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The Real Gray Davis Record  
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2468 times:

The Record of Gray Davis
by Howard Blume

The survival of Governor Gray Davis will depend on the willingness of progressives — Democrat and otherwise — to vote against the October 7 recall and mobilize others to do the same. This reality is not lost on Davis, who last month performed an about-face on one issue important to many Latinos and liberals. He suddenly asserted that he would sign a bill permitting undocumented immigrants to obtain a driver’s license — only months after opposing such a bill.

This apparent pandering for votes — and Davis’ notorious and incessant huckstering for campaign dollars — is precisely what turned many lefties against him, while also providing fodder for his conservative opponents. But behind everything people dislike about Davis, there’s still a record that, in the view of many, deserves careful review and some respect. To look at that record in detail, from a progressive standpoint, the Weekly interviewed experts, lobbyists and activists. The ratings below on a range of issues are based on this input.

Criminal Justice

The Record: Poor


The support of one union has added no luster to Davis’ progressive credentials. Members of the California Correctional Peace Officers Association enjoyed a 7 percent pay raise this year in the midst of a budget crisis. It was just the latest in a series of extraordinarily good years under this governor.

“The governor’s romance with the correctional officers has been a problem throughout his administration,” said Gerald F. Uelmen, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. “This has played out in the form of a huge financial burden of building and staffing more and more prisons. And when we tried to change the direction of the criminal-justice system with Proposition 36, Davis didn’t support it.” Voter-approved Prop. 36 allows for the diversion of drug offenders from incarceration to treatment facilities. Despite the program’s promise, said Uelmen, Davis has made no effort to expand drug treatment. “Even a Republican conservative could see the tremendous costs savings of getting people into rehabilitation and out of prison. I don’t see that as a liberal or conservative issue, but a question of economic good sense.”

And “outrageous” is the word Uelmen used to describe Davis’ blanket position against parole for anyone convicted of murder. “Davis ran as a hard-liner on crime, so it’s not as though he’s pulled a fast one on us,” said Uelmen. “On the other hand, he’s carried that into so many arenas.” Davis, for example, blocked statewide rules for enforcing Proposition 215, which legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes. The result is patchwork compliance. Having as many as 99 marijuana plants is legal in Mendocino, but three is the limit in Tuolomne County.

On the positive side, said Uelmen, Davis has filled judicial vacancies with “excellent, highly qualified” appointments while diversifying the bench with more women and minorities.

Education

The Record: Good


Virtually no one agrees on what true reform in education ought to be, but Davis has indeed focused on his brand of reform. “Gray Davis said that education would be his number-one priority, and it actually has been,” said Barbara Kerr, president of the California Teachers Association. Actually, Davis said education would be his first, second and third priorities, but, redundant ordinals aside, Kerr credits Davis in particular for pouring more money into education in good times and maintaining smaller class sizes and limiting the overall damage during the current crisis. Kerr doesn’t hold with Davis’ emphasis on standardized testing, but even that stance, she noted, underscores Davis’ focus on education.

Davis has assertively opposed using taxpayer-financed vouchers to send children to private schools. He’s generally supported charter schools while also backing legislation to rein them in.

Overall, on education, said Kerr, “Gray has kept his word.”

Environment

The Record: Good


Environmentalists are grateful for Davis’ support of bond measures to purchase sensitive parklands. And California’s bill to limit greenhouse-gas emissions in automobiles, signed last year, is so trendsetting that much of the industry has mobilized against it. Davis also signed legislation that requires private energy companies to produce an increasing proportion of clean, renewable energy — such as wind or solar power. Energy companies must achieve 20 percent renewable power by 2017.

In addition, Davis has called for legislation to accelerate the recycling of electronic components. A recycling program is needed because plastics in used computers and TVs don’t break down in landfills, and they also leach hazardous chemicals into the environment. The cathode-ray tubes of monitors, for example, contain potentially dangerous amounts of lead, to name just one toxin. ‰

The governor also supported a Sheila Kuehl–authored bill requiring an identified water source before major residential development can go forward. And the Davis administration has protected the coast against both offshore oil drilling and overdevelopment. His appointments to the Coastal Commission are significantly more eco-friendly than those of his Republican predecessors. And last week, he signed a first-in-the-nation ban on a toxic flame retardant found in the finishes of household furniture that can accumulate in mothers and nursing babies.

