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The Autobahn  
User currently offlineCharleslp From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 336 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1684 times:

I heard that the some sections of the Autobahn have no speed limit. However, I also heard that most of the Autobahn has speed limits, but they are around 80mph (130 km/h) and are "recommended" speed limits. Is this true?

67 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8617 posts, RR: 43
Reply 1, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1651 times:

Vast parts of the Autobahn have no speed limit at all. You can do whatever you want. However, there is the "recommended speed", which is indeed 130 km/h. If you do more, you can be judged partially guilty of crashes, for example. But in the end, you can do those 250 km/h or more legally in Germany.


Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1627 times:

In dense areas, there are speed limits, which makes sense. I think the lack of speed limits forces people to drive more prudently. You don't get people hogging the left lane in Germany because they know soon enough somebody will be coming along at over 200 km/h.

I wish speed limits would increase in North America. For instance in Portugal, the speed limit is 120 km/h, and anything 30 km/h over the limit is seen as a minor infraction. I think this is a good system and would work well in North America. You could drive at 130 or 140 and the worst you'd get is a minor ticket. Most people drive 120 to 130 anyways, and outside the cities, many drive at 140 if the weather is good.



"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8617 posts, RR: 43
Reply 3, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1618 times:

"You don't get people hogging the left lane in Germany because they know soon enough somebody will be coming along at over 200 km/h."

Now how nice would that be... Sometimes, there's just that little Fiat Punto in the far left lane of a three-lane (in each direction) Autobahn, doing 110 km/h whilst trying deperately to pass those trucks and making you slam the brakes. But doing 150 and being passed like wooooosh by a beemer isn't that great either.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineCharleslp From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 336 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1616 times:

The problem with many local areas is that some towns are "speed traps," which means that some cops are desparate for money. As for increasing the speed limit, you might need to "improve" the driver education program before doing so.

User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8617 posts, RR: 43
Reply 5, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1611 times:

"As for increasing the speed limit, you might need to "improve" the driver education program before doing so."

Sounds logical to me. Wanna know what I spent on my driver's license? Some 1700 €, all in all... However, as for speeding traps - they're a real plague over here. The worst are those in residential areas which take a neat photo of you doing 35 km/h, where 30 is allowed. "Reason": playing children. Children you've seen playing during the last 20 minutes: zero. Real reason: They need money.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineMx5_boy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1606 times:

I wish they would *up* the speed limits on some of our freeways.

The state limit is 110km/h and most people when there is little traffic do around 140km/h.

We also have these annoying *variable speed limit signs* which change the speed limit due to the conditions.

Also springing up all over the state is *permanent speed limit cameras* where you get 3 warning signs before the speeding camera. Everyone just slows down as they pass them then speed right back up.

mb

clown cars are evil


User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1614 times:

Autobahns and ... Americans... (the 90 km/h people) -
xxx
Due to the oil crisis in October 1973, in the USA, maximum speed was reduced by federal law to 55 mph (88 km/h) everywhere...
xxx
In Germany, the good little soldiers of the US Army were told not too drive over 88 km/h... on the autobahns... the result is, there were many accidents. US Forces personnel based in Germany had twice or three times the incidence of accidents... Americans are know as "dangerous drivers" in Germany...
xxx
You want to drive in Germany - conform to their "normal speeds" - I would personally recommend 120 to 140 km/h as "standard" speed (about 75 to 90 mph) if you are a little lady going to church service in Mannheim...
xxx
And stay AWAY from the left lane at these slow speed... When you are SLOW drive on the RH side of the road...
xxx
And when some Audi or Mercedes flash headlights - means "clear the way" - these guys are closing on your rear - at 180-250 km/h...
xxx
(s) Skipper  Smile


User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8617 posts, RR: 43
Reply 8, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1601 times:

Oh yeah! The flashing headlights! It's actually allowed to do that! IN GERMANY!


Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineBlatantEcho From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1896 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1598 times:

Plain and simple, while raising the speed limit in the US would be great, I don't wanna see it until driver certification and training is WAY more extensive.

It's possible to do it safe, as you see elsewhere in the world. Don't wanna see moms in their SUVs do it, but when they get 4mpg @ 110mph, maybe that fad will finally end?

