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Trivial Facts You Just Have To Be Aware Of...  
User currently offlineKlm-md11 From Greece, joined Mar 2002, 471 posts, RR: 1
Posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1981 times:

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, and purple.

Clans of long ago that wanted to get rid of their unwanted people without killing them use to burn their houses down - hence the expression "to get fired."

Canada is an Indian word meaning "Big Village".

There are two credit cards for every person in the United States.

Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.

"I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

The term "the whole 9 yards" came from WWII fighter pilots in the South Pacific. When arming their airplanes on the ground, the .50 caliber machine gun ammo belts measured exactly 27 feet, before being loaded into the fuselage. If the pilots fired all their ammo at a target, it got "the whole 9 yards."

The word "samba" means "to rub navels together."

The international telephone dialing code for Antarctica is 672.

The glue on Israeli postage stamps is certified kosher.

Mel Blanc (the voice of Bugs Bunny) was allergic to carrots.

Until 1965, driving was done on the left-hand side on roads in Sweden. The conversion to right-hand was done on a weekday at 5pm. All traffic stopped as people switched sides. This time and day were chosen to prevent accidents where drivers would have gotten up in the morning and been too sleepy to realize that *this* was the day of the changeover.

The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin during World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

Dr. Seuss pronounced "Seuss" such that it rhymed with "rejoice."

In Casablanca, Humphrey Bogart never said "Play it again, Sam."

Sherlock Holmes never said "Elementary, my dear Watson."

More people are killed annually by donkeys than die in air crashes.

The term, "It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye" is from Ancient Rome. The only rule during wrestling matches was, "No eye gouging." Everything else was allowed, but the only way to be disqualified was to poke someone's eye out.

A 'jiffy' is an actual unit of time for 1/100th of a second.

The average person falls asleep in seven minutes.

Hershey's Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it's kissing the conveyor belt.

Money isn't made out of paper, it's made out of cotton.

The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from and old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.

An ostrich's eye is bigger that it's brain.

The longest recorded flight of a chicken is thirteen seconds

-There are 18 different animal shapes in the Animal Crackers cookie zoo!

-Your body is creating and killing 15 million red blood cells per second!

-There are no clocks in Las Vegas gambling casinos!

-The most popular first name in the world is Muhammad!

-Tablecloths were originally meant to be served as towels with which dinner guests could wipe their hands and faces after eating

-Tourists visiting Iceland should know that tipping at a restaurant is considered an insult

-The First product to have a bar code was Wrigleys gum!

-A quarter has 119 grooves on its edge, a dime has one less groove.......

-Every time you lick a stamp you're consuming about 1/10 of calorie...

-Over 10,000 birds a year die from smashing into windows

-Thomas Edison the,"lightbulb inventor", was afraid of the dark

-A car uses 1.6 ounces of gas idling for one minute and helf an ounce is used to start the average automobile

-A lightning bolt generates tempertures five times hotter than those found at the sun's surface

-Its estimated that 4 million "junk" telephone calls, phone solicitations by persons or programmed machine are made every day in the US

-Takes glass one million years to decompose, which means it never wears out and can be recycled an infinite amount of times

-Forest fires move faster uphill than downhill

-The Philadelphia mint produces 26 million pennies per day

-The two-foot long bird called a Kea that lives in New Zealand(been there) likes to eat strips of rubber around car windows

-Most lipstick contains fish scales

-Skepticisms is the longest word that alternates hands when typing

-One ragweed plant can release as many as one billion grains of pollen

-No piece of square dry paper can be folded more than 7 times in half

-Over 2,500 left handed people a year are killed from using products made for right handed people

-There are more than 10 million bricks in the Empire State Building

-If you counted 24 hours a day, it would take 31,688 years to reach one trillion(estimated on computer)

-Taphephobia is the fear of being buried alive

-The sun is 330,330 times larger than the earth

-Clinophobia is the fear of beds

-The only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter is ,"uncopyrightable"

-Pinocchio is Italian for ,"pine eye"

-Porcupines float in water

-The AVE. life span for a major league baseball is 5 to 7 pitches

-The sloth(an ugly monkey I believe) moves so slowly that a gteen algae can grow undisturbed on its fur

-Cat urin glows under a black light

-The electric chair was invented by a dentist



GELUK IS GELUL MET EEN K
27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 1, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1952 times:

Fascinating stuff!

