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The Station Wagon Appreciation Thread  
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7780 posts, RR: 16
Posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14143 times:

It has occured to me that we now have a generation of kids who were not raised in the back seat of a station wagon.... rather they are in SUVs or minivans. So I think we need to share our station wagon (estate for you europeans) memories.

Growing up in the 1980s there were still plenty of wagons going around as the word SUV had not entered the American lexicon and minivans were just beginning to gain popularity. I remember most of my friends and neighbors having Chevy Celebrity and Pontiac 6000 wagons. Some of the richer friends, family and neighbors were hauling their kids to soccer practice in Volvo 240s/740s wagon. And the most upwardly mobile yuppies had their kids in the back of Audi 5000 wagons.


Of course there were still a few families, including mine, that still had the big rear-drive beasts.

Here is a similar model to my familiy's:


A 1975 Dodge Coronet. Ours was the next trim level down, this model was the top of the line. It only had the fake wood wallpaper on the tailgate. It was gold with the golden yellow interior. The seats were covered in perferated vinyl which would leave the little hole marks on your thighs and ass when it was warm. Powering our wagon was a solid and reliable 318 cu inch V8. Big blocks were not all that common on the mid-sized (yes this was still considered a mid-sized wagon). Only the full-sized wagons got big blocks as standard equipment with a few exceptions.

Our beast was well suited to suburban life. It could carry our family of four with ease. Made regular trips to the lumbar yard and home center to bring home large amounts of stuff.

Ultimately it had to be retired. Chicago winters were literally eating away at the car. The bottom edge of the tailgate as well as the rear quarters were rusting away. In 1986 we finally got rid of it. After a decade of loyal service to our family.


Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
34 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineConcord977 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1261 posts, RR: 25
Reply 1, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14137 times:

Great story, and it brings back good memories for me too.

There are a couple of new 'wagons on the market right now. One that I do like is the Dodge Magnum:











No info
User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14138 times:

We used to have the old boxy Volvo. A white one.

I think some of the new wagons coming out are pretty neat:

The BMW 325Xi Sport wagon comes to mind


User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14132 times:

I actually drive one, a Volvo 40! Big grin

User currently offlineAvt007 From Canada, joined Jul 2000, 2132 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14122 times:

I`m so old, I grew up in a Volvo wagon before they were boxy! The mighty 1960 122 Canadian. Available in your choice of colours, as long as it was dark grey. I later owned a 122 4 door. I don`t know if I`d call these new fangled things a wagon, though......  Big grin

User currently offlineN312RC From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 2682 posts, RR: 16
Reply 5, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14118 times:

I had the opportunity to drive a 1992 Volvo 7 series Turbo wagon yesterday. A fine wagon indeed.. very solid.


Fly Delta's Big Jets!
User currently offlineElectraBob From United States of America, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 931 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14116 times:

When I got my first driver's license, many, many, many years ago, my Dad owned a station wagon....I'm almost sure it was a 1961 or 1962 Ford Fairlane 500 wagon.....powder blue.....6 cylinder engine....this is what I learned to drive in.

It was ugly.....it was a real pig......but I didn't care.

Drove a Ford Taurus wagon from 1997 until 2001.....loved that thing....I felt like I could put the whole house inside of that car.



Having a smoking section in a restaurant is like having a peeing section in a swimming pool.....
User currently offlineAFC_ajax00 From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 775 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 14118 times:

This thread made me laugh, my mom has always had stationwagons; we had the massive Volvo 240, what a tank! Since then, we've had Audis and now we're back to Volvo; the V70. Although my dad's got a Range Rover I think a station wagon is much more practical as a family car.


Once you have tasted flight, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward; for there you long to return
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39887 posts, RR: 74
Reply 8, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 14083 times:

DesertJets:
You must have started this thread minutes after I logged off this afternoon.



As you may already know, I LOVE stationwagons!

I am $h!tfaced drunk at the moment
.

I'll chime in this thread tomorrow after I sober up.

Got to:




My favotite stationwagons were the:
Mercury Colony Park (1973-1991)
Buick Roadmaster (1994-1996)
Buick Esate Wagon (1972-1996)
AMC Eagle Limited 4WD (1982-1984)



I'll chime in tomorrow after I wake up an can walk straight.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 14078 times:

One of these babies makes you appreciate station wagons!



Great stuff!