Anyway, it's very rare to get a stretch of highway (in Northern California at least) where I could really open up to around 120 or so. Used to hit 105 daily on my way to work, but only for a tiny stretch cresting a hill.

damn shame too, we got shit drivers here who get in accidents at 60mph anyway.  Sad

George



They're not handing trophies out today
User currently offlinePH-KCA From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1597 times:

In The Netherlands the common speed limits are 120 km/h and 100 km/h. Although sometimes I would like higher speeds to be legal, I don't think it's really necessary as The Netherlands are a small country. Because of this size the distance between two places in The Netherlands is no greater than some 400 km. Germany is many times larger and thus the distances are much larger. As I come in Germany almost yearly with vacation or just to shop, I think it's a blessing that at many Autobahns you may drive as fast as you want. Fi. the Autobahns around Köln/Cologne, Düsseldorf in the Ruhrgebiet are partly speed-limited and also busy, so it's safer to drive slower. But outside the Ruhrgebiet and large cities there is less traffic. Fi. between Nürnberg/ Neurenberg and München/Munich there's mostly less traffic so there you can drive faster. I usually drive some 150 km/h.

User currently offlineRacko From Germany, joined Nov 2001, 4856 posts, RR: 20
Reply 11, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1599 times:

I've once read that the average speed on the Autobahn is about 150km/h, but that includes trucks, caravans etc. aswell, which are allowed to do only 110km/h.

I regularly travel at the speeds around 160km/h, when the traffic allows it (Aloges, somehow we seem to know the same Fiat Punto driver  Smile/happy/getting dizzy) even more, and I feel comfortable. But it's a matter of getting used to it I think, if you're used to do a maximum of 110, directly starting with 200km/h once you pass the border probably isn't the best idea.

As Aloges pointed out, there are always some drawbacks, like the expensive driver's licenses. On the other hand, after I finished my driving exercise's, I immediately felt comfortable and wasn't nervous after all.



User currently offlineYKA From Netherlands, joined Sep 2001, 766 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1578 times:

Yep, gotta love germany for their autobahns. Its funny that owners euro cars with their "four banger" engines as americans dismisingly call them often drive faster than their american counterparts with their V8 monsters. Can't wait until im back in europe this summer.


(end of speed limit sign, a common sight on autobahns)


User currently offlineJetsetter From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1560 times:

Yeah, it's much different here in the States. There are places here in FL (alligator alley, and some other open roads) where the speed limit is 70 mph. On most interstates, it's been raised to 65 throughout the U.S.

However, more often than not, drivers either are not familiar with the "stay to the right" rule, or they purposely ignore it to infuriate drivers who want to go faster. I can't count how many times I've been in the left lane behind someone who deliberately slows down because they're "doing the speed limit," or just to annoy the driver who wants to go faster. This causes the driver to pass on the right, causing many accidents.

Here in South Florida it's awful. There's an HOV (High Occupancy Vehicle) lane for vehicles with two or more persons that is only in effect for those hours. Unfortunately, unlike the DC area, it's the left hand lane and it's not set apart by any barriers, so people think it's an HOV lane all day! It causes a huge number of accidents.

I've been to Europe many times, but have never really driven there on the highways. Do you have similar attitudes/phenomenon? If not, why is it so different here?


User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 14, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1560 times:

I went to Germany recently, and got a rental car. I headed out of the Frankfurt airport and got on what I thought to be the Autobahn. Well when I got on I was ticked off.... the road was only 2 lanes. There was no traffic. I decided I had better get off at the next exit and begin to asses my situation and how the hell I was going to find the Autobahn.

Well it wasn't 2 seconds later a Mercedes that was well into the tripple digits passed me.... I said " I guess Im on the AutoBahn". I had expected a much wider road with shoulders...... not the case.

If your an auto enthusiast like I am... the Autobahn is a must do item before you die.

Until my trip to Germany I believed Mercedes to be the wifes car of well to do families. Thats all that drives them in my area. They are for sure to be seen doing 50 in a 55 limit in the left lane.

Well.... thats one hell of a waste of a Benz.

JET


User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1556 times:

For instance in Portugal, the speed limit is 120 km/h, and anything 30 km/h over the limit is seen as a minor infraction.

What a coincidence. I know people who live there and they tell me the highways are deathtraps with lots of accidents.

I got the following information from http://www.frommers.com/destinations/portugal/0235030865.html


Continental driving rules apply in Portugal, and international road symbols and signs are used. Wearing safety belts is compulsory. Speed limits are 90 kilometers per hour (55 mph) on main roads, and 60 kmph (37 mph) in heavily populated or built-up sections. On the limited number of express highways, the speed limit is 120 kmph (75 mph).

There are few superhighways in Portugal, and they're often interrupted by lengthy stretches of traffic-clogged single-lane thoroughfares. The roads, however, provide access to hard-to-reach gems and undiscovered villages.