The downside, said Bill Magavern, a Sierra Club lobbyist, includes his administration’s negotiating of long-term energy contracts that rely almost exclusively on non-renewable forms of energy. Magavern also faults Davis for deregulating the disposal of radioactive waste from decommissioned research facilities, such as the Santa Susana site once used by Rocketdyne. And Davis vetoed legislation that would have banned low-level radioactive waste from standard landfills, which are typically ill-prepared, he said, to deal with the material. Davis also has given in too often, he added, to logging interests eager to clear-cut old timber, and to agribusiness, which has resisted pesticide restrictions. Both industries number among Davis’ campaign contributors.

On balance, however, “California has the best environmental laws in the country,” said Magavern. “Unquestionably the best on global warming and clean air. Near the top in clean water, hazardous waste and toxics. Davis would be up there among the best governors in the country on environmental issues.”

Gay Rights

The Record: Very Good


Like every God- and pollster-fearing politician, Davis opposes calling it “marriage” when two men or two women make a long-term commitment to one another. But he’s at least considering the civil-union bill, sponsored by Jackie Goldberg, which would provide everything the state could offer but the M word. ‰

Never expect Davis to carry a purple banner at a gay-pride parade, but he’s signed real advances into law, such as stronger provisions for reporting and prosecuting hate crimes. He also expanded Medi-Cal coverage to include non-disabled people who test positive for the HIV virus but do not have full-blown AIDS. Another new law permits domestic partners to inherit their partner’s property without a will.

Davis also has appointed nine openly gay or lesbian judges. “During the Deukmejian and Wilson administrations, no gay or lesbian judges were put on the bench, while Jerry Brown appointed one,” said Eric Bauman, an L.A.-based Davis staffer who took a leave to campaign against the recall.

Davis gets top marks from openly gay state Assembly Member Mark Leno (D–San Francisco). “There has been no governor in the history of this state who has done anywhere as much as Governor Davis” for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Health Care

The Record: Improvements at the Margins


Much like the state budget, the health-care system itself is broken. For starters, 7 million Californians lack health insurance, and 80 percent of those are working people and their families. Many advocates assert that bold, unconventional solutions are called for, like a Canadian-style, single-payer system of universal, government-funded health insurance. Davis is never likely to be so daring. But advocates credit Davis with measurable progress at the margins.

“Gray Davis has improved the system both for consumers and for those who work in the system,” said Beth Capell, a lobbyist for Health Access, a nonprofit coalition that advocates for quality, affordable health care.

First and foremost, Davis signed a raft of HMO reform bills in 1999 that give Californians rights that industry lobbyists have successfully fended off at the federal level. Californians, for example, can sue their HMO, and they also can appeal medical decisions to an independent physicians panel. Davis also has expanded the Healthy Families program, which covers the children of the poor and also would serve their parents, if it is fully funded.

Also on Davis’ watch, California has mandated increased staffing in nursing homes and become the first state to establish nursing ratios in hospitals. “We assume when we go to the hospital that it’s safe,” said Capell, “and it hasn’t necessarily been true. The Davis administration has helped to change that.”

The Davis administration also agreed to budget funds that have lifted the average wage of nursing-home workers, who do most of the hands-on care in nursing homes, from about $7 an hour to more than $9 an hour in L.A. County.

The changes fall well short of revolution. And some advocates have complained that the Davis administration has saved dollars by limiting access to health programs.

If Davis survives the recall, he could have the chance to make health-care history by signing pending legislation mandating that employees provide health-care coverage. But that may be tweaking his centrism too far.

Housing and the Homeless

The Record: Some Progress


Davis supported last year’s Proposition 46, which funds both homeless shelters and the construction of affordable housing. Davis also has signed legislation strengthening tenants’ rights. In 1999, a more prosperous time, Davis more than doubled the state’s housing budget. The problem is that such efforts have fallen well short of the need, which requires something like a statewide housing trust fund paid for with ongoing, vastly increased revenue, said Jan Breidenbach, executive director of the Southern California Association of Non-Profit Housing.



