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Abandoned Railroad Lines (SoCal Special)  
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 46
Posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3702 times:

How's this for a non-aviation topic?

In addition to planes, I've also always had a liking for trains. Granted I wasn't as passionate about trains as I was planes, but still, I enjoy watching them.

One particular railroad I've always been fond of was the Santa Fe line that ran between San Bernardino and Los Angeles via Pasadena.

This line ran through the following cities:

San Bernardino, Rialto, Fontana, Rancho Cucamonga, Upland, Montclair, Claremont, Pomona, La Verne, San Dimas, Glendora, Azusa, Irwindale, Duarte, Arcadia, Pasadena, South Pasadena, Chinatown, and finally Los Angeles.

As a kid growing up in San Dimas just a few blocks from this line, I would always ride my bike down to the tracks to watch the trains go by. My cousin and friends would often hang out down there.

Piggyback, freight, and Amtrak trains would fly through here going either to or from LA/S.Berdo. I still remember the time when I was 11 or 12 and I got cited by the Santa Fe for "trespassing".

In 1988, I moved to West Covina. With that, I pretty much stopped watching the trains here. But I always naturally assumed they would always be there.

It wasn't until sometime in 1994 that I happened to be driving on Santa Anita Ave in Arcadia that I had a rude surprise and looked as I was crossing the tracks that I saw that the rails had been cut and thus service presumably stopped.

I later learned that this line was sold to Los Angeles MTA for use as a future "light rail" line. In doing my research (I love the Internet), I discovered that the tracks were abandoned and cut in January, 1994 following the Northridge earthquake. Apparently two bridges on this line were damaged an no longer suitable for trains: the Arroyo-Seco bridge in South Pasadena, which spans the 110 Freeway and the Arcadia 210 freeway flyover bridge.

The section between LA and Pasadena sat unused for several years. The original plan was to build it as an extension of the Long Beach Blue Line.

But those plans later collapsed and the project was revised and later emerged as the Metro Gold Line. After a couple of years of construction, it opened last summer.

As it's no longer a through line, there is no reason to expect to see long freight trains or even Amtrak anymore: there's nowhere for them to go. It's a dead-end line.

Here is, as far as I can tell, the current status of the line:

Los Angeles-Pasadena:

Rebuilt as Metro Gold line. But it just stops in the middle of the freeway at Rosemead Blvd.

Pasadena (Rosemead Blvd-Arcadia, site of old bridge). The right of way still exists. But the track has been torn out. There is, however a railroad signal still standing right at Baldwin Ave. It looks odd there, what with no tracks and no trains. The flyover bridge was torn out, although you can see where it used to be.

There is a small, about one mile section of the original track still in existance, but as the pictures below show, they have not been used in over a decade.

Arcadia-Irwindale:

The rails are cut just east of Santa Anita Ave. The track is still active east of here, although I'm not sure why. There are no freight sidings that I'm aware of.

Irwindale-Pomona:

The Miller Brewery is the only thing still keeping this line alive. They receive a shipment of a few cars each day. A slow moving train carrying maybe 5 or 6 cars is a far cry from the 100 car freights and Amtraks that used to fly along at about 70.

Pomona-San Bernardino:

This line serves as a Metrolink line and is very, very busy with the commuter trains. There is a junction in Pomona, where the rest of the Metrolink line runs further south along a now defunct Southern Pacific line the rest of the way to LA.

Now some questions I have:

Why was the line between Pomona, Pasadena, and LA not set up for Metrolink service? Apart from rebuilding the two damaged bridges, it would've been a hell of a whole lot cheaper to use an existing system than start from scratch, which was done. Connectivity to other points in SoCal would've been a lot better with Metrolinks much more extensive network. Metro light rail (basically a bus on rails with none of the excitement that REAL trains have) has very limited service and appeal.


anyway, here are some pictures that I recently took:

In San Dimas, looking west from between Monte Vista and Cataract Avenues. This is my childhood spot and looks much the same as it did back then. The line is still active here. Note the signal, which is on and illuminated green.



The daily "beer train" heading west, approaching Monte Vista Ave in San Dimas. It's about 4 engines and 4 cars, crawling along at about 20MPH. A far cry from 8 engines and a hundred cars moving at 70 MPH. But at least it's still a train.



The same train heading away.



Heading around the curve towards Glendora. The crossing in the foreground is Bonita/Cataract Ave and the crossing in the distance is Eucla Ave. Note the signal has now turned red.