User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1555 times:

And this just in from http://travel.state.gov/portugal.html:

Portugal has one of the highest rates of automobile accidents and fatalities in Europe. Portuguese driving habits, high speeds, and poorly marked roads pose special hazards. In continental Portugal, fines for traffic violations are substantial and usually must be paid on the spot. Taxis are a reliable means of transportation, though travelers should pay attention to discrepancies between the meter fare and the amount requested by the driver. Buses are reliable and inexpensive.

In the Azores, driving can be treacherous due to narrow cobblestone streets, blind curves, unprotected embankments, herds of cows in the countryside roads, and the high speeds of other drivers. In contrast to the continent, traffic violations are registered by radar and later forwarded to the offender via the postal service - payments are not made on the spot. Taxis do not have meters. The fare consists of a base fee plus a posted rate per kilometer traveled. Public buses are inexpensive. Bus services begin at 7:00 a.m. and generally operate until 8:00 p.m. depending on the destination.


User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 56
Reply 17, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1552 times:

Airplay, I'm aware of the statistics regarding Portugal. Many factors, such as the ones you listed are responsible for the high death rates. However, the highways have low death rates. It's on secondary roads where you get all the problems. This goes to show you that proper highways can be safe, even at high speeds.


"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16228 posts, RR: 57
Reply 18, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1550 times:

driving can be treacherous due to...herds of cows in the countryside roads

hehehe.



Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineMx5_boy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1545 times:

YYz717,

Ever seen Koala, Kangaroo, Womabat or Moniter lizard roadkill?

Kanga's are the biggest threat to drivers in Australia, you can be tooling down an arterial road through the bush at 120km/h and a big eastern grey kanga jumps into your lane from the side of the road and your in trouble!

The damage they do! Most regular country drivers have roo bars installed on the front of their vehicles. Certainly the interstate busses and trucks have them.

mb

clowns=skid marks


User currently offlineHepkat From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 2341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1539 times:

I've been to Europe many times, but have never really driven there on the highways. Do you have similar attitudes/phenomenon? If not, why is it so different here?

In this part of Europe, Germany/Austria, drivers are disciplined almost to a fault. They keep religiously to the right at ALL TIMES, overtake only on the left and as a rule, driver VERY fast. My five years of living here suggests that the high driving speed mandates this level of discipline. Without it, there would be massive fatalities since people here are accustomed to driving between 130 to 220+ kph (80 to 130+ mph). In addition, it takes much more study and money to obtain a drivers license. You MUST attend a driving school and study for weeks (you have to know a wealth of details, everything from the inner workings of the car to mastering all the winter driving techniques), all of which cost a hefty $1500-2000.

I've been in NY over the past few days and never really realized how slow we drive in the U.S. I guess speed is relative. Before moving to Europe I used to think 65mph was a big deal but now it seems so slow and inefficient. And I have noticed that we don't seem to be anywhere as good or as disciplined drivers as the Europeans. Driving upstate last weekend, I saw people parked permanently in the left lane forcing others to pass them on the right. This is very dangerous, but why hadn't I noticed it before?

I went to Germany recently, and got a rental car. I headed out of the Frankfurt airport and got on what I thought to be the Autobahn. Well when I got on I was ticked off.... the road was only 2 lanes. There was no traffic. I decided I had better get off at the next exit and begin to asses my situation and how the hell I was going to find the Autobahn.

Well it wasn't 2 seconds later a Mercedes that was well into the tripple digits passed me.... I said " I guess Im on the AutoBahn". I had expected a much wider road with shoulders...... not the case.


I also had the same problem when I first came to Europe. I drove everywhere looking for the "Autobahn", not knowing that I was already driving on it. Perhaps this is a good time to inform all Americans, "Autobahn" is simply German for highway. It's not a special highway, just your ordinary stretch of road connecting cities where you're allowed to drive at high speeds. Most of the German Autobahn has no speed limit, however it's a common misconception that you're allowed to drive as fast as you like. As far as I know, you're allowed to drive as fast as you and the vehicle SAFELY can, therefore you can get into a lot of trouble if you cause an accident through your own negligence. In Austria, the speed limit's 130kph (80mph), but everyone usually does between 140-170kph (83-105mph). My comfort level is about 150-160kph (90-100mph).

Until my trip to Germany I believed Mercedes to be the wifes car of well to do families. Thats all that drives them in my area. They are for sure to be seen doing 50 in a 55 limit in the left lane.

