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Best U.S. Generals Of All Time  
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6945 times:

Since I've been doing some reading on one in this list I'm about to put on, I thought I'd put out the Top 10 Generals in American History.

1. George Washington. For obvious reasons.

2. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Was not a field General, but led the Allied coalition that eventually toppled Hitler's Germany.

3. Ulysses S. Grant. A horrible President, but was the only Union General in the Civil War who believed in pushing the enemy, and never letting them rest.

4. Robert E. Lee. Might be a bit higher, but his horrendous error in taking on George Meade at Gettysburg in the last 2 days of that battle forever hurt his reputation.

5. George Patton. Maybe the best Field General of the modern era. Wouldn't want him around in peace time, but damned if you don't need a Patton during battle.

6. John Pershing. Born just before the Civil War started, but was the force in building up the U.S. forces in WW I. Was an early proponent, ahead of his time, for black soldiers.

7. Omar Bradly. The quiet one, always near the bombastic Patton. Was equally as good in the field.

8. James Longstreet. The best Corp Commnader, in either army, in the American Civil War. He was ahead of his time in fashinoing attacks. The "Lost Cause" fantasy of the Southern Historians after Lee's death damaged his reputation for over 100 years.

9. Stonewall Jackson. Had he lived after Chancelorsville in May, 1863, probably would be in the Top 5. A brilliant strategist, and, like Grant, believed in constantly harrassing the enemy.

11. William T. Sherman. Broke the back of the Confederacy with his March to The Sea in 1864. Despite the fact that southerners hated him, he advocated magnamanous and lienent treatment of the south after the war.

Always fun to argue over things that can't really be proven.  Smile

99 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5628 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6925 times:

I'd probably go with Sherman or Bradley.
Wasn't Patton considered a bit of a show-off?



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6917 times:

He was, but one of the great feats by any U.S. General was done by Patton in the Battle of The Bulge when he beat the Germans at Bastogne. He was a blowhard, but he walked the walk, as well.

User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13967 posts, RR: 63
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6912 times:

Bradley was called the "Soldier´s General" due to his low profile.
Patton´s nick name was "General Blood and Glory,... our blood, his glory" by GIs of WW2.

Jan


User currently offlineNWA742 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6908 times:

Patton was great.

I love one of his quotes

"I'd rather have a German army in front of me than a French army behind me."

 Laugh out loud

How could you not like a guy like that LOL



-NWA742


User currently offlineGarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5360 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 6905 times:

Jan - my father (to stem off any accusations that I'm lying, I was adopted by my maternal grandparents and, as such, consider them my mother and father) served with both Patton and Bradley. He absolutely adored both of them. Patton may have had unconventional ways and may have been rather bombastic, but many of his soldiers respected him and, indeed, there have been quite a few books written for those in business on how to adapt his managerial style to an office environment. Oddly enough he despised Eisenhower and felt him to be more a politican than a general...at any rate, my picks would have to be:

1) Patton
2) Bradley
3) Sherman (Odd for a Southerner to say this I know)
4) Grant
5) Stonewall Jackson
6) Hap Arnold
7) Longstreet
8) Lee
9) Winfield Scott
10) Creighton Abrams



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 6895 times:

Gen. Ambrose Burnside



Gen. George McClellan



Adm. Husband E. Kimmel



Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineArrow From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 2676 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 6891 times:
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You guys forgot Benedict Arnold.


Never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 8, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 6883 times:

Confucious, I take it yours is a parody list?

Anyway my top picks.

George Washington
Ulysses S. Grant
Robert E. Lee
George Patton
Omar Bradly
Stonewall Jackson.
William T. Sherman
Mathew Ridgeway
Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller
Anthony McAuliffe



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineCommander_Rabb From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 771 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6877 times:

As a Naval officer (reserves), I am astounded that Admiral Husband E. Kimmel is mentioned. His role if you could call it one was minimal as that of an innocent bystander. Both he and General Short should be exonerated from their "role" on 7 December , 1941.

Generals? Well, Washington of course. But if you ask about Admirals, Chester Nimitz is without doubt, the pinnacle of naval leaders.

From an Ensign who ran his ship a ground to a 5 star Fleet Admiral, his story is most incredible. That would certainly not happen in today's unforgiving Navy.




This is one of my favorite photos that hangs in the hallway leading to my office. It shows the strain of war yet the confidence of near and certain victory.