The sloth is not a monkey. I'm not a zoologist but I've seen many of them. They are probably not any closer related to primates than they are to mice or elephants. They are really strange animals. And they have one fast move. If you catch one on the ground he will draw one claw back ever so slowly. If you are foolish enough to be there when he gets it all the way back it will come forward with about the same speed as a striking snake. Their claws are very dirty and it would be a nasty wound.

I have a picture of a sloth that I took hanging on a telephone wire looking for leaves. Did I mention that they are not very bright? Used to find them on the posts of my carport - looking for leaves.




Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineGoose From Canada, joined Aug 2003, 1840 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1943 times:

Canada is taken from a Iroquois word, kanata, actually. It does mean "the village."

From http://www.histori.ca/minutes/minute.do?ID=10123;

Jacques Cartier came from the French court of King Francis I to explore North America. In 1534, on his first voyage, he explored the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In Chaleur Bay, he met aboriginal people for the first time. They were Micmac people, and their meeting was the first time that the French and the natives traded furs. For centuries to come, fur trading would be important in the development of the North American colonies.

When Cartier sailed farther up the gulf and into the Bay of Gaspé, he and his men were greeted warmly by a group from the Iroquoian nation of Stadaconé. They had come from their home, which is now the site of Québec City, on a fishing expedition.

The story goes that Cartier asked the chief, Donnacona, what the land was called. The chief, who was inviting Cartier into their camp, replied "kanata," their word for village, as well as their name for the area around their home, Stadaconé. Maybe Cartier understood Donnacona, or maybe he did not, but "Canada" has remained the name of the whole vast territory that comprises our country.



"Talk to me, Goose..."
User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1929 times:

"I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

No.

(In case you haven't guessed, "No" is a complete sentence as used above.)



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineMYT332 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 9112 posts, RR: 70
Reply 4, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1918 times:

A Sentence is:
A grammatical unit that is syntactically independent and has a subject that is expressed or, as in imperative sentences, understood and a predicate that contains at least one finite verb.

So no is not a sentence, i am is.



One Life, Live it.
User currently offline707cMf From France, joined Mar 2002, 4885 posts, RR: 29
Reply 5, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

-If you counted 24 hours a day, it would take 31,688 years to reach one trillion(estimated on computer)

You need a computer to divide 1,000,000,000,000 by (365.25x24x3600) ???

707


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

Skepticism is actually spelt scepticism, so it doesn't work.


Where I am, anyway.  Big grin



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlinePhaeton From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 406 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1903 times:

I thought that the conversion from left-hand side roads to right-hand side ones in Sweden took place at about 4 o'clock in the morning.


"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.", Winston Churchill
User currently offlineDC-10 Levo From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 3432 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1902 times:

That's really interesting! Especially this one:

Over 2,500 left handed people a year are killed from using products made for right handed people

Thank God I'm right handed.

DC-10


User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1900 times:

A Sentence is:
A grammatical unit that is syntactically independent and has a subject that is expressed or, as in imperative sentences, understood and a predicate that contains at least one finite verb.
So no is not a sentence, i am is.


"No" is a complete sentence, in the appropriate context, because the presence of the subject and verb is implied. It is read as if it goes "No, it is not," even though the it is not does not actually appear as written but rather is implied. There is a formal name for this reading-by-immplication process, but I can't recall it.



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 10, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1876 times:

"No" is an exclamation but it is only a sentence in the "elliptic" meaning that other words are missing but understood.

"I am." is a sentence, complete. Nothing missing. Nothing required to be understood.

Rose are red and violets are purple
Sugar is sweet and so's maple syrple


- Roger Miller



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineLjungdahl From Sweden, joined Apr 2002, 907 posts, RR: 36
Reply 11, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1866 times:

Until 1965, driving was done on the left-hand side on roads in Sweden. The conversion to right-hand was done on a weekday at 5pm. All traffic stopped as people switched sides. This time and day were chosen to prevent accidents where drivers would have gotten up in the morning and been too sleepy to realize that *this* was the day of the changeover.

No.

The conversion was at 5am, on September 3, 1967, and I'm quite sure it was a Sunday morning.

Anyway, I was 5 years old back then...  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

/Johan


User currently offlineJcs17 From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 8065 posts, RR: 38
Reply 12, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1853 times:

The most important trivial fact that anyone must know is that in the year 2001, 16 people were killed by shark attacks....130 people were killed by falling coconuts.


America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
User currently offlineSeb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11659 posts, RR: 15
Reply 13, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1833 times:

I read somewhere the back of the (I think) Canadian $2 note shows Parlement but the US flag is flying on top. I bought at Canadian $2 note yesterday but it shows a small village along a river, so I am still researching that one.

