Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
British English Vs. American English  
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (10 years 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2036 times:

I realize that many of my fellow posters here at A-net are not native English speakers and although their grasp of the language is outstanding, one thing that always grates on my ears, like finger nails on a chalk board, is the misuse of plurals as well as agreement of adjectives and nouns.

For instance, the Webster's Collegiate Dictionary states that the plural of aircraft is AIRCRAFT . What is the correct usage in British English.

Another major error I see all the time is an incorrect use of MUCH and MANY. Is this a British English thing as well?

For those of you from other countries, please don't bash me on this, I understand how difficult a foreign language can be.

I am Ueber Fluent in German, and still make mistakes, and always will, but strive to get it right one of these days.



43 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3313 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2025 times:

A corrective comment is always appreciated by most non-native Dtw.
In the same vein but westwards, it is rather surprising to see so many native US English speakers did not grasp the meaning of "then" and "than", as well as "to" and "too".


User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 39
Reply 2, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2015 times:

the misuse of plurals as well as agreement of adjectives and nouns

Agree with this one. Adjectives and verbs do not agree with the noun in number and gender in the English language.

And yes, the plural of aircraft is aircraft. Just as the plural of fruit is fruit.

One that really bugs me is they're vs their vs there.

Another one that really gets to me is "If I was Japanese". If takes the subjunctive! "Was" is incorrect. Please use "were"!

There's a lot of differences between English and American, in usage and spelling.

[Edited 2004-08-23 22:49:51]

User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 3, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2003 times:

The plural of 'aircraft' in 'British English' is indeed 'aircraft'. Although we just tend to call the language 'English' over here.

Edit: I'm not quite sure what differences you're referring to. Aside from some different spellings, the structure is much the same, as far as I know.

[Edited 2004-08-23 23:04:24]


It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1996 times:

What is the difference between British English & American English?!  Insane

It's English isn't it?!

Hmmm... Yeah man.

Justin Big grin


User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 39
Reply 5, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1990 times:

Sulman & Jkw777

Did you ever hear the joke (maybe it was true, I don't know) about the Yeoman conducting a guided tour of the Tower? He had a large group of tourists, and he was asking then who was from where. When he asked how many were from America, most hands shot up. That's when he asked "Just visiting, or here to learn the language?"


User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4124 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Edit: I'm not quite sure what differences you're referring to. Aside from some different spellings, the structure is much the same, as far as I know.

I agree with this. Other than the spelling and colloquialisms, American and British English are not too much different.



"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 39
Reply 7, posted (10 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1964 times:

Of course they aren't too much different. But there still are a lot of differences between the two. Spellings are the most obvious ones (sulphur and sulfur). Then we've got vocab. Many words used by one group just aren't used by the other (lorry). Many of the differences are in usage. In English, it's usually "... in hospital" in American, it's "...in the hospital". There's a few subtler usage differences as well. See if you ever notice a newspaper headline. The English one will say "British English vs American English" whilst the American one will say "British English Vs. American English".

User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 54
Reply 8, posted (10 years 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1950 times:

I must admit that I´m using a somewhat bastardized mixture of (mostly) US and (only some) british english... But this forum has certainly given me the opportunity to improve by practicing. (I know - too bad for all the poor souls who have to bear the tedium...  Big thumbs up)


By the way: Nobody in Germany uses the word "über" in the way english speakers apparently do. It´s quite as grating as the fingernails-on-blackboard misuse of their / there / they´re...  Wink/being sarcastic


User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 39
Reply 9, posted (10 years 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1928 times:

Klaus, why so über-sensitive? It's über-cool when foreigners use words like über in their day-to-day conversations, umlauts and all...

User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1922 times:

And yes, the plural of aircraft is aircraft.

I'm not certain of the British usage, but in the United States "aircraft" is not particularly common. Airplane(s) is heard much more frequently.



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 54
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1903 times:

Jasepl: Klaus, why so über-sensitive? It's über-cool when foreigners use words like über in their day-to-day conversations, umlauts and all...

