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How Much To Tip In The USA?  
User currently offlineAMS From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 1691 posts, RR: 11
Posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2458 times:

My question is how much to tip Taxi drivers, Hotel Bell staff, and Airport shuttle drivers?. Can anyone give me a detailed view about the above?

Thank You

Regards,
AMS

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2447 times:

Hi AMS: It sort of depends on how long the ride is for taxi/shuttle drivers. If the bill is $10, a $2 tip is probably OK, if it is $25, I usually give them $5. 20% of the bill is usually a good benchmark (that's fairly generous, but I tend to help these guys out if they are good). 15% would be fine too. As far as bellhops go, I usually carry my own stuff; mainly because I am able, and I see no reason to pay someone to do what I can do myself. But, if a bellhop does carry your bags upstairs, probably $2-$5 is appropriate. Again, don't let them bully you; if you can do it yourself, do it, and politely say, "No Thanks, I can get them myself."

Logan


User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16245 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2436 times:

Whatever you feel like. Usually 10-15% for avg service. 20-25% for good service. Nothing or a shiny nickel for bad service.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineUSAFHummer From United States of America, joined May 2000, 10685 posts, RR: 53
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2423 times:

15% is fairly standard for most things in the US, but as always, you can give more for excellent service and less if you are displeased with the service being provided...

Greg



Chief A.net college football stadium self-pic guru
User currently offlineThecoz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2411 times:

It all depends on the service. If they are blatently rude, tip nothing. If they provide you the service and they are relatively professional, 10-15%. If they do a great job, 20%-25%. I tend to tip very well myself. That's just my personal preference.

If I go to the bar to get a drink, I tip a dollar per drink usually. I tip taxi drivers about the same as I would tip a waiter, 15-25%. I don't know what to tip bell staff.

Many Americans are beginning to get sick of seeing tip jars everywhere. Once, when I went to a night club here in Phoenix, the girl collecting the money had a tip jar. now, WTF is up with that? I'm gonna tip her for taking my money? hardly. I felt like giving her a good knock upside the back of her head.

Here's another example, why does Starbucks have a tip jar? I mean, we already pay 4-5 dollars per coffee. Sorry, I felt some ranting was necessary  Smile

Bottom line, if there's a tip jar there, don't feel obligated to tip if you don't want to.


User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 962 posts, RR: 51
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2405 times:

Standard tip is almost always 15%


Of course you can tip more or less depending on how you enjoyed your meal and service, but 15% is just a good rule of thumb. There is also a very easy way to calculate it-

Take the amount, move the decimal point once to the left, divide this number by 2 and then add it to the original. This equals 15%. Example-

Bill = $43.00

Move decimal point = $4.30
Divide by two = $2.15
Add = $6.45

6.45/43 = 15%  Big thumbs up


User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5632 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2399 times:

Many Americans are beginning to get sick of seeing tip jars everywhere. Once, when I went to a night club here in Phoenix, the girl collecting the money had a tip jar. now, WTF is up with that? I'm gonna tip her for taking my money? hardly. I felt like giving her a good knock upside the back of her head.
Here's another example, why does Starbucks have a tip jar? I mean, we already pay 4-5 dollars per coffee.


Tip jars can be a useful way of getting rid of excess small change. For instance, my Starbucks order is $4.82, I pay with a $5 bill, and toss the 12 cents into the tip jar rather than add to the already too large bunch of coins in my pocket. The ubiquitous charity-collection cans at 7-11's and similar places serve the same purpose.



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineThecoz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2393 times:

I think the penny trays are great too.

But if you were to take your change home and collect it for a while, you'd be amazed at how much extraneous cash that is spent.

I have a box of change that's too heavy to pick up. I've head it for a couple of years so far.

That reminds me, anyone here in favor of getting rid of the penny?


User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2391 times:

Thecoz: LMFAO, I know what you mean. Getting a tip for taking your money. LMAYFC (e-mail me if you want the definition, but you can figure it out). PROSA is right, too. Tibits of change are f-ing ridiculous. Quarters should be the lowest denomination. Thinkk of how much money retailers and the gov't could make. When was the last time that $19.99 made you feel that you were paying less than $20.00? WTF, that penny could go somewhere important!

Logan


User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4124 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2379 times:

Dfw,

If I'm at a sit-in restaurant, I usually just look at the amount that I was taxed. Since most sales taxes in CA are aroun 7.75-8.25%, I usually just double that and add it to the total...plus a bit more.



"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineJ_hallgren From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1507 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2376 times:

There are times when having the penny makes "cents"! Such as at hardware store...I can buy the 10 screws I need at 7 cents apiece..total = $.70...If we did away with penny, and switched to nickel as smallest, they would charge 10 cents each...thus it would be $1...which would be almost 50% more...I know they say it would average out in long run...but I think it would increase prices...


