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User currently offlineJFKspotter From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 448 posts, RR: 7
Posted (10 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 987 times:

Hey everyone

I'm currently halfway through an EMT-Basic course here in New York. Anyone out there also a ff or EMT? If so, what level, and where? And what did you have to do in order to be one? (How long was your course, etc.)

-JFKspotter

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAndrej From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 961 times:

Hello JFKspotter,

I am an EMT-Basic in NJ, NREMT and MD

I took my NJ class last year, and it took 120 hours + 10 hours in hospital. I volunteer for my local squad (Woodbridge Township). Great time, great people!! Over the summer I work for Rural Metro. (OK company mostly GT, however I might look for another job, EMS runs)

I took my class from January to June. It was good class.

When I moved to college, I took refresher classes in MD and than I took 100 question test for MD.

Cheers,
Andrej


User currently offlineAlert3 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 962 times:

I am a full-time EMT, and a volunteer fireman. I'm actually at work right now. The EMT-Basic course was 140 hours (3-4 hrs per night, 3 days/wk, approx 3-4 months.) Then my EMT-Intermediate class was another 140 hours + 100 hours clinical experience. Drop me an e-mail, and we can chat (it's in my profile.)

Alert3


User currently offlineEmiratesA345 From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 2123 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 960 times:

I'm not sure I have this right...

Here in Canada if you want to be a paramedic, you have to go to college for 3-4 years. In the US, you can just take a course and become a paramedic?

Is there a difference between a paramedic and an EMT?

EmiratesA345 Smile/happy/getting dizzy



You and I were meant to fly, Air Canada!
User currently offlineAlert3 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 956 times:

Paramedics have more training than EMT's. Here, I know Swedish in Denver has a 6 month paramedic program + 1000 hours of clinicals. That 6 month's is 8-5, 5 days/week (in other words, full time school.) Most paramedic programs are around 1 year + clinicals. After that, you can get nationally registered, and most states will accept that, so you can work just about anywhere in the USA. Training is standardized by the Department of Transportation, although a few things vary state to state. Plus, if you want a degree after the paramedic program, usually you can take a few more basic classes, and get an associate's degree.

User currently offlineEmiratesA345 From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 2123 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 958 times:

So on a crew, 2 per bus I am assuming, is there always one EMT and one paramedic?

EmiratesA345 Smile/happy/getting dizzy



You and I were meant to fly, Air Canada!
User currently offlineAlert3 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 949 times:

It depends.... that is the way that my work does it. We switch calls, unless the paramedic has to take the call (i.e a code, or had to give medicines that we couldn't.) It works out good. I'm writing 2 reports right now, and my partner also has 2 from this morning. So, now the next call that comes, I take it. Some services run 2 paramedics to a truck, but it's more economical to only have one, so a lot of places do that.



User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 months 16 hours ago) and read 942 times:

EmeriatesA345, Paramedics and EMTS are two entirely different things.

In Alaska at least, you start out at an ETT, which is basicly just 1st aid. When my brother joined the volunteer fire department he had to get this rating in addition to his Firefighter 1 card.

Later he got and EMT1 which is more in depth trainging, there is also an EMT II and and EMT III which requires holding the next lower certificate for a period of time...I think it is two years. With each card is more privledges and responsiblities.

A Paramedic is a college trained medic, which takes two years of school, plus a period of practical training. It is not interchangeable with an EMT.




OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineBOEING747-700 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (10 years 3 months 15 hours ago) and read 940 times:

I do know that most Fire Fighters being hired on the Department in my region have to have some basic EMT training, I am gaining some skills to aid me as well for if and when I apply to the FD I can respond to the medical calls that make up about 80% of a Fire Officers job. There is a course offered for EMTs at most colleges and you pretty much have to take it or you will probably not even making to the resume screening in the HR service department. I do know that the Region of Waterloo here in Ontario had a posting for skilled EMTs and their web site is http://www.region.waterloo.on.ca

User currently offlineAndrej From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 3 months 14 hours ago) and read 929 times:

Hello all,

in NJ as well in another states, we are all EMTs. But we have different letter following EMT-B (Basic) EMT-I (Intermidiate, in MD it is called CRT) and EMT-P (Paramedic). These are set by DoT. Thus we are all EMTs but have different level of skill and knowledge.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

EMT-P take course, that last around 2 years, they are offered in many community colleges as well as in Fire Academies. I took EMT-B course, b/c it is fun and I like to help out. I am in college majoring in Econ. and Business Management.