Anchors Away!


User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2770 posts, RR: 18
Reply 10, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6871 times:

Yeah Admiral Kimmel!! jk.

I think Nimitz was pretty good,

How about General MacArthur who lead the assault on Red/Yellow/Blue beaches of Incheon in Korean War?



Chance favors the prepared mind.
User currently offlineKalakaua From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1516 posts, RR: 5
Reply 11, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6859 times:

Don't forget Gen. MacArthur! He led the Pacific Theater.

"I SHALL RETURN!"



Gravity explains the motions of the planets, but it cannot explain who set the planets in motion.
User currently offlineCopaair737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 6862 times:

I would have to say, my ancestor, General Pershing, was one of them. He was a great general during WWI. Along with Pershing, General Erwin Rommel of Germany was one of my ancestors too. Maybe I should become a military leader.

-Copa


User currently offlineBN747 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5613 posts, RR: 51
Reply 13, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 6855 times:

You guys forgot Benedict Arnold.

Hey take it easy... Benedict was actually a brilliant officer and great guy who just happen succumbed to the one thing that has brought down many a great people. A piece of ass (loyalist) that he could not resist. Obviously, it wasn't worth it.

As Brilliant as Lee, Jackson and Longstreet were... there were not American Generals.. they were the enemy of the United States of America and certainly belong within the ranks of Benedict Arnold in the worse way.

BN747



"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
User currently offlineMxCtrlr From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 2485 posts, RR: 35
Reply 14, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 6853 times:

Don't forget Gen. MacArthur! He led the Pacific Theater.

"I SHALL RETURN!"


My father-in-law was left behind in the Pacific when MacArthur pulled out. He took the food stores with him and left the Marines behind to fend for themselves. His "historic" photo of his promised "Return to the Philippines" was scripted at best, since the island had been long secured well in advance of his pompous "return".

MacArthur was a blow-hard PR General. Eisenhower was a master tactician as was Nimitz (Eisenhower's counterpart with the Navy in the Pacific).



DAMN! This SUCKS! I just had to go to the next higher age bracket in my profile! :-(
User currently offlineGarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5360 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 6845 times:

As Brilliant as Lee, Jackson and Longstreet

1) Believe it or not, Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet had rather distinguished careers in that little war prior to the CIvil War - the Mexican-American War.
2) Funny, the US Army would disagree with you. Go onto Fort Jackson and you'll see streets named after Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, and a few other Confederates.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineBN747 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5613 posts, RR: 51
Reply 16, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 6836 times:

True Garnetpalmetto, not only that, many bases are named after Confederate Generals (so are schools and buildings). But all this came in the wake of the 'Lost Cause' campaign to rehabilitate/justify the 'Southern' image.

But their noteworthiness comes from the Civil War where they were generals.. not the previous battles. In making their claims about the civil war.. you might as well toss Rommel in the too.


BN747



"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 6824 times:

What did you Americans think of General Norman Shwarzzkopf (hope name is spelled correct)?


[edit post]
User currently offlineKROC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 6819 times:

A few that haven't been mentioned yet.

Henry H (Hap) Arnold
William F. (Bull) Halsey
Lewis Burwell (Chesty) Puller


User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 6814 times:

Well, I wasn't including Admirals in my list-I was focusing simply on Army Generals.

And while I've been known to share the sentiment above abot Lee, Longstreet and others, who turned Rebel, the DID have fine careers in the U.S. antebellum Army, and they WERE Americans when they fought in the Civil War.

Someone mentioned McCarthur-maybe the most over-rated General we ever had. He was out for himself; abandoned his troops on the Philippines, and later sullied his reputation when he got into politics and showed himself to be a lunatic.

As for Schwarzkopf, I don't think a General who "led" a 2-month war deserves mention among the greats.

The most under-rated and under-appreciated? Longstreet. The best Corps Commander in the Civil War, and made a scapegoat by revisionist southerners after Lee's death.


