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Great Britain Or United Kingdom?  
User currently offlineTravelin man From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3415 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1760 times:

OK, I need to get this straight: Is it Great Britain or United Kingdom? I know at the Olympics its "GBR", and the British call themselves the "British" for a reason. But at my work we call it the "UK", and have hotels in the "UK".

What's the difference? I don't consider myself a stupid person, but I am confused by what to call your country. (I was in London for the past five days by the way, and I didn't think to ask anyone. Oh well.)

41 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1751 times:

I think "Great Britain" is the more common, popular usage. Why? Don't really know. Many just call it "England" as well. I interchange all 3, actually.

United Kingdom (more formal sounding, maybe the reason...?) is the correct term, as it represents the unity of all four kingdoms: Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. For those not in the know, the "Union Jack" is comprised of the flags of each kingdom, and when put together, you get the Union Jack.

Jolly good!  Big grin


User currently offlineTravelin man From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3415 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1747 times:

Well, I know that there are four countries that make up GBR/UK -- England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. I thought maybe it used to be called UK, and its changed to Great Britain because it's no longer a "Kingdom". But then I am confused as to why it is still called UK as in "FCUK".

User currently offlineJAL777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1744 times:

Great Britain is the name of the island where the countries of England, Scotland, and Wales are located.

United Kingdom is the name of the entire nation including Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales) and Northern Ireland. I'm guessing United Kingdom also used to include all the British colonies in the past (e.g. Hong Kong).


User currently offlineTravelin man From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3415 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1736 times:

So does that mean Northern Ireland has no Olympians, since the team is referred to as "Great Britain"? I suppose when the Brits wake up they'll clear this up...

User currently offlineBristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2270 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 1697 times:

'Great Britain' refers to England, Scotland & Wales. 'United Kingdom' refers to those three and N Ireland.

Hence on the front of the Passport: 'United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'.

BF



Fortune favours the brave
User currently offlineWindowSeat From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1311 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1686 times:


I think "Great Britain" is the more common, popular usage. Why? Don't really know. Many just call it "England" as well. I interchange all 3, actually.

Uh-huh. Try saying you're in England when you're in Glasgow or Edinburgh!


cheers







I'm all in favour of keeping dangerous weapons out of the hands of fools. Let's start with keyboards.
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1684 times:

WindowSeat: Since I already identified in my earlier thread that I know the four individual kingdoms that make up UK, I'm also smart enough to know not to refer to Scotland or Wales or N. Ireland as just "England". Give me a little credit, ok?  Insane I was in Scotland a month ago, and didn't have any problems...I knew where I was.





User currently offlineJasepl From India, joined Jul 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 40
Reply 8, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1669 times:

Great Britain = England, Scotland and Wales
United Kingdom = Great Britain + Northern Ireland

(Neither of these groupings include the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man.)

For those not in the know, the "Union Jack" is comprised of the flags of each kingdom, and when put together, you get the Union Jack

Actually, it's 3 flags that are combined: England, Scotland and Ireland. Wales never was and isn't today a kingdom. It is a principality.

I'm guessing United Kingdom also used to include all the British colonies in the past (e.g. Hong Kong).

The United Kingdom never included anything more than Great Britain and Ireland (in both united and divided form). All the other Crowns have always been separate, though vested in the same sovereign. The colonies collectively were the Empire and now the Commonwealth.

And yes, it can get very confusing, especially when sport is involved, because, depending on the sport, they send separate teams or a common one. But never a team for the "United Kingdom".


User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24811 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1658 times:

"Don't really know. Many just call it "England" as well. I interchange all 3, actually."

Not a good idea to say your in England when your actually up here in Scotland  Big grin



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineDuke From Canada, joined Sep 1999, 1155 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1650 times:

So:

Official name of the state: The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (aren't the Channel Islands and Mann part of this?)

Shortened forms of the name fore everyday use: The United Kingdom, The UK, Great Britain, GBR, GB, Britain

The names of the 4 constituent countries/provinces/whatever (in alphabetical order): England, Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland. NEVER call the country as a whole England, that's just plain wrong.


User currently offlineGman94 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 1239 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1645 times:

I think most Brits either use Great Britain, Britain, England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland to describe where their from. Most people outside of Britain seem to use the UK or England to describe Britain which pisses of those Brits that aren't English.