The "end of the line" in Arcadia, looking northwest. Santa Anita is the crossing beyond the "bumper". Note the rail just laying on the ballast like nobody cares what happens to it.



What's left of the crossing gates on Santa Anita Ave. They haven't been maintained in over a decade and it shows. This is the only remaining crossing of the "abandoned" section still in service. East of here, the track is still active. West of here, there are no crossings until downtown Pasadena. And those are all shiny and new inasmuch as it's the new Gold Line trolley system.

I wonder if gas trucks and buses have to stop before going over this crossing?



The "abandoned" section in Arcadia, between Santa Anita and the 210 freeway, facing northwest. The only non-active stretch of the original line still in existance.



The same stretch of track, about a quarter mile west of Santa Anita Ave, looking east.



The true "end of the line". If you were to follow the tracks just behind the curve, you would fall onto the very heavy traffic of the 210 freeway.



So any of you train fans have a once favorite line that's no longer used?





[Edited 2004-12-11 03:16:09]

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3682 times:

A little conflicted about what I see here. Never like to see transporation systems dismantled but I grew up walking abandoned railroad rights of way and I'm salivating over this one. Railroads make great walking paths. I particularly like "abandoned in place" lines (rails still there) to walk, especially after they've grown in a bit.

A couple months ago I was in Ukiah Calif. and saw some guys on an improvised pushcar headed north on the apparently abandoned railroad to Eureka. I almost jumped out of my car to join them.

One day I am going to sneak in and walk Carrizo Gorge!



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineClickhappy From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 9633 posts, RR: 68
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3667 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

great topic!

In the Seattle area there have been several lawsuits from property owners suing local governments because they turn the rights-of-way into walking trails, and the property owners feel it is an invasion of privacy.


User currently offlineDan2002 From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 2055 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3657 times:

Great story and pics Matt. I also have a similar story, but wont be as dramatic because I still can be considered to be in my childhood. But here it is anyway. Right down the street from my house, there is a crossing of 4 tracks. Strangest crossing I have ever seen. The siding starts about a mile back, over the W.117th street bridge. Over that, it breaks off into an abandoned siding, while the other part continues on. From there, it crosses a small side-street, where it once broke off into about 4 different sidings, and sidings off of those. Then it went straight, then right before the road crossing, it breaks off into 3 tracks, 2 still used, one I don't know if they will ever use again, but went into my fathers former place of employment. They made heavy-duty truck frames. Well, once into that property, it breaks off again, one goes straight, and the other breaks left and goes straight , while yet another siding breaks off from that. The pictures at the end will help a lot BTW. Well, the one that broke left went straight into the plant, but were paved over when they expanded about 20 years ago, but where un-earthed when they tore the place down. Then back outside the fence, there is a switch, that when switched, switched the train from one track to another that backtracked, back over the road and into a warehouse. Adding the 4th track to the crossing. The 2 that go into the chemical plant I don't know much about, but once went straight, paraell with the road, all the way up, and went across what is now I-90 and was used to deliver goods to Sears along time ago. The chemical plant tracks still get used once a day, and the last time the other ones that went where my dad worked were used to take some equipment out after the liquidation. I used to hang out around those tracks a lot when I was younger, with my father most of the time , when I went to work with him. I still hang around there today, just the other day I was looking around where his plant used to be, and the tracks that ran through the building some 75 years ago are still there. Now, for the photos. If someone could tell me how to resize the photos so they done interfere with the page layout I could end a lot of the confusion left by all of those sidings.

-Dan



A guy asks 'What's Punk?'. I kick over a trash can and its punk. He knocks over a trash can and its trendy.
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3638 times:

Back in Chattanooga, Tennessee where I once lived, there were a number of rail lines that were partially or totally abandoned. The one that is most interesting was the old Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain Railroad. It was built in the late 1880s and abandoned by 1900, though the right of way was later used for trolley service by the Chattanooga Railway and Light Company as late as 1927. It carried passengers from the train station in downtown Chattanooga to the hotels and military park atop Lookout Mountain. Unfortunately, due to the lack of freight business on the mountain and the periodic shutdowns at the hotels, the railroad never made a profit either as a steam road or trolley line. In its last years, it was used one or two days out of the year to provide passenger service between Lookout Mountain and Chattanooga when Incline No. 2 was down for maintenance. This line also connected with the Mount Lookout Narrow Gauge Railroad which ran from the old Point Hotel to Sunset Rock. Only the right of ways survive in the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, though some of the C&ALM Antillean Airlines (Netherlands Antilles)">LM bridges remain as the Park Service uses it as a service road.