Consider yourself slapped with a wet and stinky fish.  Smile


User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 47
Reply 12, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1888 times:

Imagine two people coming up to you on the street.

The first one says:

"Yo man...gimme some change cuz I is hungry."

Then the second one says:

"Pardon me ol chap, but I would consider it a great honour if you could spare some bloody change so that which I may procure my supper."

Who would you give to?

 Wink/being sarcastic


User currently offlineDeltaffindfw From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1440 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1874 times:


Words mean different things also. Brits go on holiday, American go on vacation. Lift vs elevator. Torch vs flashlight. Water closet vs restroom. Then of course, America is the only country who doesn't realize that football is played with a round ball...

My dad (having learned British English while growing up in India) using to say he was all fagged out (instead of saying tired). Of course, that was in the late 70s/early 80s. Obviously, he wouldn't say that anymore!!


User currently offlineWellHung From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

Imagine two people coming up to you on the street.

The first one says:

"Yo man...gimme some change cuz I is hungry."

Then the second one says:

"Pardon me ol chap, but I would consider it a great honour if you could spare some bloody change so that which I may procure my supper."

Who would you give to?


Both of them... as long as they're not Mexican.

Signed,
MattD

[Edited 2004-08-24 03:14:15]

User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4124 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1860 times:

Before the Brits start flaming me, I like the American way of spelling better (I'm backed by my parents who grew up with the British system...and they like the American way better too). When Brits spell "colour" why is the "u" not pronounced? At least "color" gets rid of that. Or a better example..."foetus" vs. "fetus"


"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 54
Reply 16, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1858 times:

You´re not trying to tell us there was any kind of consistency in the pronunciation of the english language to begin with, are you? Big grin

User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 47
Reply 17, posted (10 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1853 times:

Nice attempt at humour (har!), but the reality is that I wouldn't give ANYBODY "spare" change.

Nobody.

Now if someone approaches me and asks for some money because "they are hungry", I will ALWAYS offer to buy them something to eat. Doesn't matter who it is.

In some 15 years of being approached, I have had, exactly two takers, both of which ate the food like they really were starving.

I'll buy someone food. But I sure as hell am not about to give them money. This is because 1) they are looking to buy booze or weed or 2) are these scammers you hear about who lead otherwise "normal" lives, but have turned to panhandling because they think it's more lucrative (and perhaps it is), or both.

Like I said, with as many times as I have been approached and have offered to buy them food, just like they claim they want, the fact that only two people have ever taken me up on it really speaks volumes.


User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4124 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (10 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 1845 times:

You´re not trying to tell us there was any kind of consistency in the pronunciation of the english language to begin with, are you?

Haha, nooo. But it seems like sometimes American English is a bit closer to the pronunciation.



"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14000 posts, RR: 62
Reply 19, posted (10 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1828 times:

DTWClipper,

If you say Über fluent it could be confused with überflüssig (surplus)...

Jan


User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (10 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1824 times:

So what is the plural form of "aeroplane"?

 Smile


User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (10 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1813 times:

MD11Engineer:

After three years of Intensive study at the Goethe Institute, a Major in German Literature, an apprenticeship in Bavaria, two years in Duesseldorf, 1 year in Basel, and 1 year in Bern, I think I know what I mean.

American writers have a tendency to use the German 'ueber' to demonstrate an extreme ability or affinity for a specific activity, a direct reference to the NSDAP use of the term "uebermensch".

Never the less, thanks for the "infos" as most "euros" incorrectly say.

dtwclipper





User currently offlinePaulc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1490 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (10 years 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1794 times:

Brits are unlikely to say 'airplane' but aeroplane or aircraft

Here aircraft are made from Aluminium, in the US it Aluminum.

A well known author (George Bernard Shaw I think) described the relationship between the UK and US as "2 nations divided by a common language"



English First, British Second, european Never!
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29795 posts, RR: 58
Reply 23, posted (10 years 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1790 times:

Why do Americians call Flats Apartments when those flats are located so close together....