I remember when I first put my details into a form on the internet and looking for Great Britain in the country list but it wasn't there, I then looked for England and that wasn't there either. After much scratching of my head I realised we were listed as the United Kingdom which I found very strange as I had never called my country by that name.



British Airways - The Way To Fly
User currently offlineToddy333 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 81 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1640 times:

just out of interest, when i am abroad and people ask me where im from i either say england or the UK, i dont know why i dont say britiain!

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 13, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1638 times:

You know, this came up as a question on the radio the other day, as to why we enter the Olympics as Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the last bit seems to get lopped off) rather than as the UK.

Apparently, the reason is that the United Kingdom is the political entity, defined solely by the four constituent countries. By using the Great Britain tag, we can effectively be "Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands, Gibraltar and the Isle of Man". Those islands are not part of the UK, and would otherwise be excluded from our team.

Case solved.  Big grin




She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCragley From Australia, joined Jul 2004, 426 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1621 times:



All you need to remember is Scotland  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Everything else is London.

Unless its the olympics and if you are living in england or from england, then you are called english. But if you are from Wales or Scotland, then you are British.

GRRRRR!



User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 15, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 1613 times:

A lot of Scots say that, Cragley. It's the biggest load of crap you could ever hear. I've looked at the press for Kelly Holmes and the only ones to say she's English are American papers, everyone else refers to her as British. No-one ever said Seb Coe was English, or Steve Ovett, or Denise Lewis or anyone else.

That's the one thing about the Scottish chip on their shoulders that really pisses me off (most of it just makes me smile). It just isn't true and is evident of a ridiculous persecution complex. They're competing for the British team, end of story.

The only ones to ever break it down further are the Scots. So, the curling team are Scottish not British. You never, NEVER hear the English claim all the other medal winners as English, it just doesn't enter into it. Grow up.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineMas777 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 1999, 2935 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1554 times:

Frankly some of the answers here are shocking!!!

User currently offlineTiger119 From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1919 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 1510 times:

"..........For those not in the know, the "Union Jack" is comprised of the flags of each kingdom, and when put together, you get the Union Jack."

- I would love to see a break down of the flags of the UK (the flags of Wales, Scotland, the flag of the Royal Family, etc). At sporting events (IE: The Open, Wimbledon, etc) for example, we occasionally see the Union Jack in the crowds and galleries and occasionally see a white flag with two red stripes, one vertical and one horizontal being waved by fans.

" I'm guessing United Kingdom also used to include all the British colonies in the past (e.g. Hong Kong)."

- What about the UK Virgin Islands, Bermuda and other islands in the Atlantic Ocean that still have ties to The UK?



Flying is the second greatest thrill known to mankind, landing is the first!
User currently offlineVc10 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2001, 1397 posts, RR: 16
Reply 18, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1504 times:

Tiger

You will find no inclusion of the Welsh flag in the union flag,as Wales was a conquered nation by the 13 th century.

I was told that the name United Kingdom was adopted at he end of WW2 so that the representaives of Britain would sit near the USA and USSR. Makes you look more powerfull than sitting next to Brazil or Botswanna etc


User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24811 posts, RR: 56
Reply 19, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 1492 times:

Banco, I'll agree with you to an extent. However a lot of the media do still say that English atheletes are English and not British (although correct, brings yup a reasonable thing)...should the UK break up football and Scotland, Walesd, England and N.Ireland send individual teams for the Olympics etc
I can guarantee you that the number of medals England win will be less than Scotland  Wink/being sarcastic



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 20, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 1480 times:

...occasionally see a white flag with two red stripes, one vertical and one horizontal being waved by fans.

That's the cross of St George - the flag of England.

Kirkie, the thing is, I think a lot of Scots are hypersensitive, and don't notice when it's the other way around. At various points during the sailing and the cycling, I've heard the commentators say how it's been a good day/event/race for the Scots, and how a Scot has won this or that - and they have, good on 'em! That's fine, I have no problem with it whatsoever; but what really irritates me is how some really chippy people ignore this side of it and just concentrate on English this or that (remember how Colin Jackson was always referred to as the Welsh 110m hurdler?). It works both ways. They're English, Scottish, Northern Irish or Welsh. And they're British. Simple really.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCatatonic From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 1155 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1469 times:

I think "Great Britain" is the more common, popular usage. Why? Don't really know. Many just call it "England" as well. I interchange all 3, actually.