Another couple of ghost railroads on Lookout Mountain are the Incline No. 1 and the Chattanooga and Durham Railroad. Incline No. 1 was located less than a mile from the site of Incline No. 2 and operated from 1885 to 1895 when it was replaced by Incline No. 2. No. 1 remained abandoned until 1900 when it was dismantled and only the right of way survives. The Chattanooga and Durham was built in the late 1800s to transport coal from the mines at Durham, Georgia to the coke ovens in Crawfish Springs (now Chickamauga), Georgia. It was eventually purchased by the Central of Georgia Railway and last operated in 1947. In 1951 the rails were pulled. The right of way survives, though a good portion is located on private property that is patrolled.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3604 times:

Awesome photos Matt....thanks for that little bit of rustic self indulgence. I know they use old railroads and turn em into trails nowadays, but what I wouldn't give to find a stretch like this, pack a rucksack and a tent, and just follow.....ahhh, the west coast.

Even cooler for this Florida guy to see some mountains for a change Big grin

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3603 times:

I grew up the son of a Railroader . . . my Father worked Central of Georgia, Southern, UP, Milwaukee Road, Alaska RR and the White Pass and Yukon. Retired from the White Pass. I love trains. Will take a train when practical. When I lived in the DC area I would always travel by train when on business to NYC, PHL or BOS. Sure as hell beat waiting on US Airways Shuttle. Not that the plane wasn't fast - once it was in the air - but the ground time on each end sucked. Amtrak was great.

Last summer I went back to Skagway, Alaska, home of the White Pass Railroad (see www.whitepassrailroad.com) and took another trip. Too much history with that railroad to get into on a-net.

Also like the Coast Starlight . . . excellent train. The Pacific Parlor Car really makes that trip worth the $$$.

Great post and great pics Matt . . . thanks!


User currently offlineSccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5520 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3526 times:

Matt- Too much irony in the fact that the Metro is being built, in so many places, on right of way which was caused to be abandoned when the vestiges of the Pacific Electric system were shut down in the late 50s and early 60s. And they have paid hundreds of millions to buy them back!

If you relish this stuff (and you surely do, as your excellent post and photos suggest), you really should take the time to travel out (it ain't too far for you) to Perris and visit the Orange Empire Railway Museum ( http://www.oerm.org ); it is an outstanding working railway museum, which means that they are a fully-functional railroad, operating just like big, grown-up lines such as BNSF. If I had not moved back to Texas, I would surely have joined the place and wuld, by now, have gotten licensed as a motorman on one of their old trolleys (not much chance for a noob like me to drive the big iron, I think!).

When they put on railfest and other events, it is a blast.

If I am not mistaken, they actually have taken over some trackage abandoned by SF; I may have my details wrong, but they definitely have some tracks outside the fence (so to speak). Was some talk about OERM operating as a short line for service to Perris area railusers, have no idea whether they ever did it. They certainly have the hardware and expertise to do so.

SoCal is some of the best railroad history territory, since railroads played such an important part in California's history, and because old trackage and rolling stock, if not purposely destroyed, last pretty much forever in the arid climate.

A first-class outfit, and a very worthy use of your time to visit.



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineRj111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3516 times:

Yeh love trains (i know, im sad) and i often cannot decide what i prefer (planes vrs trains). I love the power and speed of seeing and travelling on planes, but i also love the views on a train journey and i'm content in looking out off the window for hours. I guess the TGV caters for both my needs. Im suprised the US never invested in the things actually, i could see them working wonders on the BOS-NYC-IAD-MIA section (yes i know you've got that Acela thing but it seems a load of tosh in comparison).

Used to be a abandoned railway in my old town in Dustable UK, which provided good walks. I believe they are now going to connect this branch line up to the mainline to London, which is a step in the right direction. Abandoned railways pissed me off though, especially when you see all the lorries on the motorways here.

Fancy trying out the trains in the US one day - heard they were pretty shite though - but i wanna give the Chicago to Oakland one a go, views look pretty nice. Anyone tried that, any good?

The Moskow to Beijing line sounds cultural too.