Makes you wonder why Americans spend so much money buying those expensive BMWs and Audis when they're only allowed to drive them at 65mph. These machines where built to cheat death itself on the highway, their capabilities are wasted on American highways.


User currently offlineMSY-MSP From United States of America, joined Jun 2002, 151 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1526 times:

I have to admit that I really love driving on the Autobahn. I have driven on the Autobahn a number of times. A couple of times with my own car, and a couple of times with rentals or friends cars. Just a couple of stories.

In 1997, I had my new car, a Volvo S70-T5, and had just crossed into Germany from Denmark, and was doing 120km/h (still in the break in period, and yes I was in the RIGHT lane). Suddenly out of nowhere, came a Porsche 911 doing well over 240km/h. My friend in the pax seat, who had never been to Germany, and only driven on Canadian, US highways, had his jaw in his lap. He didn't believe that you could actually drive that fast on a road. Later after the break in period and driving from the Austrian border to Munich Had the car well over 220km/h (130MPH), and it was a blast.

Another trip was in an A class. It was what an American would consider underpowered, but it could move on the road. Had no trouble going 160km/h or more. Made many of the American cars here seem worthless, and not very high performance.

The main thing that I noticed is that Europeans and Germans actually understand and adhere to the concept of Lane Control. Keep right except to pass. (We actually have signs posted to remind people of this) If Americans were able to adhere to this then we might be able to have unlimited speed. Of course Montana had that for a while, and it was fun, while it lasted. Got one of my only tickets during this time. 105 MPH Ticket, cost $20. To bad it is gone now.

MSY-MSP



User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 56
Reply 22, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1520 times:

Problem with lane discipline in North America is the result of not only poor driver training, which should cement this concept into student's brains, but also law enforcement. As long as police forces only give tickets to speeders and nothing else, nothing will change. It's really a shame that somebody going 20 over the limit is given a ticket, while so many other, more dangerous acts are completely let off. Thing is, catching speeders is easy. Radars don't lie, and it's a black and white thing, you're either speeding or you're not. With other offenses, it's not as easy to convict.


"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineMhsieh From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1511 times:

Among the 3 German brands, M-B, Audi, BMW, which one is most highly regaded in Germany?
Are SUVs popular in Germany?


User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 24, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 1513 times:

In the Netherlands, driving (and especially on the highways) is a constant battle.
Most drivers are very agressive and won't let anyone change lanes ending up in front of themselves.
This is a major cause of traffic jams, as cars stack up on the entry lanes and try to force themselves into traffic.
Add the people going 70kmh in the left lane where 120 is allowed (and many people will do 130-140+) and you have the making of traffic jams and accidents.

Driving in Germany is always a relief.



