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Spelling And Grammar  
User currently offlineCopper1 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 439 posts, RR: 1
Posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 821 times:

This thread is not directed at anyone who's first language is not english.

Will those of you from Canada, the United States and other english speaking countries please learn how to spell ( or type ). I can't believe how bad the overall quality of some of the posts are. I expect , when I read the user profile, to see that the originator of the thread is about eight years old but I am constantly stunned to see they are at least in their mid to late teens or older.

Right below the box where you type your thread it says and I quote " PLEASE CHECK YOUR SPELLING "

Try using a dictionary if you still are taught how to do so. I don't think spell check is available in this forum.

Sorry if I have hurt anyone's feelings but better you learn now than when you are typing a resume for some job you want.

Copper1

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCstarU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 670 times:

i is produkt ov untied state pubic skool sistemm  

User currently offlineSouthflite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 675 times:

The spelling mistake that I see most often is the possesive form of "it" -> it's its  
(ie. it's means "it is", whereas the possesive form of it has no apostrophe).

Oh, and check my message header for the close runner-up in the misspelling stakes : it's "a lot", not "alot".

Enough to make ol' Noah Webster spin in his grave ....



User currently offlineBrissie_lions From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 682 times:

Copper1....don't take offence at this....but an American telling us how to spell?

The word is colour not color

The word is authorisation not authorization

And what is the story about -ism's? Americans seem to take any word in the English language, and make a new word by adding -ism to the end of it.

Oh, also, I checked over your original post. I found the following mistakes.

You write:

"This thread is not directed at anyone who's first language is not english."

I write:

"This thread is not directed at anyone whose first language is not English."

You write:

"Will those of you from Canada, the United States and other english speaking countries please learn how to spell ( or type ). I can't believe how bad the overall quality of some of the posts are. I expect , when I read the user profile, to see that the originator of the thread is about eight years old but I am constantly stunned to see they are at least in their mid to late teens or older."

I write:

"Will those of you from Canada, the United States and other English countries please learn how to spell (or type)?. I can't believe how bad the overall quality of some of the posts are. I expect, when I read the user profile, to see that the originator of the thread is about eight years old, but I am constantly stunned to see they are at least in their mid to late teens, or older."

You write:

"Sorry if I have hurt anyone's feelings but better you learn now than when you are typing a resume for some job you want."

I write:

"Sorry if I have hurt anyone's feelings, but better you learn now, than when you are typing a resume for some job you want."

You will notice that English is a pronoun, and as such, should be spelt with a capital "E". Also a few commas here and there make a world of difference in the grammar. Sorry, but for this exam you get a B-  

Cheers

Scotty      







User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 4, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 671 times:

Copper1, CstarU, Southflite: you guys rock my world.

I've been totally amazed at some of the spelling and grammatical bombs on this site. Most are perpetrated by teens though.

How can one be taken seriously when one doesn't understand when to use "their", "there", or "they're" (typos notwithstanding); or when one uses the possessive form of "it" (that's one of my pet peeves as well Southflite. By the way, you misspelled "possessive." )

I agree with the observation regarding the U.S. school system. It is failing in this area.



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineMriya225 From French Polynesia, joined Nov 2011, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 668 times:

I make that mistake (possesive of it) fairly often - it's easy an easy one to make.

User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 666 times:

Hey Scotty, "English" is also an adjective.

Also, I think you're being hateful and intolerant of accepted "Americanized" spellings.

                 

Seriously though, linguistics and language are fascinating. The language has evolved differently here in America, just as it has in Australia. Thus, color lost its "u" here, "s" became "z" in many words, and we lost those annoying British dialects and pronunciations.              



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineSouthflite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 663 times:

TWFirst wrote:
-------------------------------
How can one be taken seriously when one doesn't understand when to use "their", "there", or "they're" (typos notwithstanding); or when one uses the possessive form of "it" (that's one of my pet peeves as well Southflite. By the way, you misspelled "possessive.")


Yes, I spotted that one AFTER I had already pressed the "Post" button ... serves me right for ripping off other people about their spelling 

Unfortunately, unlike Gary, I don't have access to the database for these posts - otherwise I would have cheated and edited it on the server  

Regards
Andrew Davies (Southflite)
Corrections Editor - Airliners.net


User currently offlineBrissie_lions From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 664 times:

What is strine?

Take a look at this site to see how English is suppose to be spoken (hey...it may even help you guys understand what us Aussies are yarning on about).

http://www.apex.net.au/~me/indexas.html

Later cobbers

Scotty


User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 9, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 659 times:

You are formally forgiven Andrew. As I stated, "typos notwithstanding."

I am not pretentious enough to claim never to make a mistake. There have been numerous times I've noticed errors after hitting the "Post" button. I call the phenomenon "Post Button Remorse."

                

BTW, my name is Andrew as well.



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineVirginLover From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 958 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 652 times:

We all make mistakes... the only thing that really gets on my nerves is "too" and "to".
too- also "I flew Virgin Atlantic too"
to- going somewhere, etc "I'm going to the airport"

 


User currently offlineCstarU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 648 times:

what's the correct spelling of:

canceled or cancelled
traveler or traveller

or it depends where you're from...


User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 643 times:

My Second College Edition of The American Heritage Dictionary shows both spellings for both words are acceptable.