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39887 posts, RR: 74
Reply 10, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 14075 times:

LHSlebi:
Get that crappy low-brow German $h!t box out of this thread!
A true station wagon MUST be at least 19' long and have woodgrain side panels!


Trade in that silly bmwAudi for a REAL CAR such as a Dodge Magnum, Mercury Colony Park or Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon!



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineVaporlock From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 14068 times:

Superfly.....your right! It's gotta be a "Woodie Wagon" for sure!!!

Phyllis  Wink/being sarcastic


User currently offlinePhaeton From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 406 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14054 times:

Superfly, try driving a Dodge Magnum, Mercury Colony Park or Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon down the autobahn at 300 km/h (186 mph). Only a BMW 5 series estate or Audi A6 Estate can manage that.


"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.", Winston Churchill
User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 10 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 14033 times:

The little brother of the previously posted RS6, the RS4, is the fastest production station wagon ever built....



User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 14003 times:

Get that crappy low-brow German $h!t box out of this thread!

Hahaha! You have any idea what the RS6 is?

The little brother of the previously posted RS6, the RS4, is the fastest production station wagon ever built....

Umm, I don't really think so. Brabus make their tuned E class, the E V12, as the estate version as well! Giving it a limited(!) top speed of around 340km/h! No RS4 will ever be able to do that...

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offlineLogan22L From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 13977 times:

I've always loved wagons. Growing up, my brother had a Sunday paper route (~200 papers), and we would load up the '66 (or so) Ford Fairlaine. White with red vinyl interior. The we got a '72 or so Gran Torino wagon - silver with grey/green vinyl interior.

I've owned two myself - an '85 Volvo 245, with manual transmission, and now I am driving a '99 Volvo V70. Volvos aren't boxy anymore; this car rocks!

Logan


User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7521 posts, RR: 23
Reply 16, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 13963 times:

The first S/W (also car) that I actually remember in my life was my mother's '64 Ford Country Squire: white with a red interior. I remember riding in this wagon out to Kelly's along Revere Beach many times. My family owned it from 1966 to 1971. Other station wagons owned by either my parents or my older brother include the following:

2-1969 Mercury Colony Parks:
My father bought them both in 1971, for some reason he swapped 1 - medium green 69 model for another; the only difference between the two might've been the engine. The second one had the 429 as opposed to the 390 on the first one. He needed the large engine because he was towing a 25-foot tri-moran boat at the time. This car rode like a dream. It also had the dual-facing rear seats. Sadly, he traded it for a 1974 Pinto wagon in late '74; it was a left-over model. Talk about a culture-shock transition-wise. Due to financial issues a year earlier, he sold the tri-moran; which he made by hand over a period of 5 years.

1974 Ford Pinto Squire:
As I mentioned earlier, this was a drastic change for the family. The rear seat was a bit of a tight fit for my brother and I; and we were 11 and 8 years old respectively and skinny. My father owned this wagon from 1974 to 1977.

1969 Ford Country Squire:
At about 15 to 16 years old, my brother originally bought this wagon from a former neighbor of ours; we moved away from them a year earlier. While he did not yet have his license at the time my father allowed him to buy the car to tinker with mechanically. My brother previously bought a ratty-looking 67 Impala SS convertible for $65 in the summer of '77. He sold it about a year later. Back to the wagon, what ultimately happened with it was that my father later wound up buying it from my brother and it became one of the family vehicles for a while. The wagon had a 390 and it frequently smoked oil. My brother referred to the car as 'the pig' due to its gas consumption. We had the car from 1978 to 1979. This was the last large station wagon that any of my parents would own.

1971 Ford Country Squire:
My brother briefly had this one in 1982-83. It also had a 390 in it. On snowy night, My brother and I rode out to a snow-covered parking lot and did some donuts.

1972 Ford Pinto wagon:
My father bought this car in 1983 for about $300. I first learned to drive a manual transmission on this car. He only had it for about a year. This was the last station wagon car-type my father owned.

1975 Chevy Impala wagon:
Lime-green color. My brother bought this primarily as a 'dump-runner' vehicle in 1987. My brother and I were cutting down a lot of trees in our yard back then.

1986 Pontiac Safari wagon:
Dark maroon. My brother bought this wagon a few months before he married in late 1993. Believe it or not, someone actually stole this wagon one night in 1995 while he and his wife were asleep. Who steals station wagons? The wagon was recovered a few days later. Fortunately, it was still in one-piece. Somebody must've taken it for a joyride.