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 6809 times:

After viewing this site I would give my vote to Henry H.(Hap) for being the only 2 times 5 star general ,once in the Army and once in the Air Force.
http://www2.powercom.net/~rokats/generals.html/

P.S. If link doesn't work just GooGle for american generals

[Edited 2004-09-29 13:30:06]


[edit post]
User currently offlineJRadier From Netherlands, joined Sep 2004, 4670 posts, RR: 50
Reply 21, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6787 times:

I've got another list then most of you, for me the best U.S. generals of all time are in no particular order:

General Dynamics
General Motors
General Electric



For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and ther
User currently offlineFDXmech From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3251 posts, RR: 35
Reply 22, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6785 times:

>>>As Brilliant as Lee, Jackson and Longstreet were... there were not American Generals.. they were the enemy of the United States of America and certainly belong within the ranks of Benedict Arnold in the worse way.<<<

Interestingly, Gen. Lee was Lincolns first choice to lead the Union Army against the Confederacy. Unfortunately his allegience to Virginia prevented him from taking that position.

On the polar extreme of Lee was Burnside, the namesake of...........you guessed it............the "Sideburn".

[Edited 2004-09-29 16:29:33]


You're only as good as your last departure.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13967 posts, RR: 63
Reply 23, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6778 times:

Any opinions about General Westmoreland of Vietnam fame?

Jan


User currently offlineGarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5360 posts, RR: 53
Reply 24, posted (9 years 9 months 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6774 times:

I'll agree that while Longstreet was under-rated, I'd say even more under-rated was Winfield Scott. The man played a pivotal role in 3 wars, helped bring an end to the Aroostook War, and most importantly, defined the strategy that eventually won the Civil War with his Anaconda Plan.

Also underrated, the Swamp Fox, General Francis Marion, who was one of the pioneers of guerilla warfare using irregulars against a larger, better-equipped regular force.