And why do the British call Apartments Flats when they are 3 dimensional spaces?



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 39
Reply 24, posted (10 years 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1786 times:

Hey, you can't blame the Brits by saying "Why do they...". It is their language we're using.

And I don't think anyone actually calls it a Water closet!

And, sorry Klaus!


25 Post contains images Soaringadi : There are enormous amounts of differences between American english, and British english..... here are a few : 1. Cookies Vs. Biscuits. 2. house Vs. Bu
26 Post contains links and images Mdsh00 : Chopper Vs. Helicopter I don't know about that one because "chopper" is still a slang term for a helicopter as is "ghetto bird." American -- I got no
27 Jasepl : Here's another one I don't quite get: You pay your bill with a cheque. Not the other way around!
28 Sulman : "I'm going out to smoke a fag" does not mean I'm taking to the streets to murder a homosexual, and "do you have a rubber" is not a request for a proph
29 Post contains images Banco : Ah, the English language. One of my favourite topics! Just on one point, aluminum and aluminium, it was, I believe, Humphrey Davy who coined the term,
30 PROSA : "Ass" might be American, and "arse" British, but you hear both Brits using "ass" and Americans using "arse"; in both cases the people are aware that t
31 Banco : Really? that's interesting PROSA, because people here use "ass" instead of "arse" for exactly the same reason.
32 MD11Engineer : Funny, in Ireland the term "ass" was mostly used meaning a male donkey! Jan
33 Banco : Oh, indeed Jan. That's what it historically meant here too, and was used as a term of abuse - "You ass" meant "you idiot" when meaning a donkey just a
34 PROSA : re: American use of "arse" as a mild euphemism Really? that's interesting PROSA, because people here use "ass" instead of "arse" for exactly the same
35 Kellmark : Although I am American, I admire the English spoken by the Brits. My "favourite" is "humped zebra crossing".
36 AA7771stClass : So my question regards the use of verbs in the States vs. the U.K. I've never understood why but it never fails that our fellow speakers across the oc
37 Post contains images Whitehatter : I always find American use of the word "fanny" to be amusing. To them it's someone's rear end, to us it's something an awful lot ruder (same area, thi
38 Post contains images Worldoftui : I always find American use of the word "fanny" to be amusing. To them it's someone's rear end, to us it's something an awful lot ruder (same area, thi
39 Skyway1 : It's funny.....when I lived in Wisconsin the folks up there called water fountains 'bubblers'. I had a professor that was from the hills of North Caro
40 LH423 : Re: Fanny pack. Working for a British company I was up at the gate one evening when someone turned in a fanny pack. I started making announcement rega
41 Post contains images Banco : Well, that particular confusion caused an incident when filming a movie. The American director asked Richard Burton to grab Elizabeth Taylor's fanny;
42 StarCruiser : When considering the differences in other languages I am very grateful to be an English speaker. While it is true there are some regional differences
43 PROSA : In the case of the British as well as the Americans, to say nothing of our Australian and South African friends, the uneducated are always difficult t
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
British English/American English posted Sat Feb 18 2006 23:07:57 by NWOrientDC10
Latino Vs American Company Culture? posted Thu Jul 21 2005 17:33:05 by MaverickM11
American English Vs. British English posted Tue Feb 17 2004 02:15:12 by DFWLandingPath
English Premier League Vs. US MLS posted Mon Sep 19 2005 18:08:58 by NUair
British/American English posted Sat May 4 2002 22:18:28 by Arsenal@LHR
English Language Question posted Wed Dec 6 2006 12:45:48 by TurkishWings
What Does The English (scottish) Word Haver Mean posted Tue Dec 5 2006 21:05:59 by BR076
Reason To Learn Some English (movie) posted Wed Nov 22 2006 18:49:02 by BR076
Al Jazeera English Launches posted Wed Nov 15 2006 16:58:42 by GSM763
Al Jazeera Sets English Launch Date posted Fri Nov 3 2006 14:57:40 by Cedars747