1986 Mercury Colony Park:
Dark blue, LS model w/leather trim & seats. My brother bought wagon for his wife in 1995; about one year after he married. He sold it to a friend of his about 3 years later. This one was equipped with the dual-facing rear seats.

1988 Ford Country Squire:
My brother purchased this wagon was purchased in 1998. His wife used this wagon and he used the above-mentioned 86 Merc. for a brief period until he replaced it with a 83 Caprice Estate which he still owns today. My brother's wife drove the 88 Ford from '98 to 2002. I believe this wagon also had the dual-facing rear seats.

1983 Chevy Caprice Estate wagon:
My brother refers to this car as 'Gertrude'. He bought it in to replace the '86 Merc. in 1998. It had the optional rear-facing seat. He still owns it today but his wife's oldest daughter uses the car mostly now.

1995 Ford Taurus:
This car replaced the above '88 Squire in my brother's family in 2002. My brother misses the old Ford. Unfortunately, there weren't too many newer GM B-body wagons for sale that he could afford at the time and the amount of driving that his wife was doing made his consider fuel economy a little more in the purchase. My brother's family owns this car to this day.

At some point, their current Taurus wagon will have to be replaced with another vehicle of similar type within the next year or two. A car-based station wagon best suits their needs; but the only newer (97-later) affordable mid-size or larger models available are the Taurus/Sable; the Saturn L-series wagon's a bit too small. Many SUVs and minivans out there, both new and used, are priced out of his range. The price of many European wagons fall in the forgetaboutit category.

I personally would wish that Ford and/or Mercury would bring back a wagon version of their Crown Vic./Grand Marquis especially since the platform that the 79-91 models were based off of is still around today!

Somebody else must feel the same way, see the below-web-link and scroll down to 'Concept Wagons' section. There, you will see a 'modified' profile shot of a 98 Ford Country Squire. Not to nit-pick here but it's actually a Crown Vic. wagon, a Country Squire would have the simulated woodgrain trim.

http://www.stationwagon.com/gallery/gallery.html



"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7780 posts, RR: 16
Reply 17, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 13959 times:

I'll reserve my comments on the euro wagons for later.

PHLBOS that is a long list of big FoMoCo wagons in your family. I just can't quite picture the dual facing rear seats... you're talking about the back-back row right??? Now I am pretty sure our Coronet was a 3-seat model, we hardly ever used that seat.

For a late model wagon in addition to the Taurus/Sable, and L-series, I'd suggest the Subaru Legacy/Outback. Plenty of them around and certainly not as expensive as the Volvos, Audis, M-Bs, et al. A similar vintage VW Passat might also be worthwhile checking out.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4125 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 13950 times:

Desert Jets,

That reminds me of when I lived in Chicago as a kid. My parents used to drive an old used Caprice Station Wagon. The b*itch was huge! Unfortunately it didn't last very long, but I do remember how much I loved the space in there.

I've sat in a few of these as well:




"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39887 posts, RR: 74
Reply 19, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 13942 times:

LHSebi:
Who cares about taking a stationwagon on the autobahn. Can it tow a boat?
Stationwagons aren't meant for racing.


All members here should visit;
http://www.stationwagon.com/


The grandest of all stationwagons. The 1975-1978 Mercury Colony Park Stationwagon
460cu" V8 4bbl, dual exhaust, leather seats, power everything, quad 8track player, cruise control, woodgrain sidepanels, concealed headlights, hood ornament. Deep cutplie shag carpeting. What more could you ask for in a car.







Even the 1969-1973s were nice.





The 1980-1988 AMC Eagle was unique because it was 4-wheel drive. The Limited editions had deep shag carpets, leather seats, woodgrain side panels, hood ornament (up til 1984), and power everything.



The GMs of the 1990s were an enginerring milestone. The Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon had the Corvette LT1 350cu" V8 that put out 260HP, rated at 7000 pounds towing capacity and delivers 25 miles pergallon hiway. This car featued many luxury appointments found in other Buicks & Cadillacs and a unique glass 'visita' roof' for the rear occupants.


The downsized GMs came with availible Diesel engines from 1979-1985. They could get up to 34 miles per gallon hiway. This is a 1986 model pictured.



