Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Strange Cuisine From Your Country/ethnicity  
User currently offlineCsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1360 posts, RR: 4
Posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1913 times:

What signature dish from your country/ethnicity is something that people outside would find it impossible to get down?

Not too many unique things from the States per se (excepting of course, say McDonalds) but I'll start with two New York things and one Jewish thing.

Egg Creams - Ice cream or milk and seltzer with syrup. Absolutely gross to most non-New Yorkers, actually pretty gross to me.

Celery soda which I've never seen outside of the New York area. Actually not bad.

Gefilte Fish - You have to sort of be "to the shtetl born." Technically I think it is pickled and breaded Pike or Whitefish. Very difficult to get used to.


I have one food experience as an outsider that I still remember.
In college my roomate was from Britain and got me to try Marmite. Couldn't get it down. It was horrible!






I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
47 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3266 posts, RR: 17
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1900 times:

When I visited England a few years ago, I was offered Yorkshire Pudding. My host mentioned that most non "British" could'nt handle it. I, however did'nt have a problem with it.


Yay Pudding!
User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5096 posts, RR: 35
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1884 times:

Go3Team, i think its more the concept that the non british cant handle. Having a yorkshire pudding with your main course. Speaking of which my sunday dinner is nearly ready, Roast Beef and Yorkshire pudding!

Us Scots have the "Great chieftain o' the pudden race": Haggis.

Sheeps stomach stuffed with oats, onions, spices and all the bits of a sheep you would normally throw away: lungs, heart and liver. Lovely!

We also have Porriage, Hash-Browns, Stovies and Scotch Broth which is a bit more appealing.

And not forgetting the Cuisine that everyone loves: Scottish Salmon washed down with Whisky!



That'll teach you
User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3266 posts, RR: 17
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1880 times:

"Us Scots have the "Great chieftain o' the pudden race": Haggis."

I was making sure no one put that on my plate while I was over there!  Big grin



Yay Pudding!
User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1875 times:

Dormice are considered a great (but rare) delicacy in Slovenia. And, no, they are not really mice, but rather more squirrel-like forest rodents. They are also eaten in some other parts of southern and south-central Europe and were even enjoyed by the Romans. Of course, not all people approve of using dormice for food.

INFO ON DORMICE: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/269.shtml

INFO ON DORMOUSE HUNTING IN SLOVENIA (interesting info, but written in somewhat awkward semi-academese):
http://www.glirarium.org/dormouse/cult-slovenian-persic.html


Image: bbc.co.uk

[Edited 2004-03-21 18:48:16]

User currently offlineCsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1360 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1872 times:

Nighthawk,
when I was a vegetarian, I had vegetarian "haggis" over there - tofu, tempeh, and God only knows what else plus the oats and spices. I was on the lookout for the deep-fried Mars bars but didn't see them.



I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13815 posts, RR: 63
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1869 times:

Nighthawk,

No wonder my father learned to cook Indian style when he was working over there!
But the German province of Rheinland-Pfalz has a very similar dish called the "Pfälzer Saumagen" (Sow´s stomach, Palatine style). Since this province is the home of former chancellor Helmut Kohl and this meal is his favourite dish, all foreign dignitaries had to eat it (Uhg!).

My mother likes a very smelly cheese from her home province Hessen (Handkäs). I had to leave the kitchen when she unwrapped one.

Jan


User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1863 times:

BTW, if anyone intends to do some dormouse trapping  Big grin, here is a quick Slovenian recipe from http://www.soupsong.com/znov01.html:

"4 dormice fried in oil, sprinkled with flour then stewed in water with potatoes, herbs, salt, pepper, and lemon peel--flavored with vinegar just before serving."



[Edited 2004-03-21 18:33:54]

User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24824 posts, RR: 56
Reply 8, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1859 times:

Nothing beats Haggis, Neeps and Tatties washed down with a wee dram of whisky  Big grin


When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8095 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1853 times:

Haggis aint all that bad.  Big thumbs up


This Website Censors Me
User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1845 times:

Spleen dumplings -- made from, yes, spleen -- are common in Slovenia as well as in some nearby countries (including Austria, the Czech Republic, and parts of Northeastern Italy).

[Edited 2004-03-21 18:57:04]

User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1836 times:

You say whisky, but you really mean Irn-Bru  Big thumbs up Turns you'r insides orange. Big grin

User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5096 posts, RR: 35
Reply 12, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1834 times:

ScottishLaddie: Its made frae real girders dont ya know!  Big grin

Anyway, the official British meal is "curry". Cant get more british than that :P



That'll teach you
User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

Skåne Aquavit! Damn I hate that stuff...  Big grin

User currently offlineRussophile From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

For Australia it would have to be Vegemite without a doubt. Also Roo tail soup -- once you get around the fact that you might be eating Skippy, you should be right.