Labor/Workplace Issues

The Record: Very Good


Davis’ record here includes reinstating overtime for the eight-hour workday, signing a family medical-leave bill, raising the minimum wage, and extending unemployment insurance and increasing the payments. He also signed legislation providing tax credits for the construction of housing for farm workers and increased funding for the agency that oversees workplace safety.

It’s not that Davis has led the charge on any of these (or on anything else), but quite often, when progressive legislation is put before him, he signs it. In a state with a Legislature that is frequently pushing a labor agenda, Davis’ more passive role is nonetheless crucial, and labor knows it, which is why organized labor intends to mount a massive campaign to keep Davis in office. Its leaders also hope to extract policy concessions from Davis. It remains to be seen, however, whether the union leadership can motivate its members to stand for the governor.

Women’s Reproductive Rights

The Record: Excellent


No mixed emotions on this one for Gayle Tiller of Planned Parenthood. She’s unabashedly pro-Davis. “He gets an A+ on reproductive-health issues,” said Tiller, public-affairs director for the nation’s largest Planned Parenthood affiliate, headquartered in San Jose. During the Davis tenure, California passed legislation affirming abortion rights, which could stand as the law of the land if the closely divided Supreme Court backtracks on Roe v. Wade. Davis also signed laws that allow pharmacists to provide emergency contraceptive medicine without a prescription, that mandate hospitals to offer emergency contraception for rape survivors, and that require medical-residency programs to include training on abortions.

========================================================

Over all, not a bad Governor but not the greatest. He is faceing a tough economy as all other 49 governors. I still don't think a recall is waranted.


Bring back the Concorde
27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDeltaSFO From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2488 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2379 times:

Corrupt as hell. Plus, he rooted for the Angels in the World Series last year.

No way he gets my vote.



It's a new day. Every moment matters. Now, more than ever.
User currently offlineJohnboy From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 2597 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2378 times:

I don't see enough of a smoking gun to warrant a recall either.

My vote goes to no recall and Cruz Bustamante. I'm 40 years old and never voted for a Republican. Can't find a good reason to start now.

Make that ESPECIALLY now.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 3, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2367 times:

Grey Davis rooted for the Angels?
I well then he's OUT!

Just kidding! Big grin



Johnboy:
I agree. I will vote the same.




Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8508 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2343 times:

So, gay rights and women's reproductive rights are the means that we measure a governor? Not in Alabama, I can assure you.

How a bout the fact that California is facing a massive debt crisis of epic proportions, businesses are fleeing the state, and immigrants continue to come in and drain the "system" of benefits (and the state of money)?

I don't think he needs to be recalled. Let the Californians who voted him into office for a second term suffer. I don't care. Not unless it seriously starts affecting the national economy or Davis asks for a bailout. I don't want to send any of my family's tax dollars to such a corrupt state.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 5, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2335 times:

MD-90:
I don't want to send any of my family's tax dollars to such a corrupt state.


So are you saying that block grants should be withheld from California because our values and policies differ from 'Bama's?  Confused



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8508 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2316 times:

California can deal with its mess that it created. I'm don't want to help bail them out for something that is there own fault. I'm all for compassion but they've gone too far.

User currently offlineLindy field From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 3129 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2307 times:
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He's been a disappointing governor and clearly lacks crisis management skills (I recognize that these crises are not necessarily of his making). Still, the last thing that California needs is this recall effort, which is only destabilizing the state political system. A successful recall will only legitimize this sort of political tactic and will further polarize the parties.

I'll vote against the recall and for Bustamante.


User currently offlineBoeing4ever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2306 times:

So are you saying that block grants should be withheld from California because our values and policies differ from 'Bama's?

Actually, this touches on a question many Americans now have on their minds:

WHY THE HELL SHOULD WE ALL SUFFER BECAUSE OF CALIFORNIA'S STUPIDY!?

B4e-Forever New Frontiers


User currently offlineDonder10 From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 6660 posts, RR: 21
Reply 9, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 2302 times:

Has Arnie displayed any policy aims yet?What has he said about reducing the state deficit?

User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 10, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2286 times:

Thanks for the replies. Perhaps I can help explain the confusion more clearly.

I agree about how California voters are partially to blame for creating this mess.

