more of the burden than their size and population makes fair. Again it is the Japanese government failing to address this legitimate complaint as US forces base themselves where the Japanese government supplies their bases. US bases outside of Okinawa have relatively few problems !

One last point, men of that age will invariably commit violent crime no matter where they live or where they came from. The Japanese Army's only heavy division, the 3rd Armoured Division is based just down the road and most school girls here are advised at school to beware of them and to avoid contact with them due to high incidences of violent crime by these guys. Japanese MP's patrol the 'entertainment' district regularly and for good reason in my experience.

Is the Japanese government publicly calling for their sensure and control and is Ms.Lies writing about it ? No, why not I wonder ?



" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16248 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1506 times:

32 months for rape is not a very long sentence. The victim may be suffering for much longer than that.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2732 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1470 times:

It is very long by Japanese standards. Prison is the absolute last resort, most sentences are suspended on appeal anyway.


" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
User currently offlineRai From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1473 times:

It is very long by Japanese standards. Prison is the absolute last resort, most sentences are suspended on appeal anyway.

Hey, Grant. Japan still has the death penalty, right? How often is it used? And in what cases is it assigned?


User currently offlineCedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 8086 posts, RR: 54
Reply 6, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1471 times:

To say there is no furore isn't quite accurate, there is no denying that there is a certain resentment bred by US bases in foreign countries, and while the culprits may be statistically tiny beyond measuring, there have been cases where US servicemen and women have been atrocious ambassadors for their country. I'm not talking about the bases in Saudi, I read a book called Blowback by an ex FBI guy (which actually made no mention of the ME in it's 400+ pages) which was basically about the 'consequences of empire' (hence the title) and the list of children and others killed in road accidents or women attacked (in S Korea, Japan, Okinawa, Italy etc) by (sometimes drunk, invariably irresponsible) US servicemen was chilling, not to mention that nearly all of them pretty much went unpunished. And while it may not be big (ie popular) news at home, it goes far from unnoticed in the countries in which is occurs. (The book, btw, started with a detailed case of the low flying USAF fighter that sent a dozen ski-lift occupants to their death, you get the picture.)


fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineRai From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1458 times:

To say there is no furore isn't quite accurate, there is no denying that there is a certain resentment bred by US bases in foreign countries, and while the culprits may be statistically tiny beyond measuring, there have been cases where US servicemen and women have been atrocious ambassadors for their country. I'm not talking about the bases in Saudi, I read a book called Blowback by an ex FBI guy (which actually made no mention of the ME in it's 400+ pages) which was basically about the 'consequences of empire' (hence the title) and the list of children and others killed in road accidents or women attacked (in S Korea, Japan, Okinawa, Italy etc) by (sometimes drunk, invariably irresponsible) US servicemen was chilling, not to mention that nearly all of them pretty much went unpunished. And while it may not be big (ie popular) news at home, it goes far from unnoticed in the countries in which is occurs. (The book, btw, started with a detailed case of the low flying USAF fighter that sent a dozen ski-lift occupants to their death, you get the picture.)

Like all your posts, they seem to have some sort of political agenda. No offense, but I take PacificJourney's word over yours since he actually lives in the country and certainly has a better perspective of the events than you do.

I'm not going to say that all US military personnel stationed overseas are angels. Hell, I met a few of them in Korea whom I would consider assholes. But the vast majority of them are decent, law-abiding folk who have a job to do and do it to the best of their ability.

Accidents happen everywhere, and the US military is not immune to them, just like what happened to Korea. Don’t tell me that other nations' troops stationed overseas are immune to them? But what you’ll never hear about are the way many US military personnel are poorly treated for doing nothing but wearing their uniform. Now, do you know who Dr. David Barry is? I didn’t think so…because the press, especially in Korea, would never mention such a thing.

Remember, there are two sides to every story…and you’re only apt on relaying just one.


User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2732 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1448 times:

I meant that there was no outcry over this particular case, possibly because the victim was a Phillipina. This is actually the first I have heard of it. I can't speak for other countries but another problem here is that US srvicemen don't leave their bases very often and mix with the locals. Younger people especially can't afford to so they socialise only on base and amongst themselves.

Rai

Japan certainly does have a death penalty and a very interesting story it is. The whole thing is extremely secret and information hard to come by. Most Japanese know nothing about it, even that it exists.

From what I know it was carried out 8 times in 2001 and 15 times in 2000. The carrying out and location of sentence is totally secret and not announced until at least one month later, even to the executed's family. There is no notice to the person to be executed either, one minute it's breakfast, the next .... The method used is hanging. Scary stuff !

Don't quote me but there is also something about women not being subject to the death penalty.



" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
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