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Could I Use Aviation Oil In My Car?  
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 6 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 5786 times:

It'd be more expensive, but what would happen?

'Speed

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7772 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (11 years 6 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 5781 times:

As far as I know oil designed for use in aviation piston engines is also designed to work with the leaded av-gas that they use. So since it isn't formulated for automotive engines I wouldn't put it in your car.


Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 2, posted (11 years 6 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5763 times:

Isn't it possible to use oil that you've previously used to cook with in a diesel car???

User currently offlineIllini_152 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (11 years 6 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5758 times:

Not only that, but even the multigrade aviation oils have a much higher viscosity than their automotive equivilants.

Most cars today run on eihter 5W30 dino oil or 0W30 synthetic. Older cars might use 10W30 in the warmer months. The common aircraft grade is 15W50, with some warmer climates running straight 50 weight oil. I sure as hell wouldn't want that thick stuff running through my car's engine. Aircraft engines are air cooled and need a thicker oil, cars need a thinner oil.



Happy contrails - I support B747Skipper and Jetguy
User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8702 posts, RR: 43
Reply 4, posted (11 years 6 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 5737 times:

Dan, it may work with some tractors and tanks, but not with common diesel cars. Maybe the Humvee is an exception, but it's not that common...  Big grin
In some diesel cars, processed colza oil can be used as fuel, but it will result in higher wear. For example, the fuel pump(s) will have a much shorter service life if colza oil is used.
Broadly, organic fuels are based on the lipids the raw materials they are produced from contain. Process them (if necessary) and they can be used as fuels.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineGalaxy5 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 2034 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (11 years 6 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5690 times:

are we talking about turbine engine aviation oil? or recip?

dont even think about using turbine oil, you will destroy your car engine.



"damn, I didnt know prince could Ball like that" - Charlie Murphy
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 6 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5676 times:

Guys,

I'm not going to put aviation oil in my car. I was just wondering what would happen if I did.

Galaxy5: Recip.

'Speed


User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 6 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 5669 times:

I'm not going to put aviation oil in my car. I was just wondering what would happen if I did

Both lines of questioning will result in the same answer(s).....

You'll probably either destroy your engine or reduce it's life dramatically. No neccessaryily because of the formulation, but because viscosities for aircraft engines are not compatible with the average car.



User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1028 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (11 years 6 months 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 5646 times:

It is possible to use an aircraft oil in an automotive gasoline engine, Aeroshell AD65 for example is an oil that could be used. This is a SAE 30w ashless dispersant oil to which you may have to, depending on camshaft type, add an extreme pressure additive. Zinc is the EP additive in most auto oils. Also when using aircraft oil, more frequent changes are a good idea.

The use of aircraft oil was specified in the Chevrolet Power Manual back in the late 80's when running Chevrolet racing engines. I haven't seen a Chevrolet Power Manual in years, so I don't know what they recommend now.

Question is, unless you have a stockpile of aircraft oil in AD65 that is nearing its expiration date, or have a race car, why go to all the trouble and expense to use it in your car? I myself wouldn't use it in new or later model vehicles.

Now here's the disclaimer. If you use any oil in your vehicle which is NOT specified by the manufacturer, you're doing it on your own. They, the manufacturer, nor I am responsible for damage to your engine caused by using it.


T prop.



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