The voters have approved some very costly initiatives that the State can't afford just to express there anger. Prop. 13 (passed in 1978) which kept property taxes low is a loss in potiential revenue to the state.
The three strikes law, mandatory minimums and other initiatives passed that incarcerates thousands of non-violent criminals for long terms cost money. Lost of money!
All of these costly initiatives were Republican sponsored.
Then we have Arnold Swartzineggar's after school progam for the children cost taxpayers money as well. It's no wonder he has been very vauge about his economic plan. His own advisor (Warren Buffet) said that property taxes in California are too low. Buffet pointed out that his property in California has a lower tax than in his conservative home state of Nebraska.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineNorth County From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 712 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2279 times:

Well 58% of those polled in California would vote against Davis on 10/07.


And Bustamante just came out and proposed 8 Billion in new taxes. He called it tough love. Sorry but tough love is the idea that you have to discipline or correct those who have made mistakes in the past.

Prop 13 just limits the amounts of increase in property taxes one pay - It limits the amount of value increase to 1% or 2% a year - that is fair. When one buys a home the base value is the purchase price and they can count on fair and manageable property taxes in the future.

Word to Superfly.... Cut the budget. Very simple and very easy solution.

Since Davis took office as Governor 5 years ago the rate of population coupled with inflation has been 10-15%, revenue has gone up 25% but the spending has gone up over 40%.

Cut the budget.

Arnold's after school program can only be put into place if there is not a budget problem. It has not cost the state a dime so far... Image that a program that would only go into effect if you had the money to fund it.....

The people of California did not cause the budget problem - it was the democratic controlled assembly, state senate and democratic Governor.


The voters are going to vote some "tough love" on the democrats.

Looks like Arnold has a very good chance of winning it all....

Finally some good news!

[Edited 2003-08-22 21:00:09]

User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 12, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2251 times:

North County:
Word to Superfly.... Cut the budget. Very simple and very easy solution.

I wholeheartedly agree and spending has been cut. Have you seen the amount of teachers laid off? Have you seen the amount of courses cut at universities?

Well 58% of those polled in California would vote against Davis on 10/07.

...and many of that 58% is Democrats and Greens who also support removing Grey Davis.

The voters are going to vote some "tough love" on the democrats.

Looks like Arnold has a very good chance of winning it all....


Don't get too excited. It looks like tough love to Grey Davis. Cruz Bustamante now leads the pack, not T2.



I totally support cutting spend on services that aren't needed. The problem is many politicians in the 1990s were pounding there chest about being 'tough on crime'. Now we've ended up with a huge prison budget with new prisons still being build. We have more non-violent adults locked up here in California than the entire population of Rhode Island and Delaware combined.
We have more state prisons than state universities. I have a hard time believing that there are over 2 million murdurers, armed robbers, rapist and child molesters in California. The bulk of the prison population is non-violent drug offenders.
Too many politicians wanted to talk tough on crime yet never took in to account the cost of 'setting an example' of dealing with drug offenders.

See 1st point in heading of this post on prisons.
As teachers who are educating our children are being laid off, prison guards are geting pay increases.
Grey Davis's overly cautious yet bi-partisian nature should have stood up to the prison lobby.


Grey Davis should have done something similar to what fmr. Illinois governor George Ryan (Republican) had done. Release all non-violent drug offenders from prison. Leave the prisons for the murdurers, armed robbers, rapist and child molesters






Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineNorth County From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 712 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2250 times:


Ok Superfly - in a prior post you blamed the voters for approving the bond issues.

Who do you feel is to blame for the budget mess?

Arnold has come out leading all others except in one poll so far...
and that was before Bustamante spelled out his planed 8 BILLION in new tax increases in the "tough love" speech.

Arnold could win, especially if a few of the top 3 republicans drop out.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 14, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2248 times:

North County:
Well the GOvernor could use his executive powers and over-ride the bond measures that the voters approved just like he did with Prop. 215 which dosen't cost a dime .

Every politician in California knows that messing with Prop. 13 would end there career in politics.
I wouldn't get too crazy about T2 yet. How did his numbers drop 30 points in 5 days?



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineNorth County From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 712 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2244 times:



30 points in five days - sounds like Arnold will come down to the less then 5% in a week....

Almost as bad as Davis coming down from 70% approval to less then 25% approval in 2 years.