User currently offlineSaxdiva From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2382 posts, RR: 41
Reply 9, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 3485 times:

Dangit, Matt...every time I get ready to write you off as an unbearable curmudgeon, you start a cool thread like this.  Smile

I've always described myself as a person who's fascinated by big, noisy machines. Airplanes, trains... they both intimidate (especially locomotives) and intrigue me. My brother also works for Amtrak, so things that run on rails are always popular in the family. Anyhow, I definitely second the recommendation that you check out OERM. I've been there before, and it was a blast--the equipment is amazingly varied, and they've got a ton of stuff in different phases of restoration. In fact, I'm overdue for another visit--much of the expansion has taken place since I was last there.

For a city with such a piss-poor public transportation system, Los Angeles bursts at the seams with rail history. Streetcar lines that originated in the city once terminated near my house, and I'm always on the lookout for their artifacts. There were also a vast number of inclines and funiculars in the hills in and around LA, and we had one near-complete specimen just a few blocks away until they finally dismantled it about a year ago. I'd love to take a day or two (and my schedule has freed up enough that I could probably pull it off in the next couple of weeks) and go photograph some of these sites. If I do, I'll be sure to post updates.

Cheers,
Leanne


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14026 posts, RR: 62
Reply 10, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3475 times:

Saxdiva,

As a musician you should like Arthur Honegger´s "Pacific 231"!

Jan


User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3473 times:

Rj111: "Fancy trying out the trains in the US one day - heard they were pretty shite though - but i wanna give the Chicago to Oakland one a go, views look pretty nice. Anyone tried that, any good?"

That Chicago-Oakland train is called the California Zephyr. Superliner equipped (2 level passenger cars). Not a bad ride, if things are working on time.

If I had to make a recommendation tho, it would be the Coast Starlight from Seattle to Los Angeles. North to South, better scenery that way. Get a sleeping car accomodation and spend your day idling away the time in the Pacific Parlor Car. Coast Starlight is the only Amtrak long haul train with an exclusive lounge car just for first class (Sleeping Car) customers.

Enjoy the ride . . .



User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7521 posts, RR: 23
Reply 12, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3452 times:

In my hometown of Marblehead, MA, one can still see traces of the old B&M line that used to run through the town. The 'branch' rail lines (from the Salem & Boston to the current T Commuter Rail line) shut down back in the late '50s. Right after that happened, a whole bunch of split level homes were built up to the right-of-way in the Clifton section of town. During the 2nd oil price shock or 1979, there was some buzz about reviving the rail service as an alternate means of commuter transport (Marblehead is a pretty much a car-only town); but no action was ever taken.

The tracks were taken out decades ago and the old stations (one in Clifton and the other in downtown Marblehead) have since been torn down as well. The right-of-way still exists as a walking or bike trail. I used it many times as a kid.

In southeastern PA (where I live now), there are some closed braches of the SEPTA Regional Rail system (R3 Elwyn-West Chester, R6 Cynwyd-Ivy Ridge, and R8 Fox Chase-Newtown) that are presently just dead right-of-ways that still have tracks and overhead catenary wires running along it. As with the Marblehead line that closed decades before, major residential development occurred near 2 of the 3 closed SEPTA rail lines. Yes, mistakes can be repeated in different regions.



"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 13, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3444 times:

Hey PHLBOS last summer I hiked some of that line I think. From somewhere west of Granite Run? Rails were rusty and some brush starting up between the ties but not too long abandoned. Eventually got to some signs that said it was private property of the Octoraro RR.

The hardest part of that was finding a place to park my car anywhere near the line.

Out where I grew up, there is a "lost" Baldwin 0-4-0 that was built in about 1874 and went in the creek in about 1888. I know where large parts of it are to be found. Next summer I am going to guide a RR historian to the boiler.

It is said that another old Baldwin on that line was parked on a spur laid, unballasted, on muddy ground. During the night the track split and it sank maybe six feet into the mud. One old timer told me that he visited it years later and only the steam and sand dome stuck out of the ground. The cab and stack were gone, the creek had changed course slightly and it was all but buried in solid ground.

There are some problems with the story. Although no pictures exist of this locomotive after 1916, no disposition record exists either, where all the rest of the rolling stock is accounted for. The problem is that all of that land has been logged since. You'd think that someone would have noticed a locomotive sticking out of the ground.

All the old timers are dead now or losing their memories. If this one is found it will just be a chance thing.




Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineProsimtec From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3430 times:

I've taken the Southwest Limited from LA to Chicago a couple of times. Absolutely wonderful. I was sitting in the vista dome car as we went though the Rockies. Way too cool!
The food was excellent, and after a couple of cocktails, you don't notice the constant rocking of the train!


User currently offlinePHLBOS From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 7521 posts, RR: 23
Reply 15, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3429 times:

Hey PHLBOS last summer I hiked some of that line I think. From somewhere west of Granite Run? Rails were rusty and some brush starting up between the ties but not too long abandoned. Eventually got to some signs that said it was private property of the Octoraro RR.

The hardest part of that was finding a place to park my car anywhere near the line.


SlamClick,

The abandoned R3 line starts at the Elwyn station (located southeast of the Granite Run Mall off of Route 352) and proceeds westward. One can park at any of the abandoned stations (in westbound order): Williamson School, Glen Riddle, Lenni, Wawa (which crosses U.S. 1), Glen Mills, Cheyney, Westtown, West Chester University and the West Chester Station. and walk along the line. There are some long-term plans in the works for SEPTA to revive the abandoned line up to the Wawa station, but that remains to be seen.

At present, SEPTA is threatening fare increases and more service cuts if it doesn't get more state funding from Harrisburg; that issue alone can be a whole thread on its own.



"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3399 times:

If you consider riding an Amtrak train, don't ride the Sunset Limited if you're needing to arrive at your destination anywhere near the published arrival time. Traffic here is strangling UP. Of course, they abandoned the old SP west of Phoenix and the El Paso and Southwestern east to El Paso was long ago abandoned by SP.

As for locomotives that were buried/sank, I know for a fact that three East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad locomotives were sunk in the Tennessee River, near Loudon, Tennessee in 1863. Two verified accounts from that period indicate that three locomotives were run off the end of the wrecked Tennessee River bridge after getting trapped between Charleston and Loudon to prevent them from falling into federal hands. No written record indicates that the locomotives were salvaged later on, so it is possible that whatever is left of them remained in the river. One of the accounts was an official company report issued following the war. Also, the conductor who had them run off the bridge wrote a book later on and mentioned the incident in detail.

Along the lines of redevelopment of existing lines, the State of Georgia is working to commence rail commuter service along a number of intrastate corridores and is pushing state funding for the projects, chiefly on the Western and Atlantic Division of CSXT. Commuter service will be put on that line as the state has significant leverage on CSXT, being that the state owns (and always has owned) the Western and Atlantic Railroad of the State of Georgia and is landlord to CSXT. As long as the state funds the necessary improvements, CSXT has no say concerning passenger service on the line.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 46
Reply 17, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3394 times:

Thanks for the info. I'll have to check out that Railroad museum.

Now for all of you train historians, can you tell me THIS, regarding the "Pasadena Subdivision", a.k.a. Santa Fe "Second District", which is the original subject of this thread.

All of my my research has failed to answer me the following questions:

What date did the "last" Amtrak operate on this line? Was it "Southwest Chief", "Sunset Limited", or "Desert Wind"?

I know all three ran on this line at one time or another, but I cannot find any information on when the last one operated, which train it was, the time of day, and which direction it ran.

Next, what date did the very last Santa Fe freight train operate on the "through" line before it was abandoned?

Was it a long piggyback train or a short one like the one pictured? Time of day, and which direction?

And lastly, what date were the rails actually cut?


User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 40
Reply 18, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3372 times:

Test post (reference: http://www.airliners.net/discussions/site_related/read.main/30541/)

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineSaxdiva From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2382 posts, RR: 41
Reply 19, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3364 times:

Hey, Matt,

As I mentioned, my brother works for Amtrak, and he can probably find out when their last train rolled over that area. Here's his initial response to your question:

The last to operate was the Southwest Chief as the Desert Wind had been
gone for about 6 years at this point. The Sunset, (chicken bone express)
operates down the center of the 10 staying south of Pasadena. The Sunset
would very rarely operate on the Pasadena line--only in times of
maintenance or derailment (outages). In fact both trains used separate
stations in Pomona, one on the SP and one on the SF.

Last train in Pasadena? Hard to tell, I could find out though. I stopped
selling tickets there in '90 or '91. I do know the last one through there
though was a westbound (#3).


Update to follow...
-Leanne


User currently offlineRj111 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3317 times:

Looks like this railways bitten the dust too, look through the photos the scenery is gorgeous.

http://colorado.railfan.net/tennpass/tpass1.html

especially this one.