An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineB-707 From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 497 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 645 times:

I don't think it really matters.

This is a forum. Speed is of the essence. I haven't got the time (or money) to proof read all the garbage I type.

One spelling mistake I hate is "definately"---- It should be "definitely"

Copper1. I had to laugh. If you were going to post such a thread, checking your own grammar should have been a guarantee. LMAO

Don't bother correcting this post. I couldn't care less if it has mistakes.  


User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 642 times:

No mistakes B-707. You get an A+ 100%  .

You're right. Speed sometimes prevents proofreading. However, your post communicates intelligence, so a typo or two wouldn't make me question your mental capacity. When a post is saturated with the most elementary mistakes though, I think it severely compromises the credibility of the contributor.



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineCarioca Canuck From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 632 times:

A feature to edit posts "once they have been posted" would be nice.....as opposed to the current BB programming.

User currently offlineAussiemite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 625 times:

I dont need to know how to spell, I was a physics/maths student

Regards,

Aussiemite


User currently offlineSouthflite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 626 times:

I liked that site, Brissie. Here's a story I spotted on South Africa's Independent Online re. the same thing:

====================================
Strewth, it's Strine online, mate
July 18 2000 at 08:19AM
By Brian Williams

Sydney - With the approach of the Sydney Olympics setting off a rise in national fervour, Australians are once again up in arms about the threat to their own way of speaking the queen's English.

Sydney newspapers have been full of letters from readers moaning how people now say "chicken" instead of "chook", threaten to beat people up with a baseball bat instead of a cricket bat and who have no idea of what of a "rat's coffin" is.

"The angst about American English is a common and cherished annoyance in Australia," said an article in the Sydney Morning Herald.

A letter to the Herald was even more direct.

"Stuff the chicken, Long live the chook," wrote Bob Dalrymple.

For those about to head to Australia for the September 15 to October 1 Games, or the hundreds of millions of television viewers, the following is a brief guide to key Australian slang words and phrases.

A is for
Aussie - the term Australians and foreigners use to describe the people down under

B is for
back o'Bourke - meaning in the middle of nowhere
banana bender - term for residents of tropical Queensland which once had a reputation for backwardness. Supposedly the only skill of Queenslanders was to put the bend in a banana.
bunyip - Australia's version of Bigfoot
bush - anywhere away from the city in Australia's vast countryside

C is for
Captain Cook - popular rhyming slang connected with the English explorer who discovered Sydney. "Take a Captain Cook" means "take a look"
chunder - vomit, or as it is also known in Australia, a technicolour yawn
cooee - a bush signal that you are lost

D is for
dinkum, fair dinkum, dinky di - they all mean the same - honest, genuine, truthful, the real thing
don't come the raw prawn - don't try to fool me
drongo - an unintelligent and worthless person

E is for
earbash - to talk nonstop

F is for
fair go - give someone a break, a fair hearing
fair crack of the whip - fair go

G is for
galah - a noisy parrot and used to describe someone who is noisy and makes no sense
g'day - traditional Australian greeting

H is for
hoon - a hooligan

I is for
icy-pole - ice cream on a stick

J is for
journo - journalist

K is for
king hit - a punch delivered without warning

L is for
lair - a show-off
larrikin - a ruffian
lamington - sponge cake covered in chocolate icing and coconut

M is for
mate - the word you'll hear most in Australia. Can refer to men and women.
Mexicans - term used by Queenslanders to describe other Australians who head north to take advantage in retirement of the state's all-year warm weather

N is for
never-never - the remotest part of the countryside

O is for
ocker - a boorish Australian
one-eyed trouser snake - penis
outback - remote part of the bush
Oz - Term for Australia

P is for
point percy at the porcelain - urinate
Pom - English person
push - gang of larrikins or ruffians

Q is for
Queenslander - style of tropical home

R is for
rat's coffin - a meat pie. Don't worry there is no rat meat in them

S is for
Sheila - Australian for woman
strine - Australian slang

T is for
tucker - food
two-pot screamer - someone unable to hold their drink
two-up - Australian gambling game played with coins

U is for
ute - a bakkie (South African slang for a small pick-up truck)

V is for
vegemite - sandwich spread similar to Marmite

W is for
walkabout - Aboriginal term meaning to wander

X is for
XXXX - Four X, a popular Australian beer

Y is for
yakka - work
yobbo - uncouth and aggressive person

Z is for
zack - a five-cent coin - Reuters
=======================================

Knew most of these from watching "Neighbours" and "Home & Away" (when I was younger, OK ). Also the differences in pronouciation : Aussies say a-pre-see-ate, whereas South Africans say a-pre-she-ate; also, it's pro-ject over there, but proj-ect here.

I've got several friends from Cape Town who are now living in Sydney, and they all love it there. Guess if I ever decide to join them, some of this will come in handy !!

Cheers,
Southflite
Cape Town, RSA


User currently offlineUALfa@jfk From United States of America, joined May 2000, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (14 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 602 times:

Yes! I was thinking that I was the only one annoyed at outrageously poor writing skills among our participants.

My pet peeve:

"Your" vs. "You're" as in

"If your going to the store..."

as opposed to, "If you're going to the store..."

Your = possession
You're = "you are," (a contraction).

The widespread misuse of these two words is astounding.


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