In many states, there must be 2 EMTs on crew. One in back at all times. Usually we have 2 man crew, but there might be as much as 4. No more, bacuse there is would be no space for paramedic and the patient. Sometimes we take 2 patients at a time.

In NJ, 2 EMT-P are responding to calls. One rides in the back of the ambulance and other is following. They are on-line with doctor who tells them what medication to give. In MD there is only one EMT-P on call.

In NJ, you must be paid to be EMT-P, in MD one can volunteer. So, you see the difference.

Cheers,
Andrej

BTW, fellow EMTs what state do you live in?




User currently offlinePilothighflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 220 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (10 years 3 months 13 hours ago) and read 918 times:

I'm an EMT-B in CT

Paramedics can push drugs, intubate and do other fun things, like pushing Narcain with O.D. victims (Amazing to watch!)

For the crews in my local town the Bus is normally driven by an MRT (Medical response Tech., which is lower than EMT-B) with and EMT-B and EMT-I in the back. Paramedics are on call from a near by town and respond when needed (The decision is normally made by the dispatcher, so if sounds remotely bad expect help)

Robert


User currently offlineJFKspotter From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 448 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (10 years 3 months 13 hours ago) and read 915 times:

My class is 3hrs/night x 2 nights/week, for about 6 months, plus 10 hours of ER observation.

Just to explain a little more thuroughly, and for others to compare, NY has 5 levels of EMT:

CFR- Certified First Responder
EMT-Basic
EMT-Intermediate
EMT-Critical Care
and EMT-Paramedic

The county I live in does not observe the level of EMT-Intermediate, so therefore, I'm at the second of four levels.

As others said, Paramedic is pretty much the highest level, requiring much more extensive training and experience. The fire dept. I volunteer with runs 2 BLS ambulances, sometimes we have duty crews, other times it's simply whoever shows up.


User currently offlineAlert3 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (10 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 908 times:

Hey Pilothighflyer:

As an EMT-Intermediate, I can give Narcan also... Here's a few others I regularly give: nitro, ASA, D50, albuterol, morphine, IV or IM benadryl, Epinephrine, atropine, lidocaine, and many others... Also, we start IV's, can do interosseous infusions, give breathing treatments, give SQ, IM shots, and quite a few other cool things,.... so once again it varies big from state to state.



User currently offlineAZO From United States of America, joined Jun 2002, 767 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (10 years 3 months 2 hours ago) and read 900 times:

I work part-time as an EMT-B and am starting the EMT-P program in the fall. That takes about a year. That takes about 12-15 hours of classroom time and around 20 hours of clinical time a week.

My county is pretty strict and does not allow Basics to attend on anything except transfers, and does not even recognize Specialists/Intermediates. On top of that, my company recently made a rule (for insurance reasons) that we cannot even attend on those. Most medics are understanding of these limitations and let the Basic do as much as they can.

In addition to all that, a Basic can ONLY work on the truck if he or she is enrolled in the paramedic program. We have 11 ALS trucks, up to 8 or 9 on the road at a time (not including stand-by's or special events). There is another company in town who has 10 or 11 ALS trucks and 3 or 4 BLS just for transfers. In the south part of the county which is mostly rural, there is a service with 1 ALS and 2 BLS trucks. That is the only part of the county where the BLS crew can attend on calls, but only if the ALS is already out on a call.

Despite all that, I have never enjoyed a job this much. I actually look forward to going into work, and pick up as many hours as I can. Since I am only part time, I have limits on that due to being a full time college student and do not have a constant schedule, so I just fill in. This makes it hard to get full shifts, but this week I am working almost 50 hours with only 2 full shifts (12 and 14 hours).

We have a pretty even split of crews that are medic-medic and medic-EMT.

In Michigan we have four levels, similar to many other states. MFR (first responder), EMT-P, EMT-S (specialist, same as intermediate), and EMT-P.

I did my training in the summer of 2002. It was a 6 week program (academy session, as they called it) through Baker College. Class was 32 hours a week, plus clinicals.

And with that, I need to get showered and dressed for work. Filling in so a new medic can take her PEPP course.

If you have any questions, I would be more than happy to answer them as I am sure anyone here would be. You can ask in this thread or private message. Good luck!



Kalamazoozoozoozoozoozoozoo
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