I just hope it is reactivated some day, would make the perfect tourist line.


User currently offlineMatt D From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 9502 posts, RR: 46
Reply 21, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3265 times:

Does anyone know if the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge RR in Colorado is still in service?

Any follow up on the history of the rail line I was asking about would be appreciated.

SaxDiva:

Ask your brother if he knows why they didn't simply have Metrolink take over that line...I'd be curious to know why Santa Fe and the MTA decided to take the harder, longer, and far more expensive route (no pun intended) of completely rebuilding the line-taking nearly a decade to do so-and that's just for the first segment, rather than using Metrolink as a drop-in replacement to Amtrak, using existing track, signals, crossings, etc, which would've cost maybe a fiftieth of what the Gold Line will ultimately cost-when it finally opens (IF it ever opens) in 2012-nearly TWO DECADES after the original service ended.


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39887 posts, RR: 74
Reply 22, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3256 times:

Matt D:

"Pasadena Subdivision" ?

OK that is certainly begging for my reply. Big grin

I lived near those tracks. It ran down the center of the 210 freeway when it passed up Allen and Hill bl. (That's ware I used to live), south of the 210 near Cal Tech and PCC.

I remember hanging out all the time down in Old Town Pasadena before it became a trendy yuppie playground. The train ran across Colorado Bl. near a guitar store I used to visit. It's now gone like all the other nice sleazy bars.

Trains are fascinating and so are the abandoned rail lines. When I grew up in Gary, Indiana, there was an abandoned rail line behind our back yard. The old metal spikes that held the rails to the wood planks I used as toys.
When I was 7 I beat up another kid with one for pushing me off my bike. He never did that again.  Big grin



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3251 times:

The Durango and Silverton Railroad still operates but under new ownership. Recently it was sold by Charles Bradshaw to First American Railways, which is a Florida based company. They also own the Great Smokey Mountains Railway which operates over a line leased from the State of North Carolina. The Durango and Silverton Railroad is a resiliant operation, having survived the 1989 roundhouse fire that shut the railroad down for a good portion of the season. Then there were the closures of the National Forest land back a couple of years ago. The railroad now has a contingency plan in place to reduce the wildfire threat while maintaining a semblence of normal operations. This includes increased fire patrols, reducing the area of operation and even using diesel locomotives in place of the steam locomotives.

Arguably, the better ride is the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad, which operates on the easternmost part of the narrow gauge from Chama, New Mexico to Antonito, Colorado. They have several steam locomotives and all of the original maintenance facilities, plus those added by the States following their purchase of the railroad in the late 1960s. The train ride is 64 miles one way and includes the climb over Cumbres Pass. The summit is at 10,240 feet and is a site to behold.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 24, posted (9 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3244 times:

You guys reminded me of something cool...the CP Rail Spiral Tunnels in Alberta. I remember doing a project on the Last Spike in elementary school and being fascinated by the tunnels. I always wanted to ride on a VIA train in the last car and see the engine come out right on top of me.





Those grain trains went through my hometown constantly. They brought grain from the Prairies to the big grain elevators in Thunder Bay, where the grain was stored before it was shipped out through the St. Lawrence Seaway. I remember in the summer I could hear the trains banging all night long.



The grain trains went right through the center of town and it was a real pain if one of them stopped. I remember once when I worked for a lawyer and we had to file something at the courthouse by 10 am. I raced a grain train eight crossings before I could cross the tracks in front of it.



But that was when I ruled the world
25 Post contains links and images SlamClick : I've got a good friend who is an ex-airline res agent and he loves trains. A few years ago the AF Concorde came to Reno and a bunch of us got to go up
26 Saxdiva : Heh heh... Matt, I'll have to see what Amtrak's take on that is. I do know the did some substantial re-routing in Pasadena, and I don't know how close
27 Post contains images Mirrodie : Great thread dude Always loved aviation but hold a weird spot in my heart for the Long Island Railroad era from 1097 to 2001. They were the last to us
28 57AZ : I've always had a special love of trains that even transcends my love of civil aviation. The Tehachapi Loop is one of the western railroad engineering
29 AAplatnumflier : The one that goes through Chatsworth California. I rember when trains used to run along that ..... now the Orange Line....
30 SlamClick : Hey Mirrodie the Tehachapi Loop is alongside Highway 58 between Bakersfield and the Mojave Desert - near Tehachapi. I've been told but no personal exp
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