The only one people cite who I'd absolutely have to disagree with is Washington. During his ordered instigation of the French and Indian War, his Fort Necessity was a poorly conceived disgrace, considering Washington was a surveyor. During the Revolutionary War, his only major victories came as a result of his enemy's gross incompetence (aided at the Battle of Trenton by their drunkenness). Washington, like Eisenhower, was a great political general, but a miserable field officer.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
25 Slider : In the history of warfare, there is no general that liberated more people, covered more ground and killed more of the enemy than General George S. Pat
26 MD-90 : How can anyone place Grant above Lee? Or mention Sherman at all? Sherman's army, with his express permission, raped, pillaged, and plundered the south
27 Post contains images KROC : MD-90. Put away your Rebel Flag bro. The Civil war is long over. Don't hate Sherman cause he was the first to say "The roof, the roof, the roof is on
28 FDXmech : >>I also respect Forrest, although he wasn't a general, of course.
29 MD11Engineer : Another one: Brigadier Lucius D. Clay He singlehandedly organised the Berlin Airlift in 1948. Jan
30 FDXmech : But to me the man who actually made the Berlin Airlift successful was General William Tunner. An organizational genius. He transformed the airlift to
31 Falcon84 : Do you mean Nathan Bedford Forrest? He went from Private in 1861 to Brig. General in 1862 then eventually Lt General. The only man on either side to d
32 MD-90 : Oops, he was a general. All I could remember was the Lt. part. But the Federals, to their credit, built up a Calvary that, by the wars' end, was equal
33 Garnetpalmetto : I'd highly recommend "Patton on Leadership" edited by Alan Axelrod. THAT's the one I was thinking about, Slider! Excellent book How can anyone place G
34 FDXmech : General Grant was so tenacious in engaging the Rebels, taking huge losses. That he was hated by none other than, Mrs Lincoln, calling him a "butcher".
35 Goose : General Curtis LeMay, USAAF & USAF. Chief of the B-29 bombing campaign in the Pacific, against Japan. Directed the firebombing campaigns against Tokyo
36 PPGMD : Bradley was a good general but he wasn't the best general for going against Monty during WWII. IMO I think that there would have possibly been less sc
37 Post contains images Falcon84 : Garnettpalmetto, that last post put you on my respected list. Excellent post! Well done. And LeMay was the father of the modern Air Force, no doubt, b
38 KROC : Get off my man LeMay Falcon, lol. And I agree, even before I got down to this post, Garnettpalmetto was added to my RR list. Well done bro.
39 Post contains images Falcon84 : KROC, a spade is a spade, and a nut is a nut, bro.
40 PPGMD : The movie Patton is *fairly* accurate, but there is so much more written about and by the man that portrays him more accurately, I'd recommend reading
41 Falcon84 : I saw someone above put the picture of Ambrose Burnside. Give me a break!! He was a disaster as head of the Army of the Potomac, although he did do a
42 Goose : And LeMay was the father of the modern Air Force, no doubt, but he was the nut who tried to push us into a nuclear exchange with the Russians in the C
43 FDXmech : >>>Hooker, Burnside, McLellan, Pope-none of them had a clue.
44 Na : Referring to Grant and Sherman, the two top generals who crushed the confederacy: True is that both were the only Union generals who actually had a pl
45 MD-90 : As for your contention that his soldiers were ordered to pillage, I say mularkey. His soldiers were under standing orders not to, but as occurs with c
46 Garnetpalmetto : True is that both were the only Union generals who actually had a plan how to do it And again, the plan belonged to Winfield Scott. Though it could be
47 MD-90 : Here's one for Garnetpalmetto: On February 17, 1865, General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Union Troops completed the long march from Savannah and reac
48 Garnetpalmetto : Judge a man by his actions, not his words. In that case, let's castigate General Forrest for his actions in the Massacre Fort Pillow as well. Also if
49 BN747 : And while I've been known to share the sentiment above abot Lee, Longstreet and others, who turned Rebel, the DID have fine careers in the U.S. antebe
50 Dl021 : BN, Actually Lee manumitted his own slaves prior to the war. Forrest was a practicioner of Shermans type warfare when possible, but mastered guerrilla
51 Garnetpalmetto : Dl021, we've disagreed on many things, but I'll agree with you on Vinegar Joe Stilwell. The man was a scholar, a tactician, an engineer, and a prankst
52 Dl021 : GP We probably just interact on the stuff where we disagree, because this is not the first time we are in sync. Gen.Stilwell supposedly had another ni
53 Post contains links Falcon84 : MD-90, somehow, I missed the link on the article I wanted you to read. It discusses you, to be honest-one who believes in the "Lost Cause" nonsense. h
54 Garnetpalmetto : GP We probably just interact on the stuff where we disagree, because this is not the first time we are in sync. Gen.Stilwell supposedly had another ni
55 USAFHummer : "Bradley was called the "Soldier´s General" due to his low profile." I've also heard the term "G.I's General used to describe him... As a matter of f
56 PPGMD : "Bradley was called the "Soldier´s General" due to his low profile." I've also heard the term "G.I's General used to describe him... Actually it was
57 Post contains links and images MD11Engineer : Stars and Stripes cartoonist Bill Mauldin (BTW died last year) also described having problems with Patton because his cartoons (esp. the Willy and Joe
58 Dl021 : GP Yeah, Gen Ridgway, a good paratrooper, deserves mention. According to what I've read a LTC {Col. VanDerPool?} is the one who went to SE ASia to con
59 MD11Engineer : DI021, Even though Mauldin worked as a cartoonist, he WAS a frontline soldier himself for a while, so he knew how the guys were living. Also many WW2
60 Dl021 : Jan...No question about Mauldins accuracy and first hand knowledge. Just pointing out the whys to go along with the wherefores. The class distinctions
