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The Children Who Won't Grow Up  
User currently offlineTeahan From Belgium, joined Nov 1999, 5287 posts, RR: 62
Posted (10 years 6 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1375 times:

Though slightly outdated, a very relevant and well written article about this growing trend in society:

http://www.spiked-online.com/Articles/00000006DE8D.htm

(bad link fixed)

Jeremiah

[Edited 2003-10-18 21:02:03]


Goodbye SR-LX MD-11 / 6th of March 1991 to the 31st of October 2004
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBigphilnyc From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 4076 posts, RR: 54
Reply 1, posted (10 years 6 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1371 times:

Bad link.



Philler.



Phil Derner Jr.
User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 6 months 5 days ago) and read 1337 times:

Well, only read about 4 paragraphs into it, but here are my thoughts...

I don't see anything wrong at all with this. Most childhood toys/tv shows/etc are designed to be slightly mentally stimulating, simple, clean, and all out, fun. Society has so many stress-causing things in it, then how else best to calm down by watching/doing something that just relaxes you, you enjoy, and doesn't hurt anybody.

Maybe its more of a question of why we're forcing the inner-child in all of us to no longer exist, when it should be there and thrive. These people are the ones who didn't give in, still have it, and are probably much more happier people for it.


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1309 times:

An excellent article that I can identify with completely. It is a pet peeve of mine to see supposed adults in Western society (and yes, it is largely a Western phenomenon) engaging in pursuits targeted towards those much younger than themselves.

What is even more amazing is that those folks think that I am the weird one because I don't even know what "Spongebob" is (I know its some kind of TV show 'cos I sometimes hear the annoying theme music when surfing channels) and that I stopped buying McDonalds Happy Meals almost 20 years ago.

Maybe its just me, but I find that "adult" pursuits (eg. TV shows without animation, table service versus fast food, etc..) are far more fulfilling and entertaining. I'm not averse to an occasional revisiting of the past (heck, I have enough relatives/friends with kids to ensure I have my fair share of babysitting duties and kiddie birthday parties to attend) but when the exception becomes the rule, it is very disturbing to me.


User currently offlineVaporlock From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1287 times:

My personal opinion is that children in the Westernworld are pushed way too fast & hard and never get to be kids. Whatever happened to children using their minds to be creative with crayons, playdoh and paper? Or enjoying playing outside or going on camping trips with their parents?

I realize that in most cases both parents have to work, when my kids were young it was the same for me but I made sure that I took the time with my kids and taught them about nature and how to have fun without having to sit in front of a TV watching movies, or in front of a computer playing games. They learned while they were entertaining themselves --- and thank me for it now. My youngest son played Major hockey for the Toronto Marlies for 6 years and then moved on to Junior "A" and trust me his schedule was hectic but we all worked around it.

I wonder sometimes when I read about problems that kids have these days and I guess the most important thing for me to remember is that it is not how much $$ we spend on our kids, it is the quality time we spend with them.

Phyllis  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineAloha717200 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 4429 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1260 times:

I also didn't read the entire article, but I did read a good deal of it.


While this guy describes some pretty extreme cases (21 year olds watching teletubbies is extreme I'd say), I think it's important not to take life so seriously that you can't retain at least part of your childhood innocence.


If you take joy in something, such as a TV show that other adults might consider below their age level, you should allow it to still bring you joy.


We are all so busy trying to be better than everyone else that we can't listen to our own hearts sometimes. How often do you hear that someone who likes animated cartoons, and happens to be an adult, is "immature". Some people go farther, making claims on one's sexuality "you must be gay" to like something that someone else thinks is below your age level.


I'll go out on a limb here and put my own neck on the line.

I am a big fan of animation. When it's good, and has some real depth to it. This doesnt mean that I'm a fan of "little kid stuff". I don't like SpongeBob. Sorry to say it, but I don't. Some people do, that's fine. I refuse to subscribe to any belief that animated films and series are for little kids only. Just because kids enjoy animation doesnt mean that adults can't.


There are animated films that are not aimed at little kids you know. There are films that are aimed at everyone. Perhaps you remember a man by the name of Walt Disney. Some people shudder at the mere mention of the Disney name. These people dont realize what it was that Walt himself stood for.

It was just after Bambi was released that Walt was being interviewed for his comments about the movie, which was new at the time. Walt was asked if he thought that the forest fire scenes would scare little kids.

Walts response was simply: "I don't make movies for little kids....I make movies for everyone!"

This is what the spirit of animation was always meant to be. Animation was never meant to be a realm that only little kids could partake in. It was meant to be a visual expression of art and emotion and settings and places that builds a story that anyone could identify with, enjoy, or understand. At the very least it is entertainment.

Over the years that has split and most of your cartoons these days are aimed at select audiences. Your Japanimation is typically aimed at pre-teen and early-teen audiences...

Your educational anmation is aimed at little kids. Theres some that makes no sense whatsoever to us, but is meant to be entertaining to the younger ones.

The market has become saturated with these above....and that gives the rest of animation out there that is aimed at everyone a bad name. It's sad to see. but there's animation that goes beyond these select audiences, and can be enjoyed by young ones and adults alike. For a while most of these have been out of the public eye in the television realm, but they are making a comeback. I think the fact that so many adults seem to enjoy SpongBob is that it does have a few lines in it every now and then which kids don't really get but adults understand, and find funny.