Also drop bear casseroles and hoop snake salads make for tasty eating.


User currently offlineCptkrell From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3220 posts, RR: 13
Reply 15, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1816 times:

Eating live animals usually doesn't set well with me. Oysters are a personal exception.

Modern westerners are often turned off by cuisine that is common in other areas of the world, but some people here still delight in pickled pork snouts and such. I muse at southern relatives badmouthing my taste for escargot but turn around and fry-up pig's intestines for themselves. Regards



all best; jack
User currently offlineAOMlover From France, joined Jul 2001, 1301 posts, RR: 11
Reply 16, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1813 times:

FROG LEGS and SNAILS all the wayyyyyyyyyyyy !  Wink/being sarcastic
The French are world-famous for those...
And yet I find those two dishes disgusting, although I don't know how they taste, I would never eat something made of frog or snail...blah !


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8095 posts, RR: 24
Reply 17, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1804 times:




This Website Censors Me
User currently offlineRabenschlag From Germany, joined Oct 2000, 1005 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

In Germany, there are many strage dishes. Just to name a few:

* Mettbroetchen. This is *raw* ground pork with pepper and raw onions on a bread roll. actually, I like it.

* Blutwurst: type of black pudding. sausage made with pork blood and thick pieces of pork fat. I hate it.

* Sauerbraten: A marinated roast beef. Put the beef in a gravy made of vinegar, juniper, laurel, onions and let it in the fridge for a week. than cook slowly. nothing strange yet? well, many use horseflesh instead of beef.


User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 13
Reply 19, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

I'm too mixed to narrow it down to one dish, so I'll just pick something that I thought was strange when I visited Australia:

Vegimite. I couldn't handle it. However, everywhere I went in Australia, the butter was excellent. I later found out they use buffalo milk or something like that.



FSP


User currently offlineTYSGoVols From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 634 posts, RR: 16
Reply 20, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1784 times:

Well it is not a food for every day but, according to old wives tales in teh area hog jawls are supposed to bring good luck it you eat them on New Years day along with black eyed peas. i don't believe in luck so I just eat teh hog jawls. Its just like baccon. i also consider fired chicken an ethnic food of the south. NOT KFC (not that I don't like it) real home fried chicken. Yeah sure you can get it anywhere but, no where near as good as it is in the SOUTH.
<>< Garen



Rocky Top You'll Always be home sweet home to me, Good ole' Rocky Top WOOOOO
User currently offlinePendrilsaint From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 685 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1780 times:

Garen, you are quickly becoming my new favorite person on this forum lol. Also, let's not forget Southern cornbread! There are two types, low country and mountain. I personally like mountain cornbread which is crumbly and thick, while lowland is sweet and cake like. Mountain cornbread can also have fried chitlins in it. (Fried pig intestine) I know it sounds good, but when you hit a piece of warm, fried, pig skin inside that cornbread, it's like heaven.

User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1771 times:

Here in the southern/southwest USA... there's Chit'lins (chitterlings), Tripe, Tongue, and Rocky Mountain Oysters.


They are (respectively): hog intestine; hog or cow stomach; cow tongue; and cattle testicles.



I'll try most things... but I've eaten none of the above.


User currently offlineTYSGoVols From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 634 posts, RR: 16
Reply 23, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1766 times:

Ahhhhhh how could I forget cornbread. Mmmmmmmmmmmmm I wanna go home so momma can cook some food for me. I hate cafateria food on campus. oh and don't forget fried catfish. Not the store bought I am talking catch it yourself gut it yourself catfish. I live right along the banks of the French Broad River ahh that is some good eating.

<>< Garen



Rocky Top You'll Always be home sweet home to me, Good ole' Rocky Top WOOOOO
User currently offlineEspion007 From Denmark, joined Dec 2003, 1691 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1757 times:

caviar. not THAT strange,but no one beside my russian friend and I eat it. i dont know why, they are just like chicken eggs(but saltier and more expensive). During some french thing every1 in our french class had to bring in some type of french quisine.i brought 1/4 kilo of caviar-needless to say only 10% was eaten by my class.

there are also sprats(small fish that are like sardines) that are completley dried. to eat it,you have to bite off the head.they are really salty,and once my friend brought them to some other people. They were hesitent,but found it additive  Smile

BTW,the country is Russia.