61 Slider : Garnetpalmetto--I really appreciate reading your Civil War insights; it is one era which I am not well versed about so I really enjoy hearing more of
62 EA CO AS : If anyone is still interested in discussing great Navy men, I'd nominate Admiral Hyman Rickover as well. He was a pioneer of nuclear marine propulsion
63 Post contains links Garnetpalmetto : I'll definitely agree with Rickover, EA. The fact that he was Director of Naval Reactors and his handpicking of every officer that would step foot abo
64 PPGMD : You mean the general that couldn't defeat a regiment with almost 2 divisions of forces. The general that was predicted that took nearly 20 times more
65 MD11Engineer : I was responding to RJpieces question and I was thinking about Giap´s performance at Dien Bienh Phu. Jan
66 L-188 : I think we could also in this discussions differentiate between administrative generals and battlefield ones. Just because one was great in one area,
67 Dl021 : OK the last two posts lost me. PPGMD who are you speaking about in your first sentence? Jan...when were you speaking of Giap? He would make it on an i
68 MD11Engineer : Also the French confined themselves to the roads through excessive use of armour, while the Vietminh were using the jungle. Jan
69 Falcon84 : If anyone is still interested in discussing great Navy men, I'd nominate Admiral Hyman Rickover as well. How about one of the unsung heroes of WWII in
70 Dl021 : The French allowed themselves to be confined because they were still trying to fight WWII as they would in Europe instead of seeking to understand wha
71 Falcon84 : The French allowed themselves to be confined because they were still trying to fight WWII as they would in Europe instead of seeking to understand wha
72 PROSA : That's a typical problem in any war. At the beginning of most conflict, at least, you're fighting the last war, not the present one. In the Civil War,
73 Garnetpalmetto : Or in World War II, when the Poles were trying to fight off Panzer units using horse cavalry. Granted, regular Wehrmacht units weren't in much better
74 Post contains links Dl021 : The pattern was broken in the '80s when the AirLand battle doctrine was delivered and implemented. It was the first time since Clausewitz that a moder
75 Captoveur : "You guys forgot Benedict Arnold." If the war had ended 6 months earlier he would have been remembered as a Hero.
76 Na : Bedford Forrest here among the best? Give me a break! He might have been very successful as small army (guerilla) leader, but, to make it clear, this
77 Falcon84 : Bedford Forrest here among the best? Give me a break! He might have been very successful as small army (guerilla) leader, but, to make it clear, this
78 Iakobos : For the sake of precision: Brigadier Anthony Mac Auliffe was commanding the artillery of the 101st airborne (the screaming eagles), the CO was Maxwell
79 Na : Of cause you´re right Falcon, but even so, Forrest cannot be counted among the best Generals as he never fought decisive actions. He never fled impor
80 Falcon84 : Point taken, Na, but in the Civil War, the Calvary, as it was constituted then, was not only the "eyes and ears" of the Army group, but was important
81 Na : I agree that there was no cavalry commander better than Forrest, but "best general" should be restricted to men who were in a position to win a major
82 Post contains links Dl021 : NA An effective commander is defined as one who defeats the enemy, or forces the enemy to change their plans in a way they did not want to do. Forrest
83 Iakobos : I reiterate, Mc Auliffe and W. Roberts shared the command until 21 Dec 44 at 00:01. From that minute, Mc Auliffe became the CO of all troops in the po
84 Dl021 : Iakabos..You are correct in that. I misremembered the order of events and reversed them. Gen MacAuliffe did say Aww Nuts, and Kinnard said why not jus
85 MD11Engineer : I´ve heard about a black supply truck driver who got cut off from his unit by the German offensive and got kind of adopted by the 101st ABN. Since he
86 Iakobos : Jan, There were two "black" units in Bastogne, 333 and 969 (155 howitzer) field artillery bataillons, though they were not organic to the 101st airbor
87 Dl021 : Iakabos...Well that makes sense then. Once a unified command is in place there is no question of what one man is in command. Up until that time every
88 Iakobos : With Patton troops I dont know, but not in Bastogne.(705th Bn minus 1 platoon, and staff of C Co 609 Bn) nb: it is iakobos (equivalent to Jacob/James)
89 Dl021 : Iakobos....Pardon for the name error. I will try to write it correctly henceforth. Ian
90 Slider : Unless I'm mistaken, the 3rd Army under Patton was integrated...there weren't separate combat units for blacks. Non-infantry units were still segregat
91 Post contains links Dl021 : Slider...Dude, Patton had black troops in his units. There is a book out (Brothers in Arms by Kareem Abdul Jabbar, about his fathers experience as wel
92 Pelican : What about F.W. von Steuben? Any thoughts? pelican
93 Post contains images MD11Engineer : Concerning the kidnapped black NCO, I like Patton´s reaction! Jan
94 Dl021 : von Steuben and Casimir Pulaski were two of the finest examples in US history of mercenary/expatriate officers. von Steuben truly professionalized our
95 Post contains images Confuscius : Brig. General Janice Karpinski
96 Garnetpalmetto : Confuscius - this is on the Best US Generals of All Time. Not the worst. If so, George McLellan, George Custer, and a few more need to be up there nex
97 Confuscius : Custer was pretty good until he met Sitting Bull. Do indian chiefs count? How 'bout Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce. "Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired. My
98 L-188 : Ironically, Patton was somewhat racist, but knew that in war, those boundaries were transcended He was to an extent, but in many ways no worse then a
99 NWA : "Someone mentioned McCarthur-maybe the most over-rated General we ever had. He was out for himself; abandoned his troops on the Philippines, and later
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