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Czech Republic Or Czechia?  
User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11154 posts, RR: 59
Posted (9 years 12 months 14 hours ago) and read 2012 times:

It is my understanding that the official formal name of the country is Czech Republic, however in all non-formal cases it is my understanding that the government prefers the name Czechia.

All countries have a long formal name and a short non-formal name and most often the short non-formal name of the country is used.

For example, the formal name of France is French Republic. However that name is only used in formal cases.

However, everyone in the public calls it by the non-formal name, France.

What exactly is the reason why the name Czechia has never caught on?

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Regards


"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 33
Reply 1, posted (9 years 12 months 8 hours ago) and read 1957 times:

Interesting topic.

I also seem to remember that the Czechs recently introduced Cesky as the official short form of Ceska Republica. I don´t know whether this "caught on", be it either as Cesky in the country herself or Czechia in the Anglophone world.

In Germany, the situation is as follows: Besides the formal Tschechische Republik, people used to say Tschechei. This term was first coined by the Nazis when they cut up then Czechoslovakia in the 30s. Hence it was not very desirable to have Tschechei as the informal name for the Tschechische Republik. That´s when Tschechien was "invented". This new term was not very widely used and perceived as kind of awkward, but now it seems to have been accepted, linguistically.


The only other country I can think of as not having an informal version of her name is the Dominican Republic - I guess because Dominica is already taken by an entirely different country.

Daniel Smile


User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5743 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (9 years 12 months 7 hours ago) and read 1944 times:

BA,
I can't say much on the Czechia/Czech Republic issue since English is not my 1st language so it's up to those with Engligh to say how they like it and how it sounds to them.

One of the reasons could be, that 10 years of use is not long enough. Quite often I still see Czechoslovakia/Czechoslovak Airlines as options in various pulldown menus on the web.
BTW, even the pros from CNN seem to get confused, not about the name but location: http://www.icccr.org/images/switzerland_on_cnn_kl.jpg

Another factor is that Czech Rep. does not make the news too often (except for hockey, football, floods, Prague taxi mafia & sex industry... Wink/being sarcastic). I'm sure, that couple years of civil war would greatly improve public knowledge about our existence. Look what it does to previously little known countries like Sudan, Cote d' Ivoire or Bosnia.

Daniel,
thanks for your elaboration on the Tschechei/Tschechien. I knew that "Tschechei" had negative connotations thanks to Hitler (amazing how much he influenced...), but I always thought he "invented" that word and that Tschechien was "natural" to German.

The problem with widely acceptable one word name exists even in the local language. "Èeská republika" is the official name and there was an effort of the linguists, media and others for the use of"Èesko", which to my ears sounds absolutely horrible. "Èechy" is sometimes used, but there are limitations due to that fact that it's a word in plural form only and it could reffer also to Czechs as people. It gets soo complicated because the Czech grammar with its declination and words changing its form according to that and 1000+1 other rules and exemptions from the rules is so compliacted, it's every child's nightmare while attending elementary school .


User currently offlineDuke From Canada, joined Sep 1999, 1155 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (9 years 12 months 5 hours ago) and read 1921 times:

Living as I do in the Czech Republic, I'd say it's best to use the full state name - "the Czech Republic". The people like it more than the sometimes-used short form "Czesko" (when I write z, it's instead of a V above the c - read CHesko), which basically translates to "Czech". Also, Czechy is not completely correct - it historically refers only to Bohemia, the largest of the three "provinces" of the Czech Republic (the other two, to the East, are Moravia and Czech Silesia).

Not all countries have both a formal state name (the French Republic, the United States of America) and an everyday name (France, America). Canada, for example, has only Canada (it used to use "the Dominion of Canada" in the days when it was legally linked to Britain, but not any more) and I think the Dominican Republic only has the full state name. If it were up to me, I'd replace "the Czech Republic" with CZECHLAND (it'd be like Poland etc) for everyday use, but one or two Czechs I've spoken to don't like it. I think the people here really like that word "republic". It's common, for example, to say "the Slovak Republik" (Slovenska Republika) for the country they used to be linked with and which is known worldwide as Slovakia (Slovensko).


User currently offlineKEno From Malaysia, joined Feb 2004, 1842 posts, RR: 27
Reply 4, posted (9 years 12 months 4 hours ago) and read 1914 times:

"Czech Republic" is quite a mouthful if you compare to "Cesky", "Èechy" etc. The same goes to Dominican Republic, which I believe name "Dominica" has been taken by another caribbean nation. But this is nothing compared to "Macedonia" : they must be known by the full title Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. I hope they could someday reach an agreement with Greece on this issue. "F.Y.R" sounds so demeaning.

User currently offlineWhitehatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 12 months 4 hours ago) and read 1913 times:

Try living in "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" then... Nuts

I'm pretty sure the full legal title is even longer (although never used)


User currently offlineJaspike From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2008, 1 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 12 months 2 hours ago) and read 1904 times:

We have "Czechia - Air Force" in the database.. and a few weeks ago I emailed Peter and asked why, because I'd never heard of the word "Czechia" before.. here's part of what he said:

.......However, I also saw a Czech (Republic) website that said the following: "Czechia is the official one-word name of the Czech Republic. In 1993 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic in its memorandum to all Czech embassies and diplomatic missions recommended to use the full name "Czech Republic" only in official documents and titles of official institutions. In all other cases, the one-word name Czechia should be preferred".......

Tom


User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11154 posts, RR: 59
Reply 7, posted (9 years 12 months ago) and read 1879 times:

Thanks for all the feedback everyone!

I remember seeing Ceska Republica when I visited it in summer 2001.

And you're right, not all countries have a formal long name such as Dominican Republic (for the reasons already mentioned).

There are some countries which also do not have a non-formal short name and only a formal long-name.

Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of the Congo come to mind since these two countries share the same name.

Some have differntiate them by calling them Congo-Kinshasa and Congo-Brazzaville, but I don't think these two names are officially recognized.

Getting back to the Czech Republic, I found this on Wikipedia:

The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1993 announced that the name Czechia (Czech: Èesko) is to be used in all situations other than formal official documents and the full names of government institutions, but this has not caught on in English usage.

I found these two very interesting articles that talk about this issue if anyone is interested:
http://www.p.lodz.pl/I35/personal/jw37/EUROPE/cesko1.htm
http://www.p.lodz.pl/I35/personal/jw37/EUROPE/cesko2.htm

I know in Arabic, we call it "Czechia." I remember hearing it all the time in the Euefa games over the summer when I was in Lebanon.

Again, thanks for all the feedback.

Merry Christmas everyone!

Regards



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1872 times:

The only other country I can think of as not having an informal version of her name is the Dominican Republic - I guess because Dominica is already taken by an entirely different country.

People sometimes use the initials "D.R." as a sort of informal short name.



"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11154 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1853 times:

Since we are on this topic. Could somebody tell me if the official title of the Vatican is Holy See or Vatican City? I have always been confused by this.

The CIA Factbook website seems to recognize it as Holy See, while most other websites recognize the title as Vatican City.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Regards



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineKEno From Malaysia, joined Feb 2004, 1842 posts, RR: 27
Reply 10, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1843 times:

Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of the Congo come to mind since these two countries share the same name.

I often hear on TV news that Congo (Kinshasa) is often pronounced as simply D.R.C. Much easier.


User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11154 posts, RR: 59
Reply 11, posted (9 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1833 times:

Yup, I call it DRC myself.

Regards



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
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