COBOL - Not a dead language yet!
User currently offlineN317AS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 2372 times:

Here is a link to tipping questions (not cows). It covers cruise ships, bellhops, taxiis. Scroll down and it gets into the whos and wheres.

http://www.findalink.net/tippingetiquette.php


User currently offlineIFLYMCO From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 482 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 2361 times:

AMS- I have a reverse question for you...

I've heard that in the Netherlands tipping is rare,is that true? Are there any exceptions? Taxi, Hotel, Waiter/Waitress?



Now it should be "IFLYDCA"
User currently offlineJAXpax From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2346 times:

But if you were to take your change home and collect it for a while, you'd be amazed at how much extraneous cash that is spent.

I typically use my debit card or credit card for just about everything to collect points/miles (I track the use of the credit card like I would a bank account and always pay it off in full), but just from the cash expenditures I have, I average about $30-35 in coins a month. It adds up.


User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2321 times:

I recently had an American scold me for tipping in Slovenia. He said that tipping is not customary and there is no sense starting.

Years ago on a trip to the Yucatan region of Mexico I had similar advice from an American who told me I was "spoiling it for everyone" for tipping a taxi driver with the equivalent of about $1 US on a $4 cab ride.

So now when I visit the US, I follow his advise.


User currently offlineAirKas1 From Netherlands, joined Dec 2003, 3971 posts, RR: 55
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2315 times:

Hey Patrick,

Hope you don't mind me giving an answer to your question Smile

Here in Holland we don't tip like you do in the US. But there are of course the the known things, like a restaurant or hotel.

From my experience, in a restaurant (with good service/food) you tip some euros, I don't know of a percentage. But if your bill is about €45, and the service/food was good, you give them €50 and tell them to leave the change (in Dutch: Is goed zo.. Big grin Big thumbs up).

For a hotel I don't know, because when I'm in a hotel it's always abroad Smile/happy/getting dizzy

But we do tip, just not that often. It depends on the situation.

Hope this answered your question a bit.

Kas


User currently offlineFoxBravo From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 2993 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2306 times:

For our foreign friends visiting the U.S., one thing to keep in mind is that the pay scale in restaurants here takes tips into account. Waiters, waitresses, bartenders, etc. are paid under the assumption that they will receive 15-20% tips from customers. Therefore, they depend on tips to make a living. In many other countries, by contrast, the pay scales tend to be a bit higher since tips are much more variable, thus your waiter or waitress won't starve if you don't leave much of a tip. That may help put things in perspective.

As for exact numbers, in restaurants 15% is sort of the minimum under normal circumstances--I think in New York, at least, most people give a bit more. Exactly 15% is still perfectly acceptable, but you should only give less than that if the service is particularly poor and you want to convey your dissatisfaction to the staff. As others have suggested, I usually double the sales tax (8.625%) and then round up a bit, which is quite easy (even after a few drinks...) and works out to 17-18%, which is generally about right. Note, in case it wasn't clear, that you should calculate the tip based on the pre-tax total!

Anyway, back to the original question: for bellhops, if they carry your bags, $1-2 per bag is fine. For taxis and airport shuttles, approximately 15%, rounded up to the nearest dollar. Again, as others have pointed out, feel free to give more or less depending on politeness, driving skills, etc. Occasionally in NY I get a cab driver whose heavy-footedness on the gas and/or brakes leaves me fearing for my life and/or nauseous. In those cases I definitely give less of a tip! On the other hand, sometimes I get a great cab driver who knows shortcuts to avoid traffic, or just a nice guy who is chatting about his family back in Bangladesh, and in those cases I'll give a little more.



Common sense is not so common. -Voltaire
User currently offlineRedDragon From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2004, 1135 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 2284 times:

Regarding tipping in the UK, I think we're probably common with much of Western Europe: it's customary to tip in a restaurant, for example (and 10% is seen here as a benchmark figure), but unnecessary to tip a barman (unless you're in a swanky hotel bar perhaps?), and generally not for a taxi driver, unless you let them "keep the change".

One thing I don't understand about the American tipping culture: "if the service is particularly poor and you want to convey your dissatisfaction to the staff", you still tip, just less. If I received rubbish service in a restaurant, or was in the States and had a hellishly scary taxi ride, I just wouldn't leave a tip at all - or otherwise just give them a shiny nickel. That makes the point far more than "only" leaving 10%, at least from a European point of view!

Rich


User currently offlineAa61hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 18, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2268 times:

I'm a good tipper- here is my scale.