1972 Ford Country Squire




1971 Plymouth Sport Suburban


1971 Plymouth Satellitle


The very unreliable K-Car with 2.2 turbo. The Chrysler Town & Country was a neat looking little wagon.





Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7521 posts, RR: 23
Reply 20, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 13941 times:

you're talking about the back-back row right???

DesertJets,

You are correct, I am referring to the back-back row.

For a late model wagon in addition to the Taurus/Sable, and L-series, I'd suggest the Subaru Legacy/Outback. Plenty of them around and certainly not as expensive as the Volvos, Audis, M-Bs, et al. A similar vintage VW Passat might also be worthwhile checking out.

The other import wagons you mentioned are still smaller and more expensive than a used Taurus/Sable wagon. Plus, parts for the import wagons are also more expensive to service and replace and while my brother can't do full-blown 'backyard mechanic' work on a Taurus like he could on a 60s or 70s car; a Taurus/Sable is still easier to work on.

Also, even in central Massachusetts, Suburu Legacy/Outbacks & VW Passats, new & used, have a 'yuppie following' and go for as much as some cheaper Volvos which are still out of my brother's price range.

Edited to add:

Superfly,

Other than the front face, the 73-74 Mercury Colony Parks exteriors were essentially identical to the 75-78 models. This was also true for the full-size Ford wagons. I believe that the 460 V8 (which was originally a Lincoln-only engine prior to the '72 T-Bird) became available mid-way through the 73 model year after they exhausted their remaining supply of 429s.

The color of that 69 Colony Park pictured is the same color as the ones my father owned; only ours didn't have the vinyl roof.

[Edited 2004-11-22 22:57:57]


"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offlinePelican From Germany, joined Apr 2004, 2531 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 13930 times:

Can it tow a boat?

I guess a torque of 560 Nm and 450 horses are enough to tow a boat, isn't it?

pelican


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39887 posts, RR: 74
Reply 22, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days ago) and read 13924 times:

Pelican:
I guess a torque of 560 Nm and 450 horses are enough to tow a boat, isn't it?

Nope!

Those hores are at a high RPM. The large American wagons have lots of torque and horsepower at low RPMs.



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineWhitehatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days ago) and read 13917 times:

Pah!



The finest estate car ever built by man...


(except for the Peugeot 407SW which is just stunning...)


User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8507 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (9 years 10 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 13911 times:

I guess a torque of 560 Nm and 450 horses are enough to tow a boat, isn't it?

I like the S6 myself, but I wouldn't be surprised to find that it's not recommended for towing at all. AWD and too much horsepower and all that.


The ultimate Japanese station wagon: 85-87 Toyota Cressida wagon. We owned an 85 model from 1985 to 2002.



The best feature was the engine, a 2.8 inline Six



25 Post contains images DesertJets : An RS6 is all well and good, but not really the point of this thread. I was more thinking along the lines of classics or at least cars of our youth. N
26 MD-90 : I'm glad Mom won out and got the Cressida instead of a 240. Dad wanted the 240 because you could get a stick in it (only stick in Cressida sedans, not
27 Superfly : MD-90: The Nissan Maxima wagons were nice. I like the rear-drive models that wen till 1984 -1985. The Toyota Cressida sedans were nice as a sedan alth
28 Post contains images Whitehatter : This is the estate/SW that beats all others to a sticky pulp at the moment The Subaru Legacy Sports Tourer. Estates just don't come more powerful or p
29 Vaman : Funny that you should ask MD-90: I actually spent months finding a pristine 240 wagon with a 5 speed. My parents were making me get a 240 and i figure
30 Pelican : Superfly Those hores are at a high RPM. The large American wagons have lots of torque and horsepower at low RPMs. Do you call 1900 RPM as high? The RS
31 SmithAir747 : I practically grew up in the back of a station wagon! My parents needed 2 station wagons to haul our large family of 10 children around! When I first
32 Post contains images 707cMf : Until 1981 (I was borne in 1977), my parents had no car. They bough in 1981 (or 1982 ?) a Peugeot 304 break (we say "break" in France to design a SW v
33 Post contains images UTA_flyingHIGH : I do not like SW very much. However, when UTAette and myself will have kids, these will be on the shopping list : For myself For UTAette :D UTA
34 Superfly : Pelican: The little bmw/audi wagons you posted don't have the frame the tow anything. In fact I am sure the owner's manual will have a diclaimer stati
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