I am interested in you outlook on:

Since Davis took office as Governor 5 years ago the rate of population coupled with inflation has been 10-15%, revenue has gone up 25% but the spending has gone up over 40%.

.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 16, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2242 times:

North County:
Sounds like me and you agree on this. Spending needs to be cut.
Prisons ain't cheap to run and operate. Why on earth did those damn prison guards get pay raises?

If Davis could over-ride Prop. 215 which dosen't cost a dime , why couldn't he over-ride these expensive 'tough on crime' bond measures that is draining our resources?

I am no fan of Davis either but I will vote NO on the recall because none of the 135 candidates are better. I think Cruz Bustamante will be a good replacement.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2237 times:

Anyone notice that the thread starter mentions Davis' record on small things like gay rights, and women's reproductive rights, but not one word on the real issues a govorner should be dealing with - like fiscal policy and control, infrastructure maintainance and development, etc? Why is that, I wonder...

Charles


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29813 posts, RR: 58
Reply 18, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 2232 times:

I picked up on that too.

How many billion where in the bank when Davis took over?

How many billion are they in the hole now that Davis is running things?



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 19, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2225 times:

As I mentioned above, EVER state had a surplus 5 years ago.
No one is coming up with a better solution. Arnold Swartzineggar hasn't given any specifics on his agenda. I seriously doubt he will be any more effective than Grey Davis.
The Republican thing to do during financial crisis is stirr up social issues to distract voters from there inability to govern properly.


If you look at the 1st. point in the topic, he gets a poor rating in dealing with crime. The prison spending is what's mainly draining the states resources. It's also hurt him politicaly with liberals here and that's why many liberals are supporting his recall.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8508 posts, RR: 12
Reply 20, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2218 times:

No, the main thing draining California's resources are all the US Californian taxpayers' dollars spent on socialist programs like welfare and Medicare.

User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 21, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2189 times:

MD-90:
You don't know a damn thing about California's budget.
Every state has welfare and medicare.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 22, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 2187 times:

More good news on the recall front. The latest poll shows support for recall slipping. As of Friday August 22nd, 50% support recall and 45% are against. Just last week support for the recall was 61% support for recall and 29% against. It appears that Gray Davis has momentum. Also Cruz Bustamante is leading the pack as a replacement IF Grey Davis goes down. Even after Bill Simon dropped out of the race, Cruz Bustamante was 17 points ahead of Arnold Swartzeneggar. It looks as those Arnold Swartzeneggar is falling in to the level of Gary Coleman, Larry Flynt, Gallagher and Mary Carey.

It looks as though the governors office will stay in the Democrat's hands.  Smile



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineJamesag96 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 2095 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 2174 times:

"It looks as though the governors office will stay in the Democrat's hands. "

And that is what it is all about right? Staying in a Democrats hands.....the man obviously hasn't done a good job, and by your numbers even today 1 in 2 people want him gone. But as long as a democrat stays in power things will work themselves out. Give me a break.

And before you get all high and mighty and go ballistic, I don't care who runs California, Dem., Rep, or otherwise, but the people of California should have enough brains to take it beyond a simple D vs. R issue. By saying that you sound like all of the other goof asses that claim as long as it is in Elephant hands it will be better.

How about some new ideas from different people, I haven't heard an idea one from Arnold, and it doesn't seem like any of Davis' have worked thus far. I would think, and hope the people of California stick it to all of their current politicians that have run them aground, and start over.

Seriously, how would you fix California?

J



Why Kate, You're not wearing a bustle. How lewd.
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 40036 posts, RR: 74
Reply 24, posted (11 years 3 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 2169 times:

Jamesag96:
Seriously, how would you fix California?

For the millionth time, I already pointed out the biggest wasteful spending program in California.  Insane

Just scroll up and read yourself.




Bring back the Concorde
25 Jamesag96 : O.K. as I tuck my tail between my legs.... I think you have some good ideas...why isn't your name on that ballot? Do you honestly, and I am not trying
26 Superfly : Jamesag96: I certainly am not a big fan of Gray Davis. I think he sucks. However, the proponets of the recall suck harder. That's why I am voting to k
27 Jamesag96 : Double post sorry. J[Edited 2003-08-25 23:32:24]
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