The first hockey team west of the Mississippi to win the Stanley Cup was the Vancouver Millionares in 1915. The first US team to win was the Seattle Metropolitans in 1917

GO CANUCKS!!



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineEspion007 From Denmark, joined Dec 2003, 1691 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1830 times:

130 people were killed by falling coconuts.

that must be the most pathetic way to die Big grin hmmm,i feel like starting another random thread...



Snakes on a Plane!
User currently offlineLfutia From Netherlands, joined Dec 2002, 3339 posts, RR: 27
Reply 15, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 1808 times:

Sadly, every 8 seconds, someone dies of smoking.

Leo/ORD



Leo/ORD -- Groetjes uit de VS! -- Heeft u laatst nog met KLM gevlogen?
User currently offlineIMisspiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6294 posts, RR: 33
Reply 16, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1778 times:

No. It is indeed a complete sentence. Nothing needs to be added and it completes the thought.


Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 17, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1774 times:

In the "sentence" NO, what is the subject and what is the predicate? Both are required to complete a sentence.

If you were standing in a crowd of people and one of them said "no" and there were no other actions taken or words spoken by anyone, would you understand everything about the sentence? Would you know what it meant. If he said "I am" you would - it means that he is, he exists. There are lots of single syllables you can exclaim that seem to complete a thought. Sometimes you can just speak out loud the common word for what you just stepped in and everyone will know how you feel about stepping in it, but that does not make it a sentence.

A sentence has a subject (who did it or to whom it was done - usually a noun but can be a verb in gerunds) and a predicate (what was done, or is - a verb) "No has these things only by implication.

There is a whole other thread possible with the one-word utterances that seem to convey something. It does not make them sentences. That word has specific meaning that is not met by the single word "no"






Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 46
Reply 18, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1772 times:

It has to be done. Bickering over a freaking one or two word sentence.



User currently offlineCommander_Rabb From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 771 posts, RR: 7
Reply 19, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1766 times:

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, and purple.

Want to bet?



User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1765 times:

Banco wrote:

"Skepticism is actually spelt scepticism, so it doesn't work.

Where I am, anyway."


True -- where you are, apparently. Otherwise, both spellings are acceptable. From dictionary.com:

skep·ti·cism also scep·ti·cism ( P ) Pronunciation Key (skpt-szm)
n.
A doubting or questioning attitude or state of mind; dubiety. See Synonyms at uncertainty.
Philosophy.
The ancient school of Pyrrho of Elis that stressed the uncertainty of our beliefs in order to oppose dogmatism.
The doctrine that absolute knowledge is impossible, either in a particular domain or in general.
A methodology based on an assumption of doubt with the aim of acquiring approximate or relative certainty.
Doubt or disbelief of religious tenets.


BTW, "spelt" can only be spelled "spelled" in American English -- so you see, all versions of English have their own peculiarities.


User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16282 posts, RR: 56
Reply 21, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1753 times:

It has to be done. Bickering over a freaking one or two word sentence.


Who gave you shaft authority Matt?



Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 46
Reply 22, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1751 times:

Excuse me, but as the one who hosts the actual Shaft image, and being a member of the LGA/JFK Shaft Team, I'll Shaft whoever I want and no one is in any position to question it.

User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16282 posts, RR: 56
Reply 23, posted (10 years 7 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1744 times:

Well, I'm a member of the Shaft Oversight Committee (SOC) which governs its use....so effectively, you report to me.

I'll look the other way this time, as a favour to you.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineIlikeYYC From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1373 posts, RR: 20
Reply 24, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1681 times:

seb146.

I have heard that rumor before, but it is not true. It is actually the old Red Ensign. It was red with the Union Jack in the same corner as the stars on the U.S. flag. The shield of the royal arms of Canada was also displayed on the flag. The Red Ensign was flown until 1965 when Canada adoped the current Maple Leaf flag.

http://www.indefual.net/canada/myths/

http://www.canadianheritage.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/df1_e.cfm
(hope the link works)

 Smile Andrew



Fighting Absurdity with Absurdity!
25 Post contains links Radarbeam : The 2$ canadian note with the US flag on it is not true. http://www.cdnpapermoney.com/English/BoC/Flag0002.htm
26 IMisspiedmont : I am....What? I am... Who? I am... Where? I am... Why? I am... When? No. One word covers things quite well, just as "I am", but is shorter.
27 SlamClick : IMisspiedmont It is not about your opinion or mine. The English language has rules. They were taught in elementary school where I grew up. I don't kno
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