Snakes on a Plane!
25 Seb146 : I have yet to figure out the strage obsession this country has with deep fat frying stuff. I will eat Walla Walla onion rings and breaded, deep fried
26 Greg : Concorde...are those the only testicles that haven't been in your mouth...?
27 TYSGoVols : Fried is the best way to cook just about anything. Here is just a small list. By the way I think fried should be its own food group. Fried Okra Fried
28 LHMark : I like blutwurst! I buy it a couple times a month. All I can offer is the Garbage plate. Yum.
29 Krushny : Some Spanish delicacies : - Morcillas: blood sausages . - Caracoles : Snails. - Criadillas : testicles of some animal. - Rabo de toro : bull's tail..
30 Lan_Fanatic : Chilean countryside delikatessen... -Ñachi: goat blood...served directly from the goat to your glass. Gross. -Chunchules: Intestine of cows and porks
31 Tokolosh : Here are a few: NL: Raw herring, you throw your head back and let it slip down your throat Hong Kong: Mostly anything that moves, but there is a pigeo
32 Post contains images SWA TPA : I dont know what you call this but I have always, since I was a kid, eaten pineapple rings covered with mayonaise and topped with shredded cheddar ch
33 Alessandro : Two words, fermented herring. Smells like a gas leak or a sewage breakdown..
34 Redngold : Pennsylvania Dutch: Shoo-Fly Pie. Basically, it's a pie made of molasses. You bake a pie crust, pour in a whole bunch of molasses, then sprinkle a mix
35 TYSGoVols : I have heard about this. i beleive it is in heriman TN not totally sure it may be Claiborn County, yeah I know big difference. It is a Vinegar pie. It
36 Usatoeze : I have a lengthy list. By the way this post was hysterical. Scotland: As previously noted Haggis is disgusting. England: If someone offers you "Drippi
37 TYSGoVols : Actually we do the Collard greens and ham. How could i neglect greens and ham with some bannana pepper juice on them. As a side dish to any fried meat
38 Andz : Mettbroetchen. This is *raw* ground pork with pepper and raw onions on a bread roll. actually, I like it. I LOVE this stuff!! Sauerbraten: A marinated
39 CannibalZ3 : Grits and fried okra are things you will never see outside the south. I dont know what the hell grits are but they can be pretty good, depending where
40 Redngold : Some other Pennsylvania Dutch items: Tripe = pickled pig's stomach. Looks pinkish-white, usually cut into one-inch cubes or small chunks. Red Beet Egg
41 TYSGoVols : Ye sokra does exist. We grow it in the garden. Grits however, were never common around my house. They are bits of corn in a flour type soup/paste more
42 SlamClick : Redngold how about scrapple in Pennsylvania or goetta in Ohio? Slam could I have some kim chee on my haggis? Click
43 Phxairfan : How bout some fried Alligator, or some roasted Nutria(a big rat essentially). Haven't tried either as they aren't kosher, but I hear some people enjoy
44 Airmale : In Pakistan we have a few, one dish called "Kheeree" is barbequed udder (cow's breast) the texture is chewy sort of like squid, quite tasty, other tha
45 SWA TPA : Grits!? Did somebody mention grits!? Mmmmmmmmm boy! I could sure go for a big bowl of buttery grits right about now. Add some cheese into it... oh ye
46 Post contains images DLKAPA : When I go to arkansas, we eat squrrel. Seriously Arkansas has it's own ethnicity: Language, Food, Culture. DLKAPA
47 TYSGoVols : Squirel is a food that my family used to at before I was born. it is not an Arkansas thing. Deer is a great meat. I love to eat bambi, oh so tender es
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Great Literature From Your Country Or Language posted Tue Oct 31 2006 03:46:21 by Csavel
Top Travel Destinations Abroad From Your Country? posted Sat Jul 1 2006 23:27:51 by Andaman
Successfull Athletes From Your Country! posted Sun Oct 30 2005 22:31:14 by Pera
Food From Your Country / City posted Thu Mar 3 2005 12:56:35 by Avianca
Christmas Bakery From Your Country. posted Wed Dec 15 2004 12:10:38 by OYRJA
Most Beatiful Woman From Your Country? posted Wed May 12 2004 21:45:32 by Bofredrik
Hottest Babes From Your Country? posted Tue Jun 5 2001 13:07:13 by Indianguy
Your Favorite Laws From Another Country posted Thu Mar 31 2005 22:32:26 by L.1011
Presents From Your Own Country For Friends posted Sun Feb 27 2005 15:05:10 by NumberTwelve
Buying ITunes Songs From Other Country's Stores? posted Wed Nov 15 2006 16:26:42 by Trav110