Try calling it all England in Wales or Scotland, Im sure you will learn a hard lesson!

United Kingdom (more formal sounding, maybe the reason...?) is the correct term, as it represents the unity of all four kingdoms: Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and England. For those not in the know, the "Union Jack" is comprised of the flags of each kingdom, and when put together, you get the Union Jack.

The union jack is a load of crap, show me where the welsh dragon is on the union jack? Show me where Wales is represented or the isle of man or Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar, isle of white, Falklands etc etc, its a load of English crap to keep the Scots sweet!!


[Edited 2004-08-27 17:07:36]


Equally Cursed and Blessed.
User currently offlineQANTASFOREVER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1461 times:

I always call it the United Kingdom.

I find it trite when a nation bestows upon itself the title 'Great'.
Not to say the UK isn't a great place, but I see it a little like Fox News calling itself 'Fair and Balanced' - a title that may be true, but if I walked around saying - "Hey, I'm QFF - I'm great" people would think I was the total opposite.

QFF


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1459 times:

I find it trite when a nation bestows upon itself the title 'Great'.
Not to say the UK isn't a great place, but I see it a little like Fox News calling itself 'Fair and Balanced' - a title that may be true, but if I walked around saying - "Hey, I'm QFF - I'm great" people would think I was the total opposite.


A good point; what's so fantastic about Greater Manchester?


User currently offlineFlyLondon From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 1447 times:

I find it trite when a nation bestows upon itself the title 'Great'.

Well seeing as that isn't the title of the nation then you really shouldn't find it trite.

Contrary to what has been posted here, the term Great Britain actually refers to the island on which the majority of England, Wales and Scotland lies. It does not include any of the Scottish Islands or anything other than the island itself, NOT any country or state.


25 Mdsh00 : I find it trite when a nation bestows upon itself the title 'Great' I thought that the "great" referred to physical reach, as in "Greater Los Angeles"
26 GDB : Catatonic, the Welsh uprising failed 600 years ago, get over it, not as if you don't have a flag anyway. Unless you want to be like too many in Northe
27 Travelin man : So, to sum up: Great Britain -- The geographical island upon which sits England, Wales, and Scotland United Kingdom -- The political entity (i.e. the
28 Post contains images Mas777 : Some of the answers above are fantastic - RoFL!!!
29 Post contains images EGGD : I find it trite when a nation bestows upon itself the title 'Great'. Hehe, when I read this I did find it amusing.. After the stick Australians have b
30 Post contains images QANTASFOREVER : EGGD - um, you're kinda stretching the argument a little - don't you think? To what 'over-zealous' support do you refer? I'm not sure exactly where yo
31 Silverfox : Ok the correct answer.... Honest and clarifications Great Britain GEOGRAPHICAL consists of the mainland only of England Wales Scotland United Kingdom
32 Post contains images Andz : The names of the 4 constituent countries/provinces/whatever (in alphabetical order): England, Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland. Duke, I think you'll
33 Tiger119 : "just an aside the media have a funny quirk If a Scottish athlete wins they are British, if they lose suddenly they are Scottish" - In addition to tha
34 Post contains images GKirk : A good point; what's so fantastic about Greater Manchester? Its better than central Manchester?
35 Post contains images TupolevTu154 : The States United States United States Of America America U.S U.S.A Which one is it I wonder? Sorry couldn't resist! TupolevTu154
36 Scotty : There was a church minister on the island of Great Cumbrae who prayed every day for the islands of Great and Little Cumbrae (which are off the coast o
37 Silverfox : Tiger119 The national flag of The UK is the Union Flag Comprising of the Crosses of St George, St Patrick and St Andrew ( the patron saints of England
38 Scotty : The Irish or red saltire in the Union Flag should correctly be removed since it is the flag of 1807-1922 Ireland when it was part of the UK. The cross
39 Post contains images Banco : Most Shetlanders I've met would be less than happy at being described as "part of Scotland", Scotty.
40 Post contains images GKirk : Your correct Banco, besides the Shetlands are nearer Norway anyway There all inbred up in those parts
41 Prebennorholm : Both UK and United Kingdom are abbreviations. The full name of the nation is: The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland And that in fac
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