I wish I were flying
25 Eg777er : Ahhh....Portugeuse roads. When we lived there, my father had to drive to and from work in Lisbon from home in Cascais along the "Marginal", a 4-lane r
26 Sccutler : I Can't drive Fifty-five (so went the song). I can't drive 65 or 70, either, but find that under appropriate traffic conditions, and with the use of m
27 L-188 : The closest that I have ever come to getting killed in a MVA was on the Autobahn. We had a Duece and Half on a hill outside Stuttgart cranked up to 60
28 Mls515 : My fellow American drivers just SUCK! I actually have to pass other cars on two-lane highways in the 45 foot monsters I've been driving around lately
29 VonRichtofen : "I wish speed limits would increase in North America" Are you sure? Imagine all the soccer moms at the wheel of a Yukon or Excursion doing 140..... sc
30 Post contains images CPH-R : The only part of 'der Autobahn' I don't like, is the parts that were made in former Eastern Germany and haven't been repaired. At the worst parts, it
31 Post contains images Dufo : Fun fun fun on the Autobahn indeed, CPH-R Oh yes.. I remember one ride with a Lotus Omega as a passenger, doing 280km/h (150km/h above the local limit
32 Petertenthije : my understanding is that the coaches in Europe are governed at 100 kph (62 mph). Is that true? Shame if it is. The coaches over there also have this p
33 Post contains images Andreas : Jwenting: Driving in Germany is always a relief. ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That coming from a Dutch, I have to tell you: But not for the Germans. (Sor
34 Racko : Actually, the Autobahnen (-s? How do you handle Plural with Foreign words in English? Anyway..) are a very safe place to travel, the fatality rates in
35 Rabenschlag : for all of you who are afraid of old ladies in fast cars: my mom is used to drive big BMW's since she was 40 or so, and she was never afraid to test t
36 Staffan : I was always told flashing the lights in Germany was forbidden? It's a bit scary though when you drive down the left lane at 200+ and a truck pulls ou
37 Hepkat : I have heard that in France it is not even allowed to drive lorries on Sundays due to the strict labour unions. Is this true? What happens if a foreig
38 Hepkat : now that she is close to her 70's, she still drives a BMW 750i. and guess what, she does not hestitat to go 200 kmh if there's not too much trafic. Be
39 Andreas : Flashing one's headlights is forbidden in Germany except in conditions of upcoming danger! The wish to overtake is none such condition *ggg* The same
40 Aloges : On Sundays, only those lorries carrying perishable goods are allowed to use the Autobahn. It makes driving a lot more pleasant and gives you a safer f
41 Rabenschlag : i can only speak for myself but i cannot imagine *any* circumstances under which i would enjoy being sandwiched
42 Post contains images ADG : Mx5, I'd say the wombat was the biggest threat on the road in Aus .. they're like a hairy rock when you hit them .. and a low slung car v wombat is a
43 Post contains images Airsicknessbag : What a nice thread that spang up out of nowhere last n<script src="http://www.burstnet.com/cgi-bin/ads/ad2130a.cgi/sz=0X0MN/3833/RETURN-CODE/JS/">&
44 Erj190 : € 1700, for a driving license ? In Portugal it will cost something around € 650, and I think that is expensive.
45 Post contains images CPH-R : Daniel, I remember driving from Salzburg towards Munich, and at one point it just became insane. It went on for like 5 minutes, before the bumps ended
46 Staffan : I have always wondered why Germany doesn't impose a fee for foreign cars that use the autobahn. The French system with toll booths is a drag, but a st
47 Racko : Because the EU prohibits to charge only foreign cars, and a general fee also for German drivers isn't politically possible in Germany.
48 Covert : Goodness, why does America have to be like that? Broke suburban police departments with 2 cars and six officers on the force that have nothing better
49 CPH-R : Yeah - it should be valid in most countries. Though I'd advise you to keep the foot light on the pedal in the beginning. .. oh, and am I the only pers
50 Racko : "My drivers test was easy as hell, made me parallel park and took me around the block. cost me like 40 bucks and that includes the motorcycle permit t
51 Post contains images Stratofish : ".. oh, and am I the only person who loves driving through the Kassel Hills/Mountains?" Sure not... although it highly depends on what kind of car you
52 Post contains links Covert : No, I just have a motorcycle learners permit which expired on friday the 4th by the way, will cost $5 to renew. I have to be "under the supervision" o
53 PH-KCA : About those light-flashers or "bumperklevers" (bumper-stickers): I mostly experience this in The Netherlands. On the Dutch "Autosnelweg" I usually dri
54 Post contains images Aloges : ".. oh, and am I the only person who loves driving through the Kassel Hills/Mountains?" In the right car, nothing is better than those hills! "You're
55 Staffan : Göttingen.. isn't that where the model railway museum is? Staffan
56 Post contains links Racko : That's Göppingen, the home of the famous model railway maker märklin.
57 Post contains images Staffan : Ok, almost Staffan
58 Jetsetter : Interesting how there's such a difference between driving in the Netherlands and driving in Germany. What about France? What are the driving laws like
59 MD-90 : Wow, mine was only $32 for the license. I did have to pay ~ $50 or so for driver's ed because I took it during summer school instead of when school wa
60 Covert : By the way, is insurance expensive in Europe too? I'm 18 and pay $2200 every year just for liability.... covert
61 Racko : Insurance prives highly depend on the type of car you drive, your age, and your time of accident-free driving.
62 N312RC : Here in Michigan, our speed limits are set at 70MPH on all freeways (except maybe a few like M-39 because its sunken and there is visual distortion).
63 Post contains images GunFighter 6 : First of all i would never get in a car that is driven by an american on the German Autobahn. shute that will definately kill us all. Reason: Poor dri
64 L-188 : GunFighter 6. I own a Chevy Cavalier. I don't think you can get a V-8 under the hood of the thing. Mine is a four banger and I definately would feel s
65 Post contains images GunFighter 6 : well I agree, but the comparison was between a V40 and a Cavalier would be nice however to see a v8 in a cavalier.. drove one myself in the years i li
66 Post contains images Andreas : Just one hint on how to handle flashers on the left lane: Put a little button in the cockpit and connect it to the reverse-gear lights, and when someo
67 9V-SPF : I just love driving along the A3 from Frankfurt to Cologne on the left lane at speeds around 200km/h (have to take my daddy´s car for that as my Polo
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