Under $10 bill, 2 bucks
20-30 buck bill, Ill give 5-8 bucks depening on service
30-50, Ill tip them 15-20 depending on service
50-100 bill Ill tip them 20-30.
100+ around 45-50 buck tip

If I'm treated like crap, they get a mediocre tip, if they are good to me, I'm good to them.
---

Don't ask JCS how to tip, he tipped $0 for a 35 dollar bill.



Go big or go home
User currently offlineBOEING747-700 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2264 times:

I don't blame Josh one bit on that TIP, she was a bitch, though she got a tip, when she added to his VISA bill a nice 100 bucks for herself.

User currently offlineJuanr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2244 times:

I do not understand why do you have to tip the taxi driver; a year ago, my father and I were taken from Manhattan to JFK in a cab at 5:00am ...the guy was kind of rude since we kept speaking in Spanish all the time (my father does not speak English). It was a 30 minutes ride and the bill was 32 dollars (we did not crossed through any toll); we gave him 35 dolars and he got mad at us. For God sake, it was a rainy morning and we didn't even got out of his car and helped us with the baggage, did he expected more?

Anyway, I do not tip taxi drivers, not here, not anywhere, waitresses are different, always tip them with at least 10%.

Juan
SKBO


User currently offlineCwapilot From United States of America, joined May 2000, 1166 posts, RR: 17
Reply 21, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2234 times:

Way to stick it to 'em, Airplay! Fight the Power!

15% is generally baseline, usually a little more for the nice folks. I personally hate people who don't tip...these people make very little in actual wages, and depend upon the tips to survive. It would have to be really bad for me not to tip, and it has to be the actual server's fault. If the hostess is nasty, or the cooks screw up, I don't punish the server with rudeness or a lack of a tip.

Cab drivers are a different story. Most are rude SOB's, and milk the meter for all it's worth in the first place. I had one in San Diego start to drive in a direction that would have had us driving the perimeter of the city before getting to our destination...because he thought I had never been there. He then got bitchy when I told him his tip was the extra few miles he had to drive to correct his "mistake" I pointed out to him.



Southside Irish...our two teams are the White Sox and whoever plays the Cubs!
User currently offlineORDflyer From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 511 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2229 times:

For restuarants I usually use a scale of %15-20 and a bit more for great service. I usually go with my instincts with cab drivers...if they were courteous (being able to speak understandable english is a plus!) and got me to my destination in good time (considering traffic conditions) I will give them something extra.

I personally hate people who don't tip
I definitely agree with you! If the service was so horrible that you would contemplate not leaving a tip, please help everybody out by speaking to a manager rather than just leaving no tip without saying anything. That way the manager can attempt to work out whatever problems you had to prevent them from happening in the future. Chances are if the situation was indeed serious they will take something off your bill which will save you maybe even more money than you would have saved by not tipping!


User currently offlineFoxBravo From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 2993 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2224 times:

One thing I don't understand about the American tipping culture: "if the service is particularly poor and you want to convey your dissatisfaction to the staff", you still tip, just less.

Simple: you're forgetting that the tip doesn't just benefit one person, nor does the lack thereof only harm one person. They are divided among the whole staff. So, just because you had a bitchy waitress does not mean that the busboy who poured your water should suffer too. As I said above, the whole American restaurant salary system depends on tips. Not tipping is like taking away part of the staff's salary.



Common sense is not so common. -Voltaire
User currently offlineVSLover From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 1897 posts, RR: 23
Reply 24, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2221 times:

doesnt matter if the entire staff's salary is being taken away. the service person i deal with the most (whom i am tipping) ought to think of that before he/she provides paltry service.

last night i had a facial. the facial itself was x dollars and it was wonderful. i tipped 20% on the x dollars, BUT i had an added on mask, which was another $30, upping my total, but the extra mask involved another 4 minutes of work AT MOST, and really added nothing to the experience.

so at the end my tip looked to be about 16-17% after the extra mask. boy did i get a nasty look from the woman. i mean c'mon! i asked for another few minutes of work on a process that was already 75 minutes long, give me a break. sometimes, people take the tipping thing too far sometimes.


25 Mhsieh : I rather pay a standard service charge than this tipping business. It's basically a form of "expected gift" which is awkward and insulting if not done
26 Post contains images EK001 : AMS, Always remember..no smile, no good service...NO good tip!
27 DeltAirlines : I normally tip between 15-20%. 15% is for lower than average service, 18% for average, 20% for above average. If the service is excellent, I have tipp
28 VSLover : for those of you who drop off your laundry to be done, how much do you tip them?? i generally dont, since i feel like price per pound is sufficient. f
29 Mdsh00 : VSLover, Nope. I don't tip at the laundry either.
30 Thecoz : I'd definately be willing to get rid of extra change if I lived in England. I spent several months living there. Esspecially after going to the pubs,
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