And another series that is brand new and is already beginning to make an impact is Lilo and Stitch....it's more...tangible than most other offerings on TV these days. Got a bit more emotion than we've seen in many animated series...and alot more real issues that kids and adults understand, while being entertaining and hillarious at the same time. If you can balance laughs with tears, emotion with understanding, you come out with a very valuable piece of animation that is not immature in the least. It's wholesome.


This is terribly off topic but I had to include that, in defense of animation. It's not just for little kids. If it has the right qualities, people of any age should be able to enjoy it shamelessly, and its sad that people condemn the entire genre.



Back to the topic at hand...it's important to remember that softer side of yourself because life is too damn short to take every minute of it seriously. Relax and enjoy yourself, and if something brings you joy, let it, and don't let anyone make you feel bad about it.

There are expections....I mean....teletubbies at 21 is kinda ridiculous, but you CAN grow up and be mature, while still remaining in touch with your childhood...and yourself.

I feel sorry for people who can't smile a little more often and shed all of those layers of ridigness that they think age is supposed to be. Age is a number. It's what's inside your heart and soul that counts. Live a little.



User currently offlineCptkrell From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3219 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 1230 times:

Well, I did "speed-read" the article, but even so, went back to several things that stuck in my mind to get a feeling of what the thrust was. Without spending a lot of time analyzing the professor's analyzation, I get the feeling that it's more a presentation of anecdotal filler rather than a particularly serious study (although I do think some references are quite valid).

To read a statement like "Our society is full of lost boys and girls hanging out on the age of adulthood." makes me wonder when this professor got a chance to look at the real world before he took pen to hand (keyboard to press?), and his apparent accolades to journalist Joyce Millman who wrote "...armed with all the self-knowledge you now possess, you could go back and erase every choice" ; well, duh! But he calls this an astute observation. Hmmm.

"Since (1950) virtually every industrial country has seen a massive rise in the number of single-person households." Ummhmmm. And most industrial nations have seen rises in all population(s), period, in the last 53 years. Would it not be common sense to extrapolate that there would be rises in just about everything; rich people, poor people, cows eaten, beverages bottled, homes built, and yes, single-person households?

Are kids growing up "too fast"; is competition too much; what is "nostalgia"?
Might be a real serious essay, but again, I find this to be a bit superficial, but maybe my (mistaken?) distrust of "professors of sociology" is surfacing.

Perhaps my favorite observation is from Vaporlock who wrote, in part; "...it is the quality time we spend with them[our kids]." How true...Jack



all best; jack
User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1169 times:

The Children Who Won't Grow Up

you mean futterman?

signed,
everyone that was spotting at JFK today. (10/18)



"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineJimbobjoe From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 648 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1156 times:

I believe there are a lot of people who have a highly linear view of aging/maturity. This seems entirely absurd...some may grow up very linearly, but I think most people will do lots of bouncing around, with elements of their persona moving at all sorts of different speeds. (The book "Ageless body, timeless mind" said that there may be a certain amount of genetic programming for aging, but a lot of aging may simply be caused by the fact that the brain consciously does not know of anything else.)

We have more freedom and wealth to follow some very interesting life paths. It all seems pretty cool to me.

The author of this article spent much time talking about people living at home with parents, and singly. The former is a bothersome idea in western, and particularly, US society, where we have this very artificial idea of 18 being some magical point at which people are adults and move away (hell...most people are convinced that every state in the US has an age of conset of 18...which is not the case.) At any rate, people living at home well into "adulthood" is not unusual...and is culture specific. In Russia, it always seemed to me that no one moved out, both because of a lack of real estate, and also because it's not the cultural thing to do. (Russian acquiantances of mine, living here in the US, are building a house with their parents. The two houses are large, modern, suburban houses, but will be connected to each other. That's very important to them, and they're willing to do it, in spite of the fact that it makes the house's resale value a bit shaky.)



User currently offlineUsairwys757 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1121 times:

Give me a freaking break guys. You have to enjoy life and have fun while you still have it. Personally I hate people who take everything seriously and have no sense of humor, or have any fun because they think its just for kids. Some of you people need to lighten up a bit, and dont let the kid in you die, once that happens, you wont even have time to have fun anymore. Just lighten up and let the kid in all of us live.

User currently offlineJamesag96 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 2095 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1114 times:

"Screw you guys...I am going home."
Eric Cartman

A spokesperson for a generation.




Why Kate, You're not wearing a bustle. How lewd.
User currently offlineSeb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11124 posts, RR: 15
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1087 times:

I am over 21 but I enjoy watching Teletubbies sometimes. Spongebob is so funny! He has a starfish buddy and lives in a pineapple! Sometimes at work, we take out the toys for the kids meals and play with them. I can also sing all the songs from Blues Clues.

I did enjoy the film Spirited Away and have read Silas Marner and Tale of Two Cities just to read them. I also know how to work on my car and I speak two languages.

So what? I am happy. Sometimes I just gotta unplug my brain.

GO CANUCKS!!



Life in the wall is a drag.
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