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Why In Aviation People Use Imperial System?  
User currently offlineF.pier From Italy, joined Aug 2000, 1523 posts, RR: 9
Posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2279 times:

There is an International System which IS the metric.

I can't understand why, a system which is not scientifically accepted, should be always used in aviation.

Scientists decided that the metric system IS THE system, so we should use it always.





14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2261 times:

The metric system is a product of the devil  Acting devilish

Tradition mostly.

That and most certified aircraft fasteners are standard.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2263 times:

Scientists decided that the metric system IS THE system, so we should use it always.

Huh? Which scientists? Metric may be easier to understand to the layman, but Imperial measures are just as valid scientifically as any other.

As L-188 said, tradition is a large part of it. Imperial measures have been around a whole lot longer than Metric. Also, it is largely the Americans and the British that developed wide-scale international air travel, so they were the first to make the rules.

Some Americans here might remember that there was a big, expensive effort in the 70's and 80's to switch the U.S. to the Metric system, but people were not convinced, and the effort died out.

Charles

[Edited 2003-08-15 11:23:46]

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 3, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2254 times:

Actually some of my tax money still goes to a government office who's job it is to promote the metric system in the US.

All I know is that on my 81 Ford P/U. The engine, which was made in the use is standard and the body panel bolts are all metric.  Nuts

Actually it ticked me off that I had to buy two sets of wrenchs for the thing. I think the metric system in the US was just conceived by toolmakers to sell more wrenches.  Pissed



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineWoodreau From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1025 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2230 times:

Well actually ICAO is the organization which publishes an international recommended standard units of measure for aviation. But each country's aviation authority specifies what units will be used in that particular country.

The different units of measure between each country can be found in each country's AIP.




Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
User currently offlineLstc From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 320 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2201 times:

Imperial? A US gallon is an "imperial" measure? I don't think so...

By the way, as mentioned, imperial measure IS NOT the international aviation standard.


User currently offlineSccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5491 posts, RR: 28
Reply 6, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2200 times:

Actually, the knot (nautical mile) has independent significance, and is not random.

Nautical miles measure distance. 1 nautical mile is the angular distance of 1 minute of arc on the earth's surface. As these differ slightly (6108' at pole c.f. 6046' at equator) 6080 was adopted (this being it's approximate value in the English Channel). The International nautical mile is 1852 metres, so is very slightly different from the UK nautical mile.


1 UK nautical mile = 1.00064 international nautical miles

You should expect to continue to use knots for a good long time.

As for other measures, I wish the metric conversion had happened in the early 70's, as we were taught and expected it would when I was in elementary school in teh 60s.



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2185 times:

metric is not the work of the devil. it's the easiest thing to remember! i wish aviation used it, i hate trying to remember how man feet in a mile etc...  Pissed


"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8504 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2168 times:

Aviation uses the American system, not the Imperial.

And didn't Airbus use the American system, because it was "more accurate?"  Big grin

joke folks, joke.

5280 feet in a mile, Cancidas.


User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 34
Reply 9, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2178 times:


It´s all the Stonecutters´ fault:

"Who keeps the metric system down - we do, we do!" Big grin Big grin

Daniel Smile


User currently offlineBOAC From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (10 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2126 times:

Why do the airlines measure fuel in pounds but luggage in kilogrammes

User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13170 posts, RR: 77
Reply 11, posted (10 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2111 times:

Bet NASA wished they'd standardized on either system after that Mars probe in 1999 was lost.
The world IS going metric, slowly.
I was only taught metric at school in the 70's.
As a young child I can remember old age pensioners ('seniors' in the US) moaning about the UK switch to a decimal money system, which happened in 1971.
"I can't understand it" was the mantra. Yeah right, sharp enough with figures when your playing bingo aren't you?
Amazingly, you get a few no-life types in the UK still refusing to use metric, I mean we've only been trying to convert to it since the early 19th century after all!
And what about all us who've been educated in metric, which must have been going on for 30+ years now.


User currently offlineTeva From France, joined Jan 2001, 1871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 12, posted (10 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2106 times:

To keep it simple....
Quantities of hazardous material on board a flt must be in Kilos, as per IATA and ICAO regulations.
That means that in the US, aviation professionals have to play with the 2 systems.
In Europe, it is the same. On weight and balance, weights will be in kilos. But ATC will talk in feet...

L-188, I am sorry, but the metric system is not the creation of the devil. It has been given to the world by the French revolution... Or maybe Frenchies are evil.... Vade retro satanas...  Big thumbs up

Teva  Innocent



Ecoute les orgues, Elles jouent pour toi...C'est le requiem pour un con
User currently offlineRyu2 From Taiwan, joined Aug 2002, 490 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 2094 times:

Actually, China, Russia, and other former Eastern Bloc countries do use the metric system, for altitudes, speeds, etc. But the more advanced West doesn't?  Confused

User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8504 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (10 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 2089 times:

Don't forget that the majority of the world's aircraft come from the United States. It ain't just Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell Douglas, it's also Cessna, Piper, Beech, Lancair, Cirrus, Van's, Rutan, etc.

The only other really historically big producer of aircraft was the USSR, which is now dissolved. And of course there's today's Airbus, but what about the little (numerous) planes? Aside from micolights, there aren't that many Socatas, Grobs